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Given an array @A we want to check if the element $B is in it. One way is to say this:

Foreach $element (@A){
    if($element eq $B){
        print "$B is in array A";
    }
}

However when it gets to Perl, I am thinking always about the most elegant way. And this is what I am thinking: Is there a way to find out if array A contains B if we convert A to a variable string and use

index(@A,$B)=>0

Is that possible?

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4  
grep { $_ eq $B } @A? –  cHao Apr 20 '12 at 4:55
    

3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

There are many ways to find out whether the element is present in the array or not:

  1. Using foreach

    foreach my $element (@a) {
        if($element eq $b) {
           # do something             
           last;
        }
    }
    
  2. Using Grep:

    my $found = grep { $_ eq $b } @a;
    
  3. Using List::Util module

    use List::Util qw(first); 
    
    my $found = first { $_ eq $b } @a;
    
  4. Using Hash initialised by a Slice

    my %check;
    @check{@a} = ();
    
    my $found = exists $check{$b};
    
  5. Using Hash initialised by map

    my %check = map { $_ => 1 } @a;
    
    my $found = $check{$b};
    
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The List::Util::first() example is (potentially) subtly incorrect when searching for false values, since $found will also evaluate false. (die unless $found ... oops!) List::MoreUtils::any does the right thing here. –  pilcrow May 2 '12 at 19:56
use List::AllUtils qw/ any /;
print "\@A contains $B" if any { $B eq $_ } @A;
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2  
I would recommend first in this case, as it does not have to traverse whole array. It can stop when item is found. –  bvr Apr 20 '12 at 7:43
    
any can stop too because it needs only one element to be true. –  brian d foy Apr 20 '12 at 13:10
    
Beware that first can also return a false value if it finds, e.g., "0", which would confound the example given in this answer. any has the desired semantics. –  pilcrow May 3 '12 at 1:38
use 5.10.1;

$B ~~ @A and say '$B in @A';
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You have to be very careful with this because this distributes the match over the elements. If @A has an array reference element that contains $B, this will still match even though $B isn't a top level element of @A. The smart match is fundamentally broken for this and many other reasons. –  brian d foy Apr 20 '12 at 13:07

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