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I'm having hard time understanding where some values in my buffer are coming from and why I'm getting System.ExecutionEngineException.

Here is my case: In my system I have a native application that talks to a managed service through named pipes. The native application uses WriteFile(pipehandle, &msg, sizeof(msg), &cbBytes, NULL) to send data held by the following structs:

struct NotificationMessageHeader
{
    __int32 A;
    __int64 B;
    __int32 MessageType;
    __int32 D;
};

struct NotificationMessageA
{
    NotificationMessageHeader Header;
    unsigned char X;
    wchar_t Y[MAX_PATH];
};

The managed service has these structures' managed versions, that look as following:

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
public struct NotificationMessageHeader
{
    public UInt32 A;
    public UInt64 B;
    public UInt32 MessageType;
    public UInt32 D;
}

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
public struct NotificationMessageA
{
    public NotificationMessageHeader Header;
    [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.I1)]
    public byte X;
    [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPWStr)]
    public string Y;
}

When I'm sending data from the native application, the first thing I do is read the buffer into a generic structure:

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential, CharSet = CharSet.Unicode)]
public struct GenericNotificationMessage
{
    public NotificationMessageHeader Header;
}

to determine what is the message type and after I'm sure that the message type is supported I decode the rest of that buffer as the appropriate structure using this function:

    T GetMessageAsStructure<T>(object data)
        where T : struct
    {
        T output = default(T);
        GCHandle handle = GCHandle.Alloc(data, GCHandleType.Pinned);
        try
        {
            IntPtr dataPtr = handle.AddrOfPinnedObject();
            output = (T)Marshal.PtrToStructure(dataPtr, typeof(T));
        }
        finally
        {
            handle.Free();
        }
        return output;
    }

Again - there are two calls to GetMessageAsStructure. One as a type argument gets GenericNotificationMessage that decodes only the header and it works correctly - I'm getting the values in the header field as expected. Then, in case I find out that the message is of type that I support I call GetMessageAsStructure with the type parameter - in this case NotificationMessageA.

... And here things start going bad. CLR fails with access violation exception. I tried to look at the values in the buffer that I have on the managed side and for example when I send something like:

    NotificationMessageA msg = { };
    memset(&msg, 0, sizeof(msg));

    msg.Header.A = 2;
            msg.Header.B = 999;
    msg.Header.MessageType = 1;
    msg.Header.D = 3;
    msg.X = 64;
    wcscpy(msg.Y, L"somexec.exe");

    DWORD written = 0;
    WriteFile(_hPipe, &msg, sizeof(msg), &written, NULL);

The managed buffer has the following values:

[0] 2 <---- This shouldn't be at index 3?
[1] 0
[2] 0
[3] 0
[4] 0
[5] 0
[6] 0
[7] 0
[8] 231 <--- WTF is this? should't it start at index 11?
[9] 3
[10] 0
[11] 0
[12] 0
[13] 0
[14] 0
[15] 0
[16] 1
[17] 0
[18] 0
[19] 0
[20] 3
[21] 0
[22] 0
[23] 0
[24] 64
[25] 0
[26] 115
[27] 0
[28] 111
[29] 0
[30] 109
[31] 0
[32] 101
[33] 0
[34] 101
[35] 0
[36] 120
[37] 0
[38] 101
[39] 0
[40] 99
[41] 0
[42] 46
[43] 0
[44] 101
[45] 0
[46] 120
[47] 0
[48] 101
[49] 0
[50] 0

I though that maybe I'm getting some garbage in there because I'm using the = { } which in C++ does memberwise initialization to default value and doesn't affect alignment-padded structures, but that is not the case, because even using memset(..., 0, ...) isn't affecting the received bytes.

Plus the header alone is decoded perfectly, only when I'm trying to decode the rest of the structure, that has a string I'm getting System.ExecutionEngineException.

Also the managed buffer doesn't hold what I'm expecting it to have there by looking at my structures - .

Why?

What is more puzzling is that Visual Studio reports that what was thrown was ExecutionEngineException, and MSDN says that this exception is not thrown by the runtime anymore and it's obsolete.

What I'm doing wrong while deserializing that string?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your are marshalling NotificationMessageA.Y as a pointer, but in the native code it is a buffer inside the structure, not a pointer, you should use UnmanagedType.ByValTStr

share|improve this answer
    
Worked perfectly! Thank you. –  Karim Agha Jan 9 '13 at 4:25

In addition to MiMo's answer:

Index 0 to 3: MessageHeader.A, little endian
Index 4 to 7: padding, since B must be 8 byte aligned
Index 8 to 15: B, little endian
...
Index 24: X
Index 25: padding
Index 26: start of the wchar_t array Y, but will be incorrectly interpreted as a pointer
share|improve this answer
    
It makes sense now... Thanks! –  Karim Agha Jan 9 '13 at 4:26

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