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I was curious what kind of buffer sizes write() and read() could handle on Linux/OSX/FreeBSD, so I started playing around with dumb programs like the following:

#include <unistd.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>

int main( void ) {
    size_t s = 8*1024*1024 - 16*1024;
    while( 1 ) {
        s += 1024;
        int f = open( "test.txt", O_CREAT | O_WRONLY | O_TRUNC, S_IRUSR | S_IWUSR | S_IXUSR );
        char mem[s];
        size_t written = write( f, &mem[0], s );
        close( f );
        printf( "(%ld) %lu\n", sizeof(size_t), written );
    }
    return 0;
}

This allowed me to test how close to a seeming "8MB barrier" I could get before segfaulting. Somewhere around the 8MB mark, my program dies, here's an example output:

(8) 8373248
(8) 8374272
(8) 8375296
(8) 8376320
(8) 8377344
(8) 8378368
(8) 8379392
(8) 8380416
(8) 8381440
(8) 8382464
Segmentation fault: 11

This is the same on OSX and Linux, however my FreeBSD VM is not only much faster at running this test, it also can go on for quite a ways! I've successfully tested it up to 511MB, which is just a ridiculous amount of data to write in one call.

What is it that makes the write() call segfault, and how can I figure out the maximum amount that I can possibly write() in a single call, without doing something ridiculous like I'm doing right now?

(Note, all three operating systems are 64-bit, OSX 10.7.3, Ubuntu 11.10, FreeBSD 9.0)

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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The fault isn't within write(), it's a stack overflow. Try this:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>

int main( void )
{
    void *mem;
    size_t s = 512*1024*1024 - 16*1024;
    while( 1 )
    {
        s += 1024;
        int f = open( "test.txt", O_CREAT | O_WRONLY | O_TRUNC, S_IRUSR | S_IWUSR | S_IXUSR );
        mem = malloc(s);
        size_t written = write( f, mem, s );
        free(mem);
        close( f );
        printf( "(%ld) %lu\n", sizeof(size_t), written );
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
sigh I really should have realized that. I thought about it, and then promptly forgot to think before compiling. Thank you! –  staticfloat Apr 20 '12 at 8:36
    
@staticfloat I tried to see if I could prove it was a stack overflow using strace and gdb but I couldn't - perhaps someone could suggest how a stack overflow can be definitively determined to be the cause of a fault. –  trojanfoe Apr 20 '12 at 8:44
    
In case you were wondering, that actually did fix the problem. :) –  staticfloat Apr 23 '12 at 4:37

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