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I noticed some extreme delays in my Ruby (1.9) scripts and after some digging it boiled down to regular expression matching. I'm using the following test scripts in Perl and in Ruby:

Perl:

$fname = shift(@ARGV);
open(FILE, "<$fname" );
while (<FILE>) {
    if ( /(.*?) \|.*?SENDING REQUEST.*?TID=(.*?),/ ) {
        print "$1: $2\n";
    }
}

Ruby:

f = File.open( ARGV.shift )
while ( line = f.gets )
    if /(.*?) \|.*?SENDING REQUEST.*?TID=(.*?),/.match(line)
        puts "#{$1}: #{$2}"
    end
end

I use the same input for both scripts, a file with only 44290 lines. The timing for each one is:

Perl:

xenofon@cpm:~/bin/local/project$ time ./try.pl input >/dev/null

real    0m0.049s
user    0m0.040s
sys     0m0.000s

Ruby:

xenofon@cpm:~/bin/local/project$ time ./try.rb input >/dev/null

real    1m5.106s
user    1m4.910s
sys     0m0.010s

I guess I'm doing something awfully stupid, any suggestions?

Thank you

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2  
Have you tried if line =~ /(.*?) \|.*?SENDING REQUEST.*?TID=(.*?),/? That also works in Ruby, I'd be curious if it has different performance characteristics. –  Michael Kohl Apr 20 '12 at 9:42
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6 Answers 6

regex = Regexp.new(/(.*?) \|.*?SENDING REQUEST.*?TID=(.*?),/)

f = File.open( ARGV.shift ).each do |line|
    if regex .match(line)
        puts "#{$1}: #{$2}"
    end
end

Or

regex = Regexp.new(/(.*?) \|.*?SENDING REQUEST.*?TID=(.*?),/)

f = File.open( ARGV.shift )
f.each_line do |line|
  if regex.match(line)
    puts "#{$1}: #{$2}"
  end
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+1 I found that Perl is doing this automatically. –  stema Apr 20 '12 at 9:49
3  
I tried your suggestion, but there was no change, execution time is still 1m5.134s –  xpapad Apr 20 '12 at 10:06
2  
A few nitpicks: you need to free the file descriptor after you're done with it, either by calling close or by using File.open('filename') { |file| }, which ensures the file is closed. Also, /#{...}/ denotes a Regexp literal; the call Regexp.new is unnecessary. –  Matheus Moreira Apr 20 '12 at 11:44
    
@stema What is Perl doing automatically? –  texasbruce Apr 20 '12 at 19:32
1  
@texasbruce: When perl (the interpreter) discovers a constant regular expression, it compiles and caches it for reuse. This is as opposed to most other languages, where this step must be done manually by the programmer. (See stema's answer.) –  Robert P Apr 20 '12 at 19:43
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One possible difference is the amount of backtracking being performed. Perl might do a better job of pruning the search tree when backtracking (i.e. noticing when part of a pattern can't possibly match). Its regex engine is highly optimised.

First, adding a leading «^» could make a huge difference. If the pattern doesn't match starting at position 0, it's not going to match at starting position 1 either! So don't try to match at position 1.

Along the same lines, «.*?» isn't as limiting as you might think, and replacing each instance of it with a more limiting pattern could prevent a lot of backtracking.

Why don't you try:

/
    ^
    (.*?)                       [ ]\|
    (?:(?!SENDING[ ]REQUEST).)* SENDING[ ]REQUEST
    (?:(?!TID=).)*              TID=
    ([^,]*)                     ,
/x

(Not sure if it was safe to replace the first «.*?» with «[^|]», so I didn't.)

(At least for patterns that match a single string, (?:(?!PAT).) is to PAT as [^CHAR] is to CHAR.)

Using /s could possibly speed things up if «.» is allowed to match newlines, but I think it's pretty minor.

Using «\space» instead of «[space]» to match a space under /x might be slightly faster in Ruby. (They're the same in recent versions of Perl.) I used the latter because it's far more readable.

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@xpapad, Tweaked my answer. –  ikegami Apr 20 '12 at 19:21
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From the perlretut chapter: Using regular expressions in Perl section - "Search and replace"

(Even though the regular expression appears in a loop, Perl is smart enough to compile it only once.)

I don't know Ruby very good, but I suspect that it does compile the regex in each cycle.
(Try the code from LaGrandMere's answer to verfiy it).

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Ruby:

File.open(ARGV.shift).each do |line|
    if line =~ /(.*?) \|.*?SENDING REQUEST.*?TID=(.*?),/
        puts "#{$1}: #{$2}"
    end
end

Change match method to =~ operator. It is faster because:

(Ruby has Benchmark. I don't know your file content so I randomly typed something)

require 'benchmark'

def bm(n)
    Benchmark.bm do |x|
    x.report{n.times{"asdfajdfaklsdjfklajdklfj".match(/fa/)}}
    x.report{n.times{"asdfajdfaklsdjfklajdklfj" =~ /fa/}}
    x.report{n.times{/fa/.match("asdfajdfaklsdjfklajdklfj")}}
    end
end

bm(100000)

Output report:

       user     system      total        real
   0.141000   0.000000   0.141000 (  0.140564)
   0.047000   0.000000   0.047000 (  0.046855)
   0.125000   0.000000   0.125000 (  0.124945)

The middle one is using =~. It takes less than 1/3 of others. Other two are using match method. So, use =~ in your code.

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I tried =~ instead of match, no change in the performance. –  xpapad Apr 24 '12 at 8:41
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Regular expression matching is time-consuming compared to other forms of matching. Since you are expecting a long, static string in the middle of your matching lines, try filtering out lines that don't include that string by using relatively-cheap string operations. That should result in less that needs to go through regular expression parsing (depending on what your input looks like, of course).

f = File.open( ARGV.shift )
my_re = Regexp.new(/(.*?) \|.*?SENDING REQUEST.*?TID=(.*?),/)
while ( line = f.gets )
    continue if line.index('SENDING REQUEST') == nil
    if my_re.match(line)
        puts "#{$1}: #{$2}"
    end
end
f.close()

I haven't benchmarked this particular version since I don't have your input data. I have had success doing things like this in the past, though, especially with lengthy logfiles where pre-filtering can eliminate the vast majority of the input without running any regular expressions.

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Try using the (?>re) Extension. See Ruby-Documentation for Details, here a Quote:

This construct [..] inhibits backtracking, which can be a performance enhancement. For example, the pattern /a.*b.*a/ takes exponential time when matched against a string containing an a followed by a number of bs, but with no trailing a. However, this can be avoided by using a nested regular expression /a(?>.*b).*a/.

File.open(ARGV.shift) do |f|
  while line = f.gets
    if /(.*?)(?> \|.*?SENDING REQUEST.*?TID=)(.*?),/.match(line)
      puts "#{$1}: #{$2}"
    end
  end
end
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