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I am solving problem 9 on the Project Euler. In my solution I use a "goto" statement to break out of two for loops. The Problem is the following:

A Pythagorean triplet is a set of three natural numbers, a b c, for which,

a^2 + b^2 = c^2

For example, 3^2 + 4^2 = 9 + 16 = 25 = 52.

There exists exactly one Pythagorean triplet for which a + b + c = 1000. Find the product abc.

My solution is in c++:

int a,b,c;
const int sum = 1000;
int result = -1;
for (a = 1; a<sum; a++){
	for (b = 1; b < sum; b++){
			c = sum-a-b;
			if (a*a+b*b == c*c){
				result = a*b*c;
				goto found;
			}
	}	
}
found:
std::cout << "a:" << a << std::endl;
std::cout << "b:" << b << std::endl;
std::cout << "c:" << c << std::endl;
std::cout <<"Result:" << result << std::endl;

Since "goto" statements are not very popular among c++ programmers, i would like to know, if this could be considered a reasonable use of "goto". Or if there is a better solution for the problem that doesn't need "goto". By that I don't mean a solution which just avoids "goto", but which avoids "goto" in a way that improves the algorithm.

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11  
i love those 8-space tabs you are using....very sexy. –  Andrew Garrison Jun 21 '09 at 17:34
8  
With a 16-space tab in the middle... –  Nikhil Chelliah Jun 21 '09 at 17:51
4  
I see this as reasonable. It is a forward jump. It does not make the code harder to read. Remember readability is the key (that is why goto is not liked; it can make the code hard to follow). But the same affect can be achieved by putting the loops inside a function (passing a,b,c as ref parameters) and using return instead of goto. –  Loki Astari Jun 21 '09 at 17:53
2  
Here's a tip I picked up somewhere: only jump forward, and you'll avoid unreadable spaghetti code. –  Nikhil Chelliah Jun 21 '09 at 17:53
5  
Well, you guys know what, I like my tabs as they are! ;-) –  Lucas Jun 21 '09 at 18:06

7 Answers 7

up vote 44 down vote accepted

return is a "structured" goto which many programmers find more acceptable! So:

static int findit(int sum, int* pa, int* pb, int* pc)
{
    for (int a = 1; a<sum; a++) {
        for (int b = 1; b < sum; b++) {
            int c = sum-a-b;
            if (a*a+b*b == c*c) {
                *pa = a; *pb = b; *pc = c;
                return a*b*c;
        }
    }
    return -1;    
}

int main() {
    int a, b, c;
    const int sum = 1000;
    int result = findit(sum, &a, &b, &c);
    if (result == -1) {
        std::cout << "No result!" << std::endl;
        return 1;
    }
    std::cout << "a:" << a << std::endl;
    std::cout << "b:" << b << std::endl;
    std::cout << "c:" << c << std::endl;
    std::cout <<"Result:" << result << std::endl;
    return 0;
}
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20  
+1: if it's complex enough to consider a goto, it's complex enough to encapsulate in a function and avoid the goto. –  John Pirie Jun 21 '09 at 17:55
2  
Yep. Don't complicate the loops.Just get out. Perfect solution. But you could pass a,b,c by reference. Then you don't need to mess around with pointers. –  Loki Astari Jun 21 '09 at 17:57
2  
@Martin, I prefer the piece of mind that comes from knowing that, whether I'm programming in C or C++, calling f(a) will never alter a -- that peace of mind would disappear if we let it happen "sometimes". And checking if (e.g.) pa is null is as supererogatory as checking that (e.g.) aa+bb isn't overflowing -- just part of the contract the caller must respect. Lastly, references can be erroneously null too (receive int&a, pass *p where int *p is 0, just print &a in the receiving function and you'll see the 0)...!-). –  Alex Martelli Jun 21 '09 at 23:18
4  
The only downside to this approach is that, in ducking a fight with the "NEVER USE GOTO!!!" crowd, you run straight into a fight with the "FUNCTIONS MUST ONLY HAVE ONE RETURN!!!" crowd. So taking this approach because you like it, feel that "findit" is a good abstraction, and are willing to defend it, is fine. Taking this approach solely in order to avoid a goto is futile. –  Steve Jessop Jun 22 '09 at 15:20
5  
@onebyone, sure, there's all sort of fundamentalists;-), but "single return"ites are pretty thin on the ground at any place I'd care to work for: differently from gotophobia (a benign ailment which has been observed in excellent programmers, due to being scarred by past encounters with spaghetti code), monoreturnitis is a malignant (though fortunately rare) syndrome requiring drastic therapy...;-) –  Alex Martelli Jun 22 '09 at 15:36

IMO using a goto is fine in these situations.

Btw, the condescending preaching against goto usually comes from people who just parrot what they heard others say or read somewhere..

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1  
Java has named loops, which are pretty much identical to this –  Casebash Nov 1 '09 at 3:29
1  
@Casebash: Sure. But how is this related to the answer or the question? –  phresnel Jul 22 '11 at 14:26

See this question about breaking out of 2 loops. There are much better answers provided than using a goto.

The best answer provided is to place your second loop into a function, and call that function from inside your first loop.

code copied from mquander's response

public bool CheckWhatever(int whateverIndex)
{
    for(int j = 0; j < height; j++)
    {
        if(whatever[whateverIndex][j]) return false;
    }

    return true;
}

public void DoubleLoop()
{
    for(int i = 0; i < width; i++)
    {
        if(!CheckWhatever(i)) break;
    }
}

Though I do feel that using a goto in this case isn't quite as bad as killing kittens. But it's close.

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9  
How have we all got brain washed? :) The resulting structure of this code is more "complex" than using goto (due to the additional 'if-statement' in DoubleLoop). Splitting the code out may also reduce the set of optimisations that a compiler can make - for example a variable that is local to "CheckWhatever" potentially could have been optimised to be outside the enclosing loop. –  Richard Corden Aug 11 '09 at 9:06

I can't think of a better alternative. But one alternative not using goto would be modifying the first for-loop:

for (a = 1; a<sum && result == -1; a++){

Then break out of the second for-loop. That will work assuming the result will never be -1 after the second for-loop has been broken by break.

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2  
I don't see this as better. You are making the code harder to read as you are adding more conditions to the test. –  Loki Astari Jun 21 '09 at 17:54
    
And you're right. As I said, I couldn't think of a better alternative, I just showed a way to avoid the goto loop without altering the code considerably. –  Blixt Jun 21 '09 at 18:22
    
I'd like to add that Alex Martelli's solution is of course better. Encapsulating it in a function is probably the best solution in this case. –  Blixt Jun 21 '09 at 18:24

You could declare a bool found = false at the top and then add && !found to your for loop conditionals (after a < sum and b < sum) and then set found to true where your current goto is. Then make your output conditional on found being true.

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I just found this on the "Related" sidebar. An interesting thread overall, but in particular, this is an answer to my question.

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int a,b,c,sum = 1000;
for (a = 1; a<sum; ++a)
 for (b = 1; b<sum; ++b){
  c = sum-a-b;
  if (a*a+b*b == c*c) sum = -a*b*c;
 }
printf("a: %d\n",a-1);
printf("b: %d\n",b-1);
printf("c: %d\n",c);
printf("Result: %d\n",-sum);

Also optimized result out.. :P

Anyway i love gotos!

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