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what's the correct way to free the memory here? The pointer-array contains duplicates!

class HashTable
{
   Bucket<E>** index = new Bucket<E>*[indexSize];
   ...
}

~ExtHash( ) 
{
  for (size_t i = 0; i < indexSize; ++i) 
     delete index[i];

   delete[] index;
 }
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By duplicates you mean pointers to the same elements? –  jrok Apr 20 '12 at 12:04
    
yes, like this index[0] --> 0x123, index[1] --> 0x456, index[2] --> 0x123 –  user1308532 Apr 20 '12 at 12:08
    
Isn't C++ robust to this automatically? –  TMS Apr 20 '12 at 12:09
    
@Tomas: No; if you destroy an object, then any pointer or reference to that object becomes a live hand grenade. Deleting an object twice (as this code would do) gives undefined behaviour. –  Mike Seymour Apr 20 '12 at 12:13
    
Thanks @Mike. Well, it can't be 100% robust, but just by storing some sequence of bytes that is unlikely to happen... I think C++ could be able to be 99.99% robust :-) –  TMS Apr 20 '12 at 12:20

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use a set to remove duplicates:

std::set<Bucket*> uniqueBuckets(index, index + indexSize);

for(Bucket* bucket: uniqueBuckets)
    delete bucket;
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In your situation it's dangerous to store raw pointers in such way. Better use std::shared_ptr and just reset shared pointers. And after all pointers will be reseted they will be safely freed.

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Perhaps like this:

~ExtHash( ) 
{
  std::sort(index, index + indexSize);
  size_t new_end = std::unique(index, index + indexSize) - index;

  for (size_t i = 0; i < new_end; ++i) 
     delete index[i];

   delete[] index;
 }
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Sort index, remove adjacent duplicates with std::unique. O(N log N) and that's as good as it gets.

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Yes, that's more efficient and less error prone than the dodgy code in my answer. –  Mike Seymour Apr 20 '12 at 12:18

I would think hard about whether you want this container to be responsible for deleting the objects; it would be simpler to store them elsewhere, and just use this container to refer to them, not to manage their lifetimes.

Alternatively, you could use std::shared_ptr to manage the objects; then they will be deleted automatically when you've discarded all of them.

If you really want to do it this way, you'll need to remove the duplicates after deleting each one; something like

for (size_t i = 0; i < indexSize; ++i) {
    Bucket<E> * victim = index[i];
    indexSize = std::remove(index+i+1, index+indexSize, victim) - index;
    delete victim;
}

[NOTE: this code may well be wrong; I certainly made a couple of mistakes writing it. If you really want to manage dynamic objects the hard way, then you'll need to test it thoroughly]

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Each time you create a pointer, push_back it into a vector. That vector will hold all your created pointers, and will hold each one of them only once.

Later, iterate that vector and delete the pointers. It's like writing your own simple garbage collector.

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Alternatively, keep the objects themselves in a list (not a vector, since you want pointers to them to remain valid as more are added). Then you won't need new and delete at all; the list will automatically destroy them for you. –  Mike Seymour Apr 20 '12 at 12:35

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