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I am looking for a .Net (preferably C#) implementation of a priority queue or heap.

Unless I am looking in the wrong place, there isn't one in the framework. Is anyone aware of a good one, or should I roll my own?

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16  
Not sure why this was closed? Priority queues are used in a lot of algorithms, and given that there are none built into the .Net framework, this question is insanely useful. –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Mar 13 '13 at 18:27
9  
"[T]his question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion." Isn't that objectively untrue at this point? It's a 4.5 year old question and I don't see any of those things in the responses. –  Doug McClean Mar 13 '13 at 22:22
4  
FYI I've developed an easy-to-use, highly optimized C# priority-queue, which can be found here. It was developed specifically for pathfinding applications (A*, etc.), but should work perfectly for any other application as well. I would post this as an answer, but the question has recently been closed... –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Jul 25 '13 at 20:32
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closed as off-topic by Will Jul 1 '13 at 14:37

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10 Answers

up vote 15 down vote accepted

I like using the OrderedBag and OrderedSet classes in PowerCollections as priority queues.

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29  
OrderedBag/OrderedSet do more work than necessary, they use a red-black tree instead of a heap. –  Dan Berindei Nov 20 '09 at 14:08
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Check out the "C5 Generic Collection Library" http://www.itu.dk/research/c5/

there you can use the IntervalHeap

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1  
This looks to be a very solid library and it comes with 1400 unit tests. –  ECC-Dan Mar 26 '13 at 14:16
    
yes but does not work out of the box –  sebas Oct 25 '13 at 16:32
    
@sebas What doesn't work out of the box? I've used it extensively with much success. Never had problems with it. –  lund.mikkel Jan 7 at 23:43
    
hmm I do not remember...I may have wrote that comment just taking in consideration my personal experience, but I do not remember what was wrong with it. I hope I did not write that comment because I am actually using .net 3.5. –  sebas Jan 8 at 13:13
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here's one i just wrote, maybe it's not as optimized (just uses a sorted dictionary) but simple to understand. you can insert objects of different kinds, so no generic queues.

using System;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Collections;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace PrioQueue
{
    public class PrioQueue
    {
        int total_size;
        SortedDictionary<int, Queue> storage;

        public PrioQueue ()
        {
            this.storage = new SortedDictionary<int, Queue> ();
            this.total_size = 0;
        }

        public bool IsEmpty ()
        {
            return (total_size == 0);
        }

        public object Dequeue ()
        {
            if (IsEmpty ()) {
                throw new Exception ("Please check that priorityQueue is not empty before dequeing");
            } else
                foreach (Queue q in storage.Values) {
                    // we use a sorted dictionary
                    if (q.Count > 0) {
                        total_size--;
                        return q.Dequeue ();
                    }
                }

                Debug.Assert(false,"not supposed to reach here. problem with changing total_size");

                return null; // not supposed to reach here.
        }

        // same as above, except for peek.

        public object Peek ()
        {
            if (IsEmpty ())
                throw new Exception ("Please check that priorityQueue is not empty before peeking");
            else
                foreach (Queue q in storage.Values) {
                    if (q.Count > 0)
                        return q.Peek ();
                }

                Debug.Assert(false,"not supposed to reach here. problem with changing total_size");

                return null; // not supposed to reach here.
        }

        public object Dequeue (int prio)
        {
            total_size--;
            return storage[prio].Dequeue ();
        }

        public void Enqueue (object item, int prio)
        {
            if (!storage.ContainsKey (prio)) {
                storage.Add (prio, new Queue ());
              }
            storage[prio].Enqueue (item);
            total_size++;

        }
    }
}
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this doesnt allow for multiple entries with the same priority though? –  Letseatlunch Apr 16 '11 at 16:39
2  
it does. when you invoke the Enqueue method, it will add the item to the queue of that priority. (the part in else in the enqueue method.) –  better-than-soil Apr 19 '11 at 17:06
3  
What do you mean by "it's not really a priority queue in the computer science meaning"? What about it makes you believe that this isn't a priority queue? –  Mark Byers Feb 23 '12 at 12:30
1  
-1 for not using generics. –  cdiggins Jan 1 '13 at 20:49
13  
"PrioQueue" – You're already typing nine letters. Are the other four really going to make your fingers fall off? –  WCWedin Mar 7 '13 at 15:04
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Here's my attempt at a .NET heap

public abstract class Heap<T> : IEnumerable<T>
{
    private const int InitialCapacity = 0;
    private const int GrowFactor = 2;
    private const int MinGrow = 1;

    private int _capacity = InitialCapacity;
    private T[] _heap = new T[InitialCapacity];
    private int _tail = 0;

    public int Count { get { return _tail; } }
    public int Capacity { get { return _capacity; } }

    protected Comparer<T> Comparer { get; private set; }
    protected abstract bool Dominates(T x, T y);

    protected Heap() : this(Comparer<T>.Default)
    {
    }

    protected Heap(Comparer<T> comparer) : this(Enumerable.Empty<T>(), comparer)
    {
    }

    protected Heap(IEnumerable<T> collection)
        : this(collection, Comparer<T>.Default)
    {
    }

    protected Heap(IEnumerable<T> collection, Comparer<T> comparer)
    {
        if (collection == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("collection");
        if (comparer == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("comparer");

