Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
Javascript closure inside loops - simple practical example

Seen many posts talking about setTimeout and closures but I'm still not able to pass in a simple for loop counter.

for (i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
  setTimeout(function () {
    console.log(i);
  }, Math.floor(Math.random() * 1000));
}

Gives

5
5
5
5
5

Would like to have

0
1
2
3
4

What's wrong ?
Please don't flame, I thought I have understood the setTimeout() tale but apparently not.

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Felix Kling, James Allardice, Yoshi, Lion, Daniel Fischer Apr 20 '12 at 12:32

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Maybe the specificity here is the random() isn't it ? –  Pierre de LESPINAY Apr 20 '12 at 7:57
    
Nope. You get the same problem with a fixed timeout. –  Felix Kling Apr 20 '12 at 8:00
    
The exactly same thing was asked yesterday. Please, check How to pass a variable into a setTimeout function? –  ZER0 Apr 20 '12 at 8:03
    
I didn't see this one, but there is still no random in the setTimeout delay (that I was thinking to be the difference) –  Pierre de LESPINAY Apr 20 '12 at 8:05
1  
No, the problem is that you are creating a function inside a loop. Whether setTimeout is involved or not, with a random timeout or not, is irrelevant. –  Felix Kling Apr 20 '12 at 8:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can use a closure to keep a reference to the current value of i within the loop:

for (i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
    (function(i) {
        setTimeout(function () {
            console.log(i);
        }, Math.floor(Math.random() * 1000));
    })(i); //Pass current value into self-executing anonymous function
}​

However, this is unlikely to print the numbers in order since you use a random timeout (you could use i * 1000 instead to make the numbers print in ascending order, one second apart).

Here's a working example.

share|improve this answer
    
Is there a reason to re-use the name 'i' for the function parameter? I noticed that @JamieDixon does the same thing. To me that obscures the fact that they are completely separate variables and makes it more complicated to understand. Forked your jsfiddle as an example: jsfiddle.net/RnN6r –  Jeremy Wiebe Jun 19 '12 at 12:35
    
@JeremyWiebe - No, there's no reason, you can use any identifier you like. I tend to use the same name because I find it clearer, but each to their own. –  James Allardice Jun 19 '12 at 12:38

You need to pass i to the function being used in the setTimeout. By the time your first method is executed, i is already set to 5.

Since your timeout is variable due to the call to Math.Random(), the timeouts will be different and you won't get them in the sequence you're expecting.

Here's a working example

for (i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
    (function(i) {
        setTimeout(function () {
            console.log(i);
        }, 1000);
    })(i);
}

Changing Math.floor(Math.random() * 1000) to simply 1000 ensures that the functions execute in the order you're expecting.

share|improve this answer

You need to wrap the "interesting" code in a function that closes over i and copies it in a local variable:

for (i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
  (function() {
    var j = i;
    setTimeout(function () {
      console.log(j);
    }, Math.floor(Math.random() * 1000));
  })();
}

The "intermediate" function call forces the value of j to be fixed at the point that function is called, so within each setTimeout callback the value of j is different.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.