Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

im developing an application that has two JPanels. The first JPanel is used as a drawing board and the second is used as a property/settings panel. So the drawing board should use active rendering and the second one passive. They are both added to a JFrame.

I've been reading about active rendering in java but i've noticed that JPanel doesnt support createBufferStrategy. Does this mean i need to use a canvas? The problem with canvas is that it is not a container so i can't add components to it. I could also use the JFrame buffered strategy (but then i would have to fix the position offset due to the title?).. Could i use a JPanel to actively render on but still have the second JPanel use passive rendering?

share|improve this question
    
First of all - i don't see any point in using active rendering with standard Swing components. They have passive rendering to optimize repaint speed and minimize interface response time. Active rendering is actually needed only if you are going to paint something specific (for e.g. pinball game area). So basically, why do you want to use active rendering? –  Mikle Garin Apr 20 '12 at 12:54
1  
its an editor, where one side is the drawing area and the other side are settings. The drawing area supports animations.. thats why.. An example would be to right click on the drawing area and draw a options menu for the selected element. Creating a custom drawn menu would be a overkill.. –  blejzz Apr 20 '12 at 14:36
    
In that case you can just use any JComponent ancestor to paint animation and put other components onto it. I will add a specific example a bit later as an anwer... –  Mikle Garin Apr 20 '12 at 15:41

1 Answer 1

Here is some example of combining "passive" Swing components and active animation:

public static void main ( String[] args )
{
    JFrame frame = new JFrame ();

    JPanel view = new JPanel ( null );
    view.setPreferredSize ( new Dimension ( 500, 500 ) );
    frame.add ( view );

    JButton button1 = new JButton ( "Button 1" );
    button1.setBounds ( 10, 10, 100, 40 );
    button1.setOpaque ( false );
    view.add ( button1 );

    Animator animator = new Animator ();
    animator.setBounds ( 0, 0, 500, 500 );
    view.add ( animator );

    JButton button2 = new JButton ( "Button 2" );
    button2.setBounds ( 390, 450, 100, 40 );
    button2.setOpaque ( false );
    view.add ( button2 );

    frame.setResizable ( false );
    frame.setDefaultCloseOperation ( JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE );
    frame.pack ();
    frame.setLocationRelativeTo ( null );
    frame.setVisible ( true );
}

public static class Animator extends JComponent
{
    private float angle = 0;

    public Animator ()
    {
        super ();
        setOpaque ( false );

        new Timer ( 1000 / 24, new ActionListener ()
        {
            public void actionPerformed ( ActionEvent e )
            {
                angle += 0.2f;
                if ( angle > 360 )
                {
                    angle = 0;
                }

                repaint ();
            }
        } ).start ();

        addMouseListener ( new MouseAdapter ()
        {
            //
        } );
    }

    protected void paintComponent ( Graphics g )
    {
        super.paintComponent ( g );

        Graphics2D g2d = ( Graphics2D ) g;
        g2d.setRenderingHint ( RenderingHints.KEY_ANTIALIASING,
                RenderingHints.VALUE_ANTIALIAS_ON );

        GeneralPath shape = getShape ();

        g2d.setPaint ( Color.BLACK );
        g2d.fill ( shape );
    }

    public boolean contains ( int x, int y )
    {
        return getShape ().contains ( x, y );
    }

    private GeneralPath getShape ()
    {
        GeneralPath gp = new GeneralPath ( GeneralPath.WIND_EVEN_ODD );
        gp.append ( new Rectangle2D.Double ( -250, 150, 1000, 200 ), false );

        AffineTransform at = new AffineTransform ();
        at.rotate ( angle * Math.PI / 90, 250, 250 );
        gp.transform ( at );
        return gp;
    }
}

As you can see the black rotated area not just overlays the bottom right button, but also blocks mouse events on the covered with stripe button's part. That happens due to overriden Animator's contains() method:

public boolean contains ( int x, int y )
{
    return getShape ().contains ( x, y );
}

By default component catches mouse events over the whole bounds in the parent, but by changing this method you can play with that the way you like.

Also there could be done a lot of optimizations, for e.g. saving the shape after each repaint to some variable and return it when checking "contains" value.

Anyway hope this helps atleast a bit in your question...

share|improve this answer
1  
I think that not, but code look like good +1 –  mKorbel Apr 20 '12 at 18:29
    
Well i don't get your question then. You wanted some passive rendering mixed with active - here it is (and even on the same panel). If you want some fully painted menu - you just need to paint it in paintComponent method and put some handles (mouse/key listeners) to that component to react on various events - nothing more. –  Mikle Garin Apr 20 '12 at 18:51
1  
you misunderstood my question. The first JPanel - the drawing panel - is running some sort of a game engine (its not using JComponents because it would be a overkill). The second JPanel is a form with input fields and buttons. And i would like to use BufferStrategy (since it supports hardware accelerated page fliping) on the first panel without using a canvas (so i can add right click menu). So my question is how can i make active rendering on a jpanel (with bufferStrategy) and without using Canvas –  blejzz Apr 20 '12 at 20:54
2  
Now i get it. Well, not sure about BufferStrategy... Will see if i find out something useful. –  Mikle Garin Apr 21 '12 at 10:31

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.