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I am working on an embedded system and I need to implement a linked list.

So I used a struct to construct a node

typedef struct A
{
   ... //some data
   struct A *next;
   struct A *prev;
} A;

I think on PC (gcc) this works fine. However, the embedded system compiler complains that "identifier A is not declared"...

What is the best solution for this?

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1  
Out of curiosity, which embedded compiler are you using? –  Lundin Apr 20 '12 at 9:13
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3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You should add a separate forward declaration of the struct:

struct A;
typedef struct A
{
    ... //some data
    struct A *next;
    struct A *prev;
} A;

Some compilers do take your definition the way you posted it, but I've seen older compilers that require a separate forward declaration. This may be related to an older standard, or an incomplete standard implementation. In fact, on a project where we needed to write code that runs on five platforms with different compilers, we made it a companywide coding standard requirement to have the forward declaration separate from the struct's typedef.

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thank you so much! It works and that is exactly what I am after –  Alfred Zhong Apr 20 '12 at 3:46
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You can split it out:

typedef struct A A;

struct A {
   ... //some data
   struct A *next;
   struct A *prev;
};
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thanks so much! That is exactly what I am after! –  Alfred Zhong Apr 20 '12 at 3:45
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The original code should compile just fine. You are probably using a non-standard compiler. As an alternative to the other suggestions, you can try this code:

typedef struct a
{
   ... //some data
   struct a *next;
   struct a *prev;
} A;

This way, you shouldn't need a forward declaration.

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Oh btw, if you compile the original code in a C++ compiler, it won't work. C++ handles struct namespaces different than C. –  Lundin Apr 20 '12 at 9:21
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