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When I run in debug mode my program, it pops a NullReferenceException on an object which isn't null - it appears as defined in the Locals view. The object in question is SFML.Graphics.Sprite, and only one of it's fields is null (myInverseTransform), but when I checked other Sprites, they were null there, too.

Does anyone know what can cause this, or how can I find what is the null object that the exception refers to?

this is the picture of it

The relevant code:

here's the code:

(in Sprite:)

public void Draw(RenderTarget target, RenderStates states)

{

    states.Transform *= Transform;

    RenderStates.MarshalData marshaledStates = states.Marshal();

            if (target is RenderWindow)
            {
                sfRenderWindow_drawSprite(((RenderWindow)target).CPointer, CPointer, ref marshaledStates);
            }
            else if (target is RenderTexture)
            {
                sfRenderTexture_drawSprite(((RenderTexture)target).CPointer, CPointer, ref marshaledStates);
            }
        }

(in Transform:)

        public static Transform operator *(Transform left, Transform right)
        {
            return new Transform(left).Combine(right);
        }

        public Transform Combine(Transform transform)
        {
            sfTransform_combine(CPointer, transform.CPointer);
            return this;
        }
            else if (target is RenderTexture)
            {
                sfRenderTexture_drawSprite(((RenderTexture)target).CPointer, CPointer, ref marshaledStates);
            }
        }

The problem that while calling Sprite.Draw this.Transform is defined (according to the Locals view), but in Transform's * operator the right variable is null;

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Show your code,problem can be with local and global variable –  Likurg Apr 20 '12 at 6:17
    
Looks like some sort of a defect in SFML - a null variable is being accessed internally and it's just not showing you in any more depth because it does not have access to the source code for SFML. –  Sander Apr 20 '12 at 6:25
    
I went deeper into Draw, but what I got is that in an internal call (Sprite.Draw) there's a line which says states.Transform *= Transform, and in the * operator it says that the right Transform is null, but in Sprite.Draw this.Transform isn't null, so it's still the same question. –  nihohit Apr 20 '12 at 7:54

2 Answers 2

It's not claiming that your variable value is null. (An object can't be null - a variable can have a null value though. There's a big difference.) It's just saying that a NullReferenceException occurred. It could be a bug in the SFML library, for example. You should look at the stack trace to find out exactly where the exception is being thrown, and go from there.

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Hm, weren't all variables objects in C#? –  Mr Lister Apr 20 '12 at 6:20
1  
@MrLister: No. There are separate concepts here - a variable, its value (which in this case would be a reference) and an object (which the value refers to). It's well worth distinguishing between them. A "piece of paper with my address written on it" is not the same as "my address", and "my address" is not the same as "my house". –  Jon Skeet Apr 20 '12 at 6:23
    
See the comment to the question I just now added. I went deeper, and it's a case of a non-null variable being passed as null. –  nihohit Apr 20 '12 at 7:56
    
@nihohit: Okay, but not you're talking about code we can't see, in a situation we can't see. We can't really help you without more information. Chances are you're not really passing the variable you think you are (e.g. due to a local variable hiding an instance variable) but it's hard to say without the code. –  Jon Skeet Apr 20 '12 at 8:04
    
uploaded the SFML code to the main question. –  nihohit Apr 20 '12 at 9:17

Most likely you'll find that the problem is located within Draw() method, where something is trying to access members at a null variable - it could even be a local variable within the method.

You could try to compile SFML (is it open-source?) yourself and use that copy to see exactly what goes wrong.

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