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Does anyone have any examples for creating a standard dialog/Login windows with OK and Cancel buttons bottom right.

I am unsure if to use StackPanels, Grids or dockpanels. I understand that its normally not correct to use the Canvas due the fact that you have to enter x and y values.

What i have created so far is the buttos for the Ok and Cancel

   <StackPanel Orientation="Horizontal" 
            FlowDirection="RightToLeft" Height="32">
        <Button Width="72" TabIndex="45" Margin="2,2,2,2">Cancel</Button>
        <Button Width="72" TabIndex="40" Margin="2,2,2,2">OK</Button>
    </StackPanel>

I would really appreciate any help in this area.

The kind of windows i want to create are the standard Dialog windows.

Thanks

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The answer depends on what is it you are not satisfied with in the markup you provided. By the way, there's no need to specify TabIndex explicitly as it defaults to grow in up-to-bottom and left-to-right manner in WPF. You can also use Grid with 2 columns with fractional star widths so that buttons would resize with the window/page containing the login dialog –  EvAlex Apr 20 '12 at 11:50
    
Well i have arranged my buttons in a stack panel but now i need to align the stack panel to the bottom of the screen. THis is where i get a little confused, so i should create a Grid with 2 rows.. last row like AUTO which contains the stackpanel with buttons and 1st row like "*" to expand the rest of the space.. Then inside the 1st row i can create another stackpanel to how my LAbel and Textbox for ie.. "Username _____" and "password ___________" –  Martin Apr 20 '12 at 11:58
    
exactly! It's totally ok –  EvAlex Apr 20 '12 at 12:00
    
Also I am afraid of overusing the container controls like grid, stackpanel, maybe the stackpanel i was using for the buttons isn't needed if i use a grid... I was trying to acheive the lightest markup possible - which is a always i good think i suppose? –  Martin Apr 20 '12 at 12:01
    
please see my answer –  EvAlex Apr 20 '12 at 12:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I would prefer the following markup:

 <Grid>
    <Grid.RowDefinitions>
        <RowDefinition />
        <RowDefinition Height="Auto" />
    </Grid.RowDefinitions>
    <Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
        <ColumnDefinition Width="2*"/>
        <ColumnDefinition Width="3*"/>
    </Grid.ColumnDefinitions>     

    <Grid Grid.ColumnSpan="2">
        <Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
            <ColumnDefinition Width="Auto"/>
            <ColumnDefinition />
        </Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
        <Grid.RowDefinitions>
            <RowDefinition Height="Auto" />
            <RowDefinition Height="Auto" />
        </Grid.RowDefinitions> 

        <TextBlock VerticalAlignment="Center">Username:</TextBlock>
        <TextBlock VerticalAlignment="Center" Grid.Row="1">Password:</TextBlock>
        <TextBox Grid.Column="1"  />
        <TextBox Grid.Row=1"" Grid.Column="1"  />
    </Grid>

    <Button Grid.Row="1">Ok</Button>
    <Button Grid.Row="1" Grid.Column="1">Cancel</Button>
</Grid>

Yes, it is also possible to reduce number of Grids to 1, but I see no point in it. Also one can use StackPanel instead of outer Grid.

"The lightest markup" phrase can be interpreted differently. The lightest for developer is the most simple and clear. The lightest for computer is the fastest to initialize and render. As for the given case, the difference is really in 1 extra layout container. This really is not the case to make optimisations

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 <Grid>
    <Grid.RowDefinitions>
        <RowDefinition Height="*"></RowDefinition>
        <RowDefinition Height="Auto"></RowDefinition>
        <RowDefinition Height="Auto"></RowDefinition>
        <RowDefinition Height="Auto"></RowDefinition>
    </Grid.RowDefinitions>
    <Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
        <ColumnDefinition Width="*"></ColumnDefinition>
        <ColumnDefinition Width="*"></ColumnDefinition>
    </Grid.ColumnDefinitions>     
    <TextBlock grid.row=1 grid.column=0 text="user name" />
    <TextBlock grid.row=1 grid.column=1 text="password" />
    <TextBox grid.row=2 grid.column=0  />
    <TextBox grid.row=2 grid.column=1  />
    <Button grid.row=3 grid.column=0 text="OK" />
    <Button grid.row=3 grid.column=1 text="Cancel" />
  </Grid>
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For my applications I like to use ChildWindow. Then on every page I can validate if the user is authetified and pop the child window if that is not the case. This is also nice use bookmarks if you are using the navigation type of project within silverlight.

 <toolkit:BusyIndicator IsBusy="False" Name="LoginBusy" >
        <Grid x:Name="LayoutRoot" Margin="2">
            <Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
                <ColumnDefinition Width="189*" />
                <ColumnDefinition Width="189*" />
            </Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
            <Grid.RowDefinitions>
                <RowDefinition Height="65*" />
                <RowDefinition Height="32" />
                <RowDefinition Height="32" />
                <RowDefinition Height="26*" />
                <RowDefinition Height="35" />
            </Grid.RowDefinitions>
            <Button x:Name="OKButton" Content="OK" Click="OKButton_Click" Width="75" Height="23" HorizontalAlignment="Right" Margin="0,12,0,0" Grid.Row="4" Grid.Column="1" TabIndex="3" />
            <sdk:Label Grid.Row="1" Name="label1" HorizontalAlignment="Right" Content="Username" Margin="4"  />
            <sdk:Label Grid.Row="2" Name="label2" HorizontalAlignment="Right" Content="Password" Margin="4" />
            <TextBox Grid.Column="1" Grid.Row="1" Name="Username" Margin="4" Text="{Binding Username,Mode=TwoWay}" TextChanged="TextInserted" TabIndex="1" />
            <PasswordBox Grid.Column="1" Grid.Row="2" Name="Password" Margin="4" Password="{Binding Password,Mode=TwoWay}" PasswordChanged="TextInserted" TabIndex="2" />
            <TextBlock Grid.Column="1" Grid.Row="3" Height="37" HorizontalAlignment="Left" Visibility="Collapsed" Margin="19,13,0,0" Name="ErrorBlock" Text="Authentication Failed." VerticalAlignment="Top" Width="161" Foreground="Red" FontWeight="Bold" />
            <Button Grid.Row="4" Height="23" HorizontalAlignment="Left" Margin="46,4,0,0" Visibility="Collapsed" Name="button1" Content="CANCEL" VerticalAlignment="Top" Width="75" Click="CancelButton_Click" IsTabStop="False" />
            <Image Name="image1" Stretch="Fill" Source="Images/logo.png" />
        </Grid>
    </toolkit:BusyIndicator>

This is the content of my child window without the header bits. Notice that I bind directly to a user object which implements the InotifyPropertyChanged. Also while the web service performs the validation I enable the busy indicator so the user sees his request is being processes.

Cheers,

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