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What does “javascript:void(0)” mean?

In the below snippet what does javascript:void mean ? How can i make the user follow the link when he clicks the logout link provided href="javascript:void"?

<a href="javascript:void()" id="logout" onClick="#" ><strong>Logout</strong></a>
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marked as duplicate by squint, mellamokb, stewe, Mike Samuel, Graviton Apr 20 '12 at 4:20

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

Related:… – fncomp Apr 20 '12 at 3:14

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

void is a function that takes any input and returns nothing.

It is commonly used in links to make them not go anywhere. Kind of like the links that have href="#", but without affecting the browser history. There is almost always an onclick event attached that tells the browser what to actually do. In the code you gave, the onclick attribute is not valid JavaScript...

If you want the link to actually go somewhere, just use a regular href.

<a href="logout.php" id="logoug"><strong>Logout</strong></a>
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can't i use javascript:void and then make the user go to some other link. Actually i don't wan't browser to let the user see the link he is about to click. Isn't it possible using onClick ? – saplingPro Apr 20 '12 at 3:15
I guess so: <a href="javascript:void();" onClick="location.href='blah';">, but why would you want to do that? The user will get to see it anyway when they click on it, and you're supposed to tell users what a link does... – Niet the Dark Absol Apr 20 '12 at 3:20
It's an operator like typeof, not a function. Parentheses are not required around its argument. – Mike Samuel Apr 20 '12 at 3:29
If you don't want the behaviour of an A element, don't use one. E.g. <span onclick="document.location.href='';">Foo</span>. – RobG Apr 20 '12 at 3:54

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