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def recursive_add(s):
    sum = 0
    if len(s) == 1:
        sum += s[0] ** 2
    else:
        recursive_add(s[1:])
        sum += s[0]**2
    return sum


s = [8, 6, 8, 4]

print recursive_add(s)

however, for some reason, 8 gets squared right away and 64 is returned, even though it should be the last number to be squared and added to sum.

share|improve this question
    
You throw away the result of the recursive call to recursive_add. I bet this is not what you intended to do. –  rkhayrov Apr 20 '12 at 7:38
    
this has homework written all over it –  Gwyn Howell Apr 20 '12 at 7:50
    
actually it's not homework...i'm just working ahead since we're going to need it for the final next month –  VPNTIME Apr 20 '12 at 7:54
    
okay, apologies! –  Gwyn Howell Apr 20 '12 at 8:00
    
You say that "8 gets squared right away and 64 is returned". Actually, that's not what happens. Since you don't know what happens, I suggest you add print statements to find out. Since comment boxes don't work well for code, I'll post an answer with example code. –  steveha Apr 20 '12 at 8:07

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted
def recursive_add(s):
    if s:
        return s[0]**2 + recursive_add(s[1:])
    else:
        return 0
share|improve this answer
    
My favorite answer so far. It is self-contained with no need for an external global, and the way it breaks down the list and adds as it goes is very clear. –  steveha Apr 20 '12 at 8:02

First, an one-liner solution for your specific problem:

def rec_add(s):
    return s[0] * s[0] + rec_add(s[1:]) if s else 0

More advanced and abstract stuff follows.

In functional programming jargon, you "map" x**2 on a list and "fold" the list by adding its elements together. Python provides necessary primitives for that (map and reduce respectively) and the sum of squares can be simply written as:

from operator import add, mul

xs = [1,2,3,5]
print reduce(add, map(mul, xs, xs)) # 39

You can also combine map and fold steps in one function:

def map_and_fold(xs, mapfun, foldfun, init):
    if not xs:
        return init
    return foldfun(
        mapfun(xs[0]),
        map_and_fold(
            xs[1:], mapfun, foldfun, init))

and define sum_squares as a partial application of the above:

from functools import partial

sum_squares = partial(map_and_fold, 
    mapfun = lambda x: x * x,
    foldfun = lambda x, y: x + y,
    init = 0)

Test:

xs = [1,2,3,5]
print sum_squares(xs) # 39

More info: map, fold, partial application.

share|improve this answer
    
In case you decide to go with reduce and map : list_add_squares = lambda list : reduce(add, map(mul, list, list)) –  Arnab Datta Apr 20 '12 at 10:05
    
I like the idea of doing from operator import mul sum(map(mul,s,s)) –  jamylak Apr 20 '12 at 18:06
    
@jamylak: well, in real-life python sum(x * x for x in xs) would be fine, but the point of my answer was to explain some functional programming concepts. –  georg Apr 20 '12 at 18:42
    
a groundberaking definition of "one-liner" –  miracle173 Nov 30 '12 at 9:54

You can just:

def recursive_add(s):
    return s and (recursive_add(s[1:]) + s[0]**2) or 0

In your original code, the issue seems to be that recursive_add(s[1:]) doesn't share the same sum with recursive_add(s). The sums are different ones. Try this instead:

sum = 0

def recursive_add(s):
    global sum
    if len(s) == 1:
        sum += s[0] ** 2
    else:
        recursive_add(s[1:])
        sum += s[0]**2

s = [8, 6, 8, 4]

print recursive_add(s)
share|improve this answer
    
Don't use and / or, Python has a real conditional expression / ternary operation. recursive_add(s[1:]) + s[0]**2 if s else 0. –  agf May 8 '12 at 16:45

When you are trying to figure out why your program isn't working correctly, it is good to figure out exactly what it is doing. Here is an example of how to modify your program to show what it's really doing.

def recursive_add(s):
    print "DEBUG: recursive_add(%s)" % repr(s)
    sum = 0
    print "DEBUG: sum: %d" % sum
    if len(s) == 1:
        sum += s[0] ** 2
        print "DEBUG: sum: %d" % sum
    else:
        recursive_add(s[1:])
        sum += s[0]**2
        print "DEBUG: sum: %d" % sum
    return sum


s = [8, 6, 8, 4]

print "result: %d" % recursive_add(s)

When you run this, here is what you get:

DEBUG: recursive_add([8, 6, 8, 4])
DEBUG: sum: 0
DEBUG: recursive_add([6, 8, 4])
DEBUG: sum: 0
DEBUG: recursive_add([8, 4])
DEBUG: sum: 0
DEBUG: recursive_add([4])
DEBUG: sum: 0
DEBUG: sum: 16
DEBUG: sum: 64
DEBUG: sum: 36
DEBUG: sum: 64
result: 64

As you can see, your function does successfully snip the first number off the list, and calls itself recursively until it has handled all the numbers. But the problem is that you keep re-setting sum to 0, so sum isn't accumulating an actual sum; so your final answer is 0 + 64, or just 64.

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Your code does not what you want. In very first place, declare sum = 0 into recursive_add will lead to a different behaviour respect of that you expected.

I suggest to modify it in

def recursive_add(s,sum):
 if len(s) == 1:
  return sum + s[0] ** 2
 else:
  sum = s[0] ** 2 + recursive_add(s[1:],sum)
 return sum

And call it in that way

s = [8, 6, 8, 4]
print recursive_add(s,0)
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