        Comparer = comparer;

        foreach (var item in collection)
        {
            if (Count == Capacity)
                Grow();

            _heap[_tail++] = item;
        }

        for (int i = Parent(_tail - 1); i >= 0; i--)
            BubbleDown(i);
    }

    public void Add(T item)
    {
        if (Count == Capacity)
            Grow();

        _heap[_tail++] = item;
        BubbleUp(_tail - 1);
    }

    private void BubbleUp(int i)
    {
        if (i == 0 || Dominates(_heap[Parent(i)], _heap[i])) 
            return; //correct domination (or root)

        Swap(i, Parent(i));
        BubbleUp(Parent(i));
    }

    public T GetMin()
    {
        if (Count == 0) throw new InvalidOperationException("Heap is empty");
        return _heap[0];
    }

    public T ExtractDominating()
    {
        if (Count == 0) throw new InvalidOperationException("Heap is empty");
        T ret = _heap[0];
        _tail--;
        Swap(_tail, 0);
        BubbleDown(0);
        return ret;
    }

    private void BubbleDown(int i)
    {
        int dominatingNode = Dominating(i);
        if (dominatingNode == i) return;
        Swap(i, dominatingNode);
        BubbleDown(dominatingNode);
    }

    private int Dominating(int i)
    {
        int dominatingNode = i;
        dominatingNode = GetDominating(YoungChild(i), dominatingNode);
        dominatingNode = GetDominating(OldChild(i), dominatingNode);

        return dominatingNode;
    }

    private int GetDominating(int newNode, int dominatingNode)
    {
        if (newNode < _tail && !Dominates(_heap[dominatingNode], _heap[newNode]))
            return newNode;
        else
            return dominatingNode;
    }

    private void Swap(int i, int j)
    {
        T tmp = _heap[i];
        _heap[i] = _heap[j];
        _heap[j] = tmp;
    }

    private static int Parent(int i)
    {
        return (i + 1)/2 - 1;
    }

    private static int YoungChild(int i)
    {
        return (i + 1)*2 - 1;
    }

    private static int OldChild(int i)
    {
        return YoungChild(i) + 1;
    }

    private void Grow()
    {
        int newCapacity = _capacity*GrowFactor + MinGrow;
        var newHeap = new T[newCapacity];
        Array.Copy(_heap, newHeap, _capacity);
        _heap = newHeap;
        _capacity = newCapacity;
    }

    public IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator()
    {
        return _heap.Take(Count).GetEnumerator();
    }

    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return GetEnumerator();
    }
}

public class MaxHeap<T> : Heap<T>
{
    public MaxHeap()
        : this(Comparer<T>.Default)
    {
    }

    public MaxHeap(Comparer<T> comparer)
        : base(comparer)
    {
    }

    public MaxHeap(IEnumerable<T> collection, Comparer<T> comparer)
        : base(collection, comparer)
    {
    }

    public MaxHeap(IEnumerable<T> collection) : base(collection)
    {
    }

    protected override bool Dominates(T x, T y)
    {
        return Comparer.Compare(x, y) >= 0;
    }
}

public class MinHeap<T> : Heap<T>
{
    public MinHeap()
        : this(Comparer<T>.Default)
    {
    }

    public MinHeap(Comparer<T> comparer)
        : base(comparer)
    {
    }

    public MinHeap(IEnumerable<T> collection) : base(collection)
    {
    }

    public MinHeap(IEnumerable<T> collection, Comparer<T> comparer)
        : base(collection, comparer)
    {
    }

    protected override bool Dominates(T x, T y)
    {
        return Comparer.Compare(x, y) <= 0;
    }
}

Some tests:

