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Which scenario should I use for changing private fields inside class methods/properties:

public class Example
{
 private int intVar = 0;
 private string stringVar = string.Empty;

 public int IntVar
 {
  get { return this.intvar; }
  set { this.intvar = value; }
 }

 public string StringVar 
 {
  get { return this.stringVar ; }
  set { this.stringVar = value; }
 }

 private void SomeMethod()
 {
  //change fields in this way:
  this.intVar = 50;
  this.stringVar = "changed";
  //or that way(through properties):
  this.IntVar = 50;
  this.StringVar = "changed";
 }
}

Maybe in this example it makes no difference, but what if someone add extra code to properties, and changing fields through properties will change some other things?

Can you say which way is better, or it really makes no difference?

I know that since C# 3.0 I can write auto-implemented properties, but this is C# 2.0.

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3  
Just a side comment - it's usually a bad idea to have the name of the field and the property differ by just capitalization. Common convention is to name the fields _intVar and _stringVar, and avoid the possibility of mistypes calling the wrong one, or worse, getting a StackOverflowException if you do return IntVar from within IntVar. –  Avner Shahar-Kashtan Apr 20 '12 at 9:55
    
+1 thanks for hint –  adams Apr 20 '12 at 9:59
    
But according to Microsoft, we also shouldn't use prefixes for field names. –  Botz3000 Apr 20 '12 at 10:03
    
@Botz3000 you're right. I'm treating Avner advice like good idea: to longer reflect on good property name than naming properties differ by one letter. –  adams Apr 20 '12 at 10:35
    
@Botz3000 - Note that that link goes to a Fx 1.1 page. MS has changed/weakened this guideline. –  Henk Holterman Apr 21 '12 at 19:32
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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'd say using a property is usually better. If the getters and setters are simple, they might get inlined by the jitter at runtime anyway. And as you said, maybe other changes will be made to the property code.

A common change is adding change notifications by implementing INotifyPropertyChanged. Listeners would not get notified if you set the fields directly, then.

I prefer my classes to use their own public interface rather than internals. An exception for me is when i explicitly do not want any of the side effects. That is rarely the case though.

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From my experience, always use properties and do not try to access directly at your var. If, in the future, someone add code to the property accessors, is its responsability to check the side effects of its changes.

In that scenario, you will facilitate the testing work. The change implementor needs to check only on the public names and not the internal vars.

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If you do some sort of validation, for example mark an Example object as invalid when the intVar exceeds the 100 value, then you should use the Properties.

public int IntVar
 {
  get { return this.intvar; }
  set 
      { 
         if ( value > 100)
            // handle this corner case
         else      
           this.intvar = value; 
      }
 }

Let's say your private method does some calculations

private void SomeMethod()
 {
   int result = ...;
   IntVar = result;
 }

When SomeMethod is called is better to use here the property, so the property would handle the validation, since the field can't do this.

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That's example of extra code I mentioned in my question. –  adams Apr 20 '12 at 10:38
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It doesn't make any difference and is a personal preferences.
I prefer to use the properties.

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2  
It will make a difference when you later add validation to the setter . –  Henk Holterman Apr 20 '12 at 9:55
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