Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have played a while with ZeroMQ and have couple questions/problems that I came up with. Would appreciate if any contributer to ZeroMQ could chime in or anyone who has used or currently uses the library.

* Let's say I have one router/forwarder and 2 different clients(c1,c2). I want to push messages from client1 to client2 through the routing device. The router pulls messages from whichever client (here client1) and publishes them to any subscribed client (here client2). I currently the only way to route such messages to the appropriate client is through pub/sub, however , a) I want to decide how to route at runtime by sending a routingTo tag along with the message body, b) I want to use push/pull to forward to clients, not pub/sub because I want to implement blocking functionality when setting the high water mark property, c) I want to have c1 and c2 connect on exactly 1 port for pushing and 1 port for subscribing. Can I somehow make changes on the router side in order to not having to use pub/sub or is pub/sub the only way to route to clients even I know on the routing side where a message is supposed to be forwarded to? I read that pub/sub drops messages when queue size exceeds the hwm which I dont want. I also do not want to implement the request/reply patters because it adds unnecessary overhead as I do not need replies.

* After running below code (Push/Pull -> Pub/Sub) and sent all messages and have received confirmation that all messages were received the client that pushed messages out still displays a huge memory footprint, apparently there are still huge amounts of messages in the Push socket's queue. Why is that and what can I do to fix that?

Here is my code:

ROUTER:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        using (var context = new Context(1))
        {
            using (Socket socketIn = context.Socket(SocketType.PULL), socketOut = context.Socket(SocketType.XPUB))
            {
                socketIn.HWM = 10000;
                socketOut.Bind("tcp://*:5560"); //forwards on this port
                socketIn.Bind("tcp://*:5559"); //listens on this port

                Console.WriteLine("Router started and running...");

                while (true)
                {
                    //Receive Message
                    byte[] address = socketIn.Recv();
                    byte[] body = socketIn.Recv();

                    //Forward Message
                    socketOut.SendMore(address);
                    socketOut.Send(body);
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

CLIENT1:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        using (var context = new Context(1))
        {
            using (Socket socketIn = context.Socket(SocketType.SUB), socketOut= context.Socket(SocketType.PUSH))
            {
                byte[] iAM = Encoding.Unicode.GetBytes("Client1");
                byte[] youAre = Encoding.Unicode.GetBytes("Client2");
                byte[] msgBody = new byte[16];

                socketOut.HWM = 10000;
                socketOut.Connect("tcp://localhost:5559");
                socketIn.Connect("tcp://localhost:5560");
                socketIn.Subscribe(iAM);

                Console.WriteLine("Press key to kick off Test Client1 Sending Routine");
                Console.ReadLine();

                for (int counter = 1; counter <= 10000000; counter++)
                {
                    //Send Message
                    socketOut.SendMore(youAre);
                    socketOut.Send(msgBody);
                }

                Console.WriteLine("Client1: Finished Sending");
                Console.ReadLine();
            }
        }
    }
}

CLIENT2:

class Program
{
    public static int msgCounter;

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        msgCounter = 0;

        using (var context = new Context(1))
        {
            using (Socket socketIn = context.Socket(SocketType.SUB), socketOut = context.Socket(SocketType.PUSH))
            {
                byte[] iAM = Encoding.Unicode.GetBytes("Client2");

                socketOut.Connect("tcp://localhost:5559");
                socketIn.Connect("tcp://localhost:5560");
                socketIn.Subscribe(iAM);

                Console.WriteLine("Client2: Started Listening");

                //Receive First Message
                byte[] address = socketIn.Recv();
                byte[] body = socketIn.Recv();
                msgCounter += 1;

                Console.WriteLine("Received first message");

                Stopwatch watch = new Stopwatch();
                watch.Start();

                while (msgCounter < 10000000)
                {
                    //Receive Message
                    address = socketIn.Recv();
                    body = socketIn.Recv();
                    msgCounter += 1;
                }

                watch.Stop();
                Console.WriteLine("Elapsed Time: " + watch.ElapsedMilliseconds + "ms");
                Console.ReadLine();
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'm going to suggest that your architecture may be a bit off here.

1) If you need exactly one PUSH and exactly one PULL, remove the device from the middle. Devices are added to an architecture explicitly to mange multiple consumers so that you don't have to update producers each time you add a node. When/If you do get to where you need multiple consumers and/or producers, you're going to need a connection to each node on your device - that's just how they work. In this case, it sounds as though the device is overly complicating your solution.

2) The idea of having the "route to" tag really boggles my mind. Probably the biggest reason to choose messaging over other integration options is to decouple your producers and consumers so that neither side has to know anything about the other (other than where to send the messages in the case of broker-less designs). Adding routing information directly to your logic breaks this.

As to the overhead, I've never experienced this. But then, I've never used the .Net driver for ZeroMQ before and so an uneducated guess would be to look at the .Net driver itself.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry if I was not clear, the architecture will hold many entities that are producers/consumers at the same time, communicating with any of the other entities in the framework. Thus a point to point channel does not make sense imho because it would introduce way too many channels. 2) I strongly disagree with your notion that routing knowledge is undesirable. I agree that the message body should be segregated from the routing logic, however, as I think I made clear, there are ultimately n entities in the whole framework and each entity knows where it wants to send a specific message. –  Matt Wolf Apr 23 '12 at 7:42
    
Big picture is I want inter process communication between different processes and each process knows which other process to address, thus routing logic makes a lot of sense imho. Blindly sending out messages and having all connected entities pick them up and deciding on the receiving side whether the message received is actually one that is supposed to be processed by such entity is a huge waste of bandwidth and computing power. –  Matt Wolf Apr 23 '12 at 7:47
    
Ah. Apologies then. The original post led me to believe that you in fact only had two client nodes you were attempting to integrate with a router in the middle. Perhaps the "routeTo" is mere semantics I got hung up on. Would it be accurate to describe your "routeTo" as a "topic" that your router is using to make routing decisions on? If so, I can edit the above answer to address with new understanding. I'll leave the original reply as well so that folks coming to this thread have the whole context when they read this. –  Shaun Apr 23 '12 at 15:11
    
Hi Shaun, yes the routeTo is only used in order to have the router forward messages to those subscribers that submitted a matching subscription. Please note I subsequently changed the client code to now subscribe through XSUB socket (previously SUB) and filtering on the router side works now. However, I still only see this work with Pub/Sub, not any other socket type. –  Matt Wolf Apr 23 '12 at 15:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.