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I've worked through the Tutorial on using the UiBinder and tried to utilize the LazyPanel as mentioned in the last section of the tutorial.

To me it seems as if the tutorial implied that simply wrapping up an Element in a LazyPanel would suffice to make that thing work. However, when I try to compile and run this project the GWT compiler complains and tells me that

Rebind result 'com.google.gwt.user.client.ui.LazyPanel' cannot be abstract

How do I have to use the LazyPanel using the UiBinder? Is there something wrong with my configuration or what am I missing on?

I'm using GWT 2.4 (which is AFAIK the latest stable release).

--

EDIT: Here's the XML I'm using:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<ui:UiBinder xmlns:ui="urn:ui:com.google.gwt.uibinder"
    xmlns:g="urn:import:com.google.gwt.user.client.ui" xmlns:s="urn:import:de.dfv.yankee.client.tabs.start"
    xmlns:b="urn:import:de.dfv.yankee.client.tabs.bewerber" xmlns:f="urn:import:de.dfv.yankee.client.tabs.firmen"
    xmlns:k="urn:import:de.dfv.yankee.client.tabs.kommunikation" xmlns:a="urn:import:de.dfv.yankee.client.tabs.admin"
    xmlns:v="urn:import:de.dfv.yankee.client.tabs.abrechnung" xmlns:u="urn:import:de.dfv.yankee.client.tabs.user"
    xmlns:svg="urn:import:org.vectomatic.dom.svg.ui">

    <ui:with field="svgBundle" type="de.dfv.yankee.client.tabs.Tabs.SVGBundle" />

    <g:TabLayoutPanel barUnit="PX" barHeight="30"
        ui:field="tabs">

        <g:tab>
            <g:header>Start</g:header>
            <s:StartTab ui:field="startTab" />
        </g:tab>

        <g:tab>
            <g:header>Bewerber</g:header>
            <b:BewerberSucheTab ui:field="bewerberSucheTab" />
        </g:tab>

        <g:tab>
            <g:header>Bewerber Ergebnis</g:header>
            <g:HTMLPanel>
                <svg:SVGImage ui:field="svgImage" resource="{svgBundle.plz}" />
            </g:HTMLPanel>
        </g:tab>

        <g:tab>
            <g:header>Firmen</g:header>
            <g:LazyPanel>
                <f:FirmenSucheTab ui:field="firmenSucheTab" />
            </g:LazyPanel>
        </g:tab>

        <g:tab>
            <g:header>Firma Ergebnis</g:header>
            <g:HTMLPanel>

            </g:HTMLPanel>
        </g:tab>

        <g:tab>
            <g:header>Kommunikation</g:header>
            <k:KommunikationsTab ui:field="kommunikationsTab" />
        </g:tab>

        <g:tab>
            <g:header>Abrechnung</g:header>
            <v:VermittlungenTab ui:field="vermittlungenTab" />
        </g:tab>

        <g:tab>
            <g:header>Userverwaltung</g:header>
            <u:UserTab ui:field="userTab" />
        </g:tab>

        <g:tab>
            <g:header>Admin</g:header>
            <a:AdminTab ui:field="adminTab" />
        </g:tab>

    </g:TabLayoutPanel>

</ui:UiBinder>
share|improve this question
    
Can you show your XML? It should work. (and yes, 2.4 is the latest stable) –  Thomas Broyer Apr 20 '12 at 13:28
    
I've edited in the XML I'm using. –  scravy Apr 20 '12 at 13:51

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

EDIT BEGIN

Here's the right Solution:

<g:TabLayoutPanel barHeight="2" barUnit="EM" width="250px" height="150px">
  <g:tab>
    <g:header>T1</g:header>
    <t:MyLazyPanel1 />
  </g:tab>
  <g:tab>
    <g:header>T2</g:header>
    <t:MyLazyPanel2 />
  </g:tab>
</g:TabLayoutPanel>

MyLazyPanel1:

public class MyLazyPanel1 extends LazyPanel {
  Label l = new Label("label1");
  @Override
  protected Widget createWidget() {
    System.out.println("now1");
    return l;
  }
}

MyLazyPanel2:

public class MyLazyPanel2 extends LazyPanel {
  Label l = new Label("label2");
  @Override
  protected Widget createWidget() {
    System.out.println("now2");
    return l;
  }
}

Now you can see 'now1' showing up in your console when the application starts, and 'now2' shows up when you click on the second tab.

EDIT END

This works:

<g:TabLayoutPanel barHeight="2" barUnit="EM" width="250px" height="150px">
  <g:tab>
    <g:header>T1</g:header>
    <t:MyLazyPanel>
      <g:Label>ABC</g:Label>
    </t:MyLazyPanel>
  </g:tab>
  <g:tab>
    <g:header>T2</g:header>
    <t:MyLazyPanel>
      <g:Label>123</g:Label>
    </t:MyLazyPanel>
  </g:tab>
</g:TabLayoutPanel>

Where MyLazyPanel is:

public class MyLazyPanel extends LazyPanel {
  @Override
  protected Widget createWidget() {
    return null;
  }
}

But I don't know if it's loading truly lazy

... at least it compiles and the result looks as expexted

And have a look here: http://google-web-toolkit.googlecode.com/svn/javadoc/2.4/com/google/gwt/user/client/ui/LazyPanel.html

share|improve this answer
    
No this doesn't lazy load. The Lazy loading works by calling the createWidget() on attach and creating your content should be done in createWidget(), otherwise it works just like any other widget. –  Hilbrand Bouwkamp Apr 21 '12 at 10:18
    
At the top my post there is EDIT BEGIN (and in the middle EDIT END) and this is lazy loading, I've tested it. –  Benjamin M Apr 21 '12 at 15:29
    
Doesn't look as lazy loading to me. The idea of lazy loading is to postpone creation of the content till it's actually needed. In your example your content will be created as soon as the class is created, while to make it really lazy loading it should be created in the createWidget method. –  Hilbrand Bouwkamp Apr 22 '12 at 9:40
    
For the widget it's true. But the "System.out" is lazily evaluated. –  Benjamin M Apr 26 '12 at 7:43

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