[TestClass]
public class HeapTests
{
    [TestMethod]
    public void TestHeapBySorting()
    {
        var minHeap = new MinHeap<int>(new[] {9, 8, 4, 1, 6, 2, 7, 4, 1, 2});
        AssertHeapSort(minHeap, minHeap.OrderBy(i => i).ToArray());

        minHeap = new MinHeap<int> { 7, 5, 1, 6, 3, 2, 4, 1, 2, 1, 3, 4, 7 };
        AssertHeapSort(minHeap, minHeap.OrderBy(i => i).ToArray());

        var maxHeap = new MaxHeap<int>(new[] {1, 5, 3, 2, 7, 56, 3, 1, 23, 5, 2, 1});
        AssertHeapSort(maxHeap, maxHeap.OrderBy(d => -d).ToArray());

        maxHeap = new MaxHeap<int> {2, 6, 1, 3, 56, 1, 4, 7, 8, 23, 4, 5, 7, 34, 1, 4};
        AssertHeapSort(maxHeap, maxHeap.OrderBy(d => -d).ToArray());
    }

    private static void AssertHeapSort(Heap<int> heap, IEnumerable<int> expected)
    {
        var sorted = new List<int>();
        while (heap.Count > 0)
            sorted.Add(heap.ExtractDominating());

        Assert.IsTrue(sorted.SequenceEqual(expected));
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Very nice. Seems simple and efficient, just what I was looking for. –  Cameron Apr 17 '13 at 5:23
    
Thanks! Glad you liked it. I have some more similarly implemented data structures if you're interested (most of them posted around SO I think) –  Ohad Schneider Apr 17 '13 at 11:48
1  
+1 for adding fine tests! –  Igor Brejc Mar 14 at 19:39
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I found one by Julian Bucknall on his blog here - http://www.boyet.com/Articles/PriorityQueueCSharp3.html

We modified it slightly so that low-priority items on the queue would eventually 'bubble-up' to the top over time, so they wouldn't suffer starvation.

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You may find useful this implementation: http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/126751/Priority-queue-in-Csharp-with-help-of-heap-data-st.aspx

it is generic and based on heap data structure

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Use a Java to C# translator on the Java implementation (java.util.PriorityQueue) in the Java Collections framework, or more intelligently use the algorithm and core code and plug it into a C# class of your own making that adheres to the C# Collections framework API for Queues, or at least Collections.

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This works, but unfortunately IKVM doesn't support Java generics, so you lose type safety. –  Mechanical snail Nov 8 '12 at 4:34
3  
There is no such thing as "Java generics" when you're dealing with compiled Java bytecode. IKVM can't support it. –  Mark Dec 7 '12 at 21:57
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Here is the another implementation from NGenerics team:

NGenerics PriorityQueue

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I found this answer http://forums.xkcd.com/viewtopic.php?f=11&t=75083 (found on the xkcd forums) to be the quickest and simplest way to implement a priority queue. Emphasis on quickest. It also doesn't require any external libraries. It may not be the fastest or most efficient, but it is definitely the easiest to implement in C# and it works.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
class Node: IComparable<Node>
{
    public int value;

    public Node(int value)
    {
        this.value = value;
    }

    public int CompareTo(Node other)
    {
        return value.CompareTo(other.value);
    }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        List<Node> nodeList = new List<Node>();
        nodeList.Add(new Node(5));
        nodeList.Add(new Node(1));
        nodeList.Add(new Node(2));
        nodeList.Add(new Node(3));
        Node minNode = nodeList.Min();
        Console.WriteLine("MinValue: " + minNode.value);
        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}
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4  
This solution is O(n^2)...so yeah definitely not fast at all. –  theninjagreg Apr 30 '12 at 20:05
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The following implementation of a PriorityQueue uses SortedSet from the System library.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace CDiggins
{
    interface IPriorityQueue<T, K> where K : IComparable<K>
    {
        bool Empty { get; }
        void Enqueue(T x, K key);
        void Dequeue();
        T Top { get; }
    }

    class PriorityQueue<T, K> : IPriorityQueue<T, K> where K : IComparable<K>
    {
        SortedSet<Tuple<T, K>> set;

        class Comparer : IComparer<Tuple<T, K>> {
            public int Compare(Tuple<T, K> x, Tuple<T, K> y) {
                return x.Item2.CompareTo(y.Item2);
            }
        }

        PriorityQueue() { set = new SortedSet<Tuple<T, K>>(new Comparer()); }
        public bool Empty { get { return set.Count == 0;  } }
        public void Enqueue(T x, K key) { set.Add(Tuple.Create(x, key)); }
        public void Dequeue() { set.Remove(set.Max); }
        public T Top { get { return set.Max.Item1; } }
    }
}
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1  
SortedSet.Add will fail (and return false) if you already have an item in the set with the same "priority" as the item you are trying to add. So...if A.Compare(B) == 0 and A is already in the list, your PriorityQueue.Enqueue function will silently fail. –  Joseph Mar 4 '13 at 21:22
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