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There is 30 files, any one contains about 100,000 data items, the data item just like this: key->count,for example, abcdefg->100, which means the key 'abcdefg' 's count value is 100, the key can just appeared in one file one time, but it could appeared in other files.

How should I get the 10 keys, its total count value should in all the top 10 from 30 files.

any help would be greatly appreciated.

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The key may be appeared in mutiple files ,so its total count value is the total sum of all the values.Which makes the problem complex. – user1345880 Apr 20 '12 at 8:32
    
The solution should has a strict time limit,the shorter the better. – user1345880 Apr 20 '12 at 9:22
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Is there a reason why the data cannot be loaded to memory? 100,000 * 30 integers are ~11.5MB, Will a solution that loads the counts into memory be Ok? also - what is the expected size of each key? If it is not long, the entire dataset might be populated in memory – amit Apr 20 '12 at 9:26
    
This doesn't sound like a huge amount of data at all. Is there some resource constraint you're not mentioning? – Michael J. Barber Apr 20 '12 at 9:32
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Also: I get the 10 keys, its total count value should in all the top 10 from 30 files Are you looking for the 10 keys that the sum of counts is maximal? or keys that appear in the top 10 of all documents - these two might not be the same. – amit Apr 20 '12 at 9:36
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I am assuming you want the 10 keys with maximal total count [which seems to be true according to your first comment]

Design Guidelines:

  • Since the data is not too large [100,000 * 30 integers on 32 bits system are ~11.5 MB], and assuming the key is not too large1, the entire data set might be populated into memory.
  • When the data is in memory - you can do anything much faster on it, since disk IO is extremely slower then RAM, so sorting it and reading it multiple times is expected to be much slower then manipulating the data on memory.

Algorithm :

  1. Create a histogram, which will actually be a HashMap:key->int, which will be populated while you are reading the files. For each key you are reading, if it is already in the histogram - add the count to the existing value in the histogram, and if it doesn't exist - just add the (key,count) pair to the histogram. [O(n) average run time]
  2. Once the histogram is populated - finding the top 10 is easy - create a min heap, and iterate the histogram, the heap should always contain the top 10 values, and the matching keys - of course. There is an explanation how to do it in this thread. - for constant top10, it is O(n) as well.
  3. When you are done - the heap contains your solution, just show its content.

Advantages:

  • only one disk read - since the disk is much slower then RAM - this will probably be the bottleneck - so minimizing the disk reads/writes should be a priority.
  • O(n) average run time.

Disadvantage:

  • If you have very poor hash function [unlikely] - due to the hash table, the solution might decay to quadric time complexity.
  • More work should be done if the keys are large and do not fit in memory - see footnote (1) how it can be solved.

1: If the assumption is not true, it can be partially solved by hashing the keys, and storing only the keys. Check for equality once you have hash collision - in the disk itself. It will increase the number of reads, but the number of collisions should be relatively low, with a good hash function. Also, you should load the the keys that their hash collided to memory [again, to avoid multiple disk reads], and only them, it will be a much smaller number then the total number of elements.

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I would try the following:

  1. Sort (using quick sort for example) each file by key (be careful what you use to compare strings) - O(nlogn).
  2. Merge all files into one by key summing up count values for equal keys (using Merge routine from merge sort - O(n)). You'll get a huge hash with unique keys.
  3. Sort your hash by count value - O(nlogn).
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Thank you very much! But I think that you may be didn't completely understand me.The key may be appeared in mutiple files ,so its total count value is the total sum of all the values.Which makes the problem complex. – user1345880 Apr 20 '12 at 8:31
    
No, I got your point right. When you do merging of 2 files sorted by key you compare keys. If 2 keys are equal - you add just 1 item to the resulting collection summing up their values: key -> count1+count2. Does it make sense? – Kniganapolke Apr 20 '12 at 8:36
    
Thank you!I know.Is there any other solutions? The solution should has a strict time limit,the shorter the better. – user1345880 Apr 20 '12 at 8:48
    
In this case you need to look for an efficient solution, otherwise you may end up waiting for 30 hrs to get the results. – Kniganapolke Apr 20 '12 at 8:59
  1. sort each files by key. If the key cannot be compared... skip this answer~~~
  2. well now u have multiple sorted files, and your comparison rules. Try multi way merging. Take this carefully, when u merge each key in all files, follow the key's order and sum the count. At the same time, create a heap to maintain the top 10 keys by now. After the merge is done, the heap have the top 10 keys.
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