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I have a class with a function

MyClass::doStuff(std::vector<MyCustomData*> toSort) { ...

in which I call

std::sort(toSort.begin(), toSort.end(), MyClass::SortByZ());

myClass::SortByZ() is a custom comparator. Now this works but I would like to achieve the following:

I have several classes, which should each have its own comparator functor to sort "MyCustomData". So e.g. Class1... should have

class Class1 {
    struct SortData {
        bool operator ()(MyCustomData *lhs, MyCustomData *rhs) {
        return lhs->something1 > rhs->something1;
        }
    };
    //...many more functions/vars
}

while Class2 has a different comparator functor for the same datatype eg

class Class2 {
    struct SortData {
        bool operator ()(MyCustomData *lhs, MyCustomData *rhs) {
        return lhs->something2 > rhs->something2;
        }
    };
    //...many more functions/vars
}

Now I would like to be able to call the function MyClass::doStuff(...) with either

doStuff(myData, Class1::SortData)

or

doStuff(myData, Class2::SortData)

and the function MyClass::doStuff(...) should use the respective Sort-Order.

I did not find out a way of doing this, is there one? I would like a simple solution (doesn't have to support templates or anything). I would be willing to use boost if I needed that, but a solution without boost would be preferred.

I hope I was able to describe what I want to achieve? Thanks for any help!

share|improve this question
1  
If your vector stores MyCustomData objects and not pointers, your SortData functors should have a different signature: bool operator()(MyCustomData const & lhs, MyCustomData const & rhs). – Luc Touraille Apr 20 '12 at 12:05
    
Sorry, I was unclear about that. The vector stores pointers, so vector<MyCustomData*>, so the functor signature works. – Ela782 Apr 20 '12 at 13:05
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You will have to make doStuff a template:

template <typename Comparator>
void doStuff(std::vector<MyCustomData*> toSort, Comparator compare) {
   // ...
   std::sort(toSort.begin(), toSort.end(), compare);
   // ...
}

Also, it might want to take the first argument by reference. As it is, it will sort a copy of the argument, discard that copy, and leave the caller's vector untouched; although perhaps that's what you want.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer, and also to Luc! I just found two more ideas which might work and help me. Would it be possible to call the comparison function/functor with an argument (string)? Then I'd call doStuff(myData, "SortByThis"), and the comparator could do bool operator (...string sortByThis?...)(MyCustomData const & lhs, MyCustomData const & rhs) { ...return lhs.something.find[sortByThis]->second > rhs.something.find[sortByThis]->second; Because I'm sorting according to some entries in that std::map something. – Ela782 Apr 20 '12 at 13:21
    
The second idea would be to give the struct a variable string SortByThis and use that in operator(), or make the struct a class, instantiate it, set SortByThis to my desired string and use that? I guess I'm going to try all three. Is there some better than the other from a software-engineering point of view? – Ela782 Apr 20 '12 at 13:21
    
@Ela782: The second way is how you'd do that. You can't change the comparator's function-call operator; that has to be something like bool operator()(T a, T b); with no extra arguments. But you can put data members in the comparator, and use them in the operator. – Mike Seymour Apr 20 '12 at 13:25
    
Ok, so I ended up doing class SortData { public: SortData (std::string sortType) { this->sortType= sortType; }; bool operator ()(MyCustomData *lhs, MyCustomData *rhs) { return lhs->something.find(sortType)->second > rhs->something.find(sortType)->second; }; private: std::string sortType; }; and calling it with std::sort(toSort.begin(), toSort.end(), MyCustomData::SortData("mySortOrder")); I guess that is the better solution than using templates? But your template advise was equally useful, thank you very much! – Ela782 Apr 20 '12 at 14:04

Use a function template, in order to accept any kind of comparison function (or functor):

template <typename Comparator>
void doStuff(std::vector<MyCustomData> toSort, Comparator comparator)
{
    ...
    std::sort(toSort.begin(), toSort.end(), comparator);
    ...
}
...
doStuff(myData, Class1::SortData());
doStuff(myData, Class2::SortData());

This is how standard algorithms provide genericity.

share|improve this answer
    
It's a shame I can only accept one answer, as yours is the same and equally useful. And you were probably only slower because you first entered the comment about my wrong functor signature. So I dont know who I should select, I'm very new here. I thank you very much for your help! – Ela782 Apr 20 '12 at 13:58
    
@Ela782: Don't worry, I'm won't miss the 15 reputation points :). Usually, when a question has several identical answers, it is common to accept the one that came first. In this case, @Mike's answer is even slightly better since he calls attention to the fact that toSort is passed by value. I considered deleting my answer, but I'll leave it up as it provides a sample use of the function template. – Luc Touraille Apr 20 '12 at 15:58

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