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I run into this issue again and again: how can I group a list of objects by a containing list of other objects?

I have a list of objects of type A and each of these objects has an property (lets call it ListProp) which is a list also. ListProp has elements of the type B. There are multiple elements of type A with identically B-objects in ListProp, but the ListProp property reference differs from element to element. How can I group these A-objects the fastest way, where the B-objects in ListProp are identically?

Sample code:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var exampleList = new List<A>
        {
            // Should be in first group
            new A { ListProp = new List<B>
            {
                new B { Prop = new C { Number = 0 }},
                new B { Prop = new C { Number = 1 }}
            }},
            // Should be in first group
            new A { ListProp = new List<B>
            {
                new B { Prop = new C { Number = 0 }},
                new B { Prop = new C { Number = 1 }}
            }},
            // Should be in second group
            new A { ListProp = new List<B>
            {
                new B { Prop = new C { Number = 0 }},
                new B { Prop = new C { Number = 1 }},
                new B { Prop = new C { Number = 1 }}
            }},
            // Should be in third group
            new A { ListProp = new List<B>
            {
                new B { Prop = new C { Number = 0 }},
                new B { Prop = new C { Number = 0 }}
            }}
        };

        // Doesn't work because the reference of ListProp is always different
        var groupedExampleList = exampleList.GroupBy(x => x.ListProp);
    }
}

class C
{
    public int Number { get; set; }
    public override bool Equals(object o)
    {
        if (o is C)
            return Number.Equals(((C)o).Number);
        else
            return false;
    }
}

class B
{
    public C Prop { get; set; }
}

class A
{
    public IList<B> ListProp { get; set; }
}
share|improve this question
1  
Why the last should be in third group? It should be in first, shouldn't i? –  abatishchev Apr 20 '12 at 11:28
    
Because the number of elements should be the same as well. 0,1 != 0,1,1 –  germanSharper Apr 20 '12 at 11:45
    
Ok that was improper edit. Clear now. –  abatishchev Apr 20 '12 at 11:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can implement IEqualityComparer<List<B>> and use it in the other GroupBy overload.

public class ListOfBEqualityComparer : IEqualityComparer<List<B>>
{
    public bool Equals(List<B> x, List<B> y)
    {
        // you can also implement IEqualityComparer<B> and use the overload
        return x.SequenceEqual(y);
    }

    public int GetHashCode(List<B> obj)
    {
        //implementation of List<T> may not work for your situation
        return obj.GetHashCode();
    }
}

Then you can use the overload

var groupedExampleList = exampleList.GroupBy(x => x.ListProp, 
                                             new ListOfBEqualityComparer());
share|improve this answer
    
Perfect! Thanks a lot :) Why am I always forgetting these to things: SequenceEquals and using a custom comparer. You saved my day and especially my weekend ;) –  germanSharper Apr 20 '12 at 12:01
    
You're welcome :) –  Ufuk Hacıoğulları Apr 20 '12 at 12:57

Try this:

GroupBy(x => String.Join(",", x.ListProp));

It will group by 0,1; 0,1; 0,1; 0,1,1; 0,1 accordingly.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for your thought, but this only works for the example. My objects are much more complex, so it would be hard to do it in this way. But for a simple approach this is a good idea. –  germanSharper Apr 20 '12 at 11:50
    
@germanSharper: You know this sounds like a calculating a hash-code from an object (aim the same is your: equal by a criteria objects should return an equal value/hash-code). It could be a list or class. In our framework the common approach is to delimit the meaningful properties: "A:B:C:D:". –  abatishchev Apr 20 '12 at 12:18
    
@germanSharper: Also you can compare both of the solutions: delimit/join items inside custom comparer. Makes sense to me –  abatishchev Apr 20 '12 at 12:19

I would approach this the following way:

  1. Associate each child element (in ListProp property) with its parent
  2. Group the parents by children
  3. Project the results

var data = exampleList.SelectMany(a=>a.ListProp.Select(x=>new{Key = x.Prop.Number, Value = a}))
           .GroupBy(x=>x.Key)
           .Select(g=>new {Number = g.Key, Items = g.ToList()});
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