Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following function (returns a set of custom types)

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION myfunction(in_myvar integer)
  RETURNS SETOF my_type AS
$BODY$

DECLARE
    v_data my_type%rowtype;
    v_another_var text;
BEGIN
    FOR v_data IN (

        -- I want to be able to do a SELECT INTO v_another_var in each iteration
        -- of the loop, ideally so I can use this value throughout the select
        -- statement e.g.:
        -- SELECT INTO v_another_var regex_replace(col3, '[^a-zA-Z0-9 ]', '');

        SELECT DISTINCT 
            col1
            col2,
            -- v_another_var AS some_column
            -- etc.
            -- perhaps use this v_another_var again here
            -- as part of something else.
          FROM mytable
          WHERE v_another_var = 'test' + some_function() = 'something'
                    -- want to use the variable again here.
    ) LOOP
        RETURN NEXT v_data;
    END LOOP;
    RETURN;
$BODY$

Is it possible to assign a variable and use it in each select statement as part of a loop in this way? Even if this is possible, would the SELECT INTO statement work where I have it (would col3 be accessible?)

Is there a way in postgres to achieve this kind of variable usage?

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to SELECT the value for v_another_var in the query controlling you loop, or inside the LOOP/END LOOP construct, if you want a different value in each iteration of the loop. You can always have additional queries to assign other values inside the loop if needed.

It's hard to make a more concrete suggestion without a more concrete example.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your question is a mess. Much of it does not make any sense at all.

Is it possible to assign a variable and use it in each select statement as part of a loop in this way?

  • You only have one SELECT statement in your question. You are not making sense.

  • There is no loop "in" a SELECT statement. You can loop through the rows resulting from a SELECT statement.

Even if this is possible, would the INSERT INTO statement work where I have it (would col3 be accessible?)

  • It would not at all. Neither where you have it nor what you have there.
    • Maybe you meant SELECT INTO?
    • There is no FROM clause, col3 is undefined.
    • Only one statement in the FOR loop. More about that further down.

Furthermore ...

  • No parenthesis required for the SELECT of a FOR loop.

  • regexp_replace(), not regex_replace().

  • Text concatenation in PostgreSQL: 'test' || some_function()
    not 'test' + some_function()

  • You need parentheses around WHERE x = (a || b)

  • Language declaration is missing. Add language plpgsql at the end.


What you may be asking (wild guess): Yes, you can assign multiple variables in a FOR loop. I quote the manual here:

The target is a record variable, row variable, or comma-separated list of scalar variables.

You cannot mix a record variable and a scalar variable, though, as you seem to be trying. You would have to ...

a) split up the composite type v_data into scalar variables and list them in order, then append v_another_var to the FOR target list.

or b) add a text column (instead of v_another_var) to the composite type my_type. However, you would have to reorganize the RETURN NEXT statement in this case. Since I am just guessing what your question might be, I will not go into more details.

Clean up your question and ask a precise question if you want a precise answer.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow sorry. I've not deliberately tried to make this question complicated/messy - I guess I don't really understand how this works all that well. –  harman_kardon Apr 20 '12 at 21:30
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.