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I have many columns in a table which needs to be checked against some value and values needs to be replaced if match found..

So basically I am looking for a query which takes column name as sort of variable and loops through the table and updates the column value if matched..

I could do that with php, having as many quries as columns..But thats wat i dont want..

p.s. I know its a bad design, and in normal case such requirements never occur, but sadly it is what it is..

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4  
Why won't a regular UPDATE WHERE command work? I'm confused. –  Luke Berry Apr 20 '12 at 12:07
    
Give an example of string value, a value to compare to and a replace value. –  Shedal Apr 20 '12 at 12:07
4  
what about a meta query for the table structure and inner queries for the columns / values to look for? –  Hajo Apr 20 '12 at 12:08
    
UPDATE tablename SET colname = 'newvalue' WHERE colname = 'oldvalue' –  DaveRandom Apr 20 '12 at 12:08
    
And you want to do that with MySQL only? Otherwise you can get the whole result and loop through an array, or convert to string and use regex to do the matching. After that you could do the update, based on the regex result. –  Robert Apr 20 '12 at 12:09

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In many statements:

UPDATE tableX 
SET   col_1 = 'newvalue' 
WHERE col_1 = 'ram';

UPDATE tableX 
SET   col_2 = 'newvalue' 
WHERE col_2 = 'ram';

...

UPDATE tableX 
SET   col_N = 'newvalue' 
WHERE col_N = 'ram';

In one statement

UPDATE tableX 
SET   col_1 = CASE WHEN col_1 = 'ram'
                     THEN 'newvalue' 
                     ELSE col_1 
              END
    , col_2 = CASE WHEN col_2 = 'ram'
                     THEN 'newvalue' 
                     ELSE col_2 
              END
    ...

    , col_N = CASE WHEN col_N = 'ram'
                     THEN 'newvalue' 
                     ELSE col_N 
              END
 ;

You can write the statements by hand or with dynamic SQL (if the columns and tables to work are too many).

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How could this be done for a database where you do not know the column names? –  Ben Lobaugh May 7 '13 at 21:58
    
@BenLobaugh that depends on the DBMS (MySQL, SQL-Server, Oracle, Postgres) –  ypercube May 8 '13 at 5:23
UPDATE tablename SET columnname = 'newvalue' WHERE columnname = 'currentvalue';

UPDATE

This PHP script will go through each column name and apply the query to it

<?php
$result = mysql_query("SHOW COLUMNS FROM tablename ");
while ($row = mysql_fetch_assoc($result)) {
    mysql_query("UPDATE tablename SET ".$row['field']." = 'newvalue' WHERE ".$row['field']." = 'currentvalue'");
}
?>
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Thats wat I did want..dats column specific..I want top run it for all columns of my table.. –  Rajat Singhal Apr 20 '12 at 12:10
2  
Just add each column you want this to apply to to the query. It will be much faster then using PHP. –  John Conde Apr 20 '12 at 12:11
    
dats not it...if cloumn 'a' has value 'b' then change 'a'..same way for all columns.. –  Rajat Singhal Apr 20 '12 at 12:13

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.5/en/show-table-status.html

you can use that SHOW TABLE STATUS ... command to get the table structure in php and then build one update command out of the result that updates every column with the matching data to change.

its possible to just get the tables you want by using SHOW TABLE STATUS LIKE ... or SHOW TABLE STATUS WHERE name = ...

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Make it in php, I would create arrays of column, value pairs in form column=value, one for old values and one for new ones, and then explode this arrays so query would look like

"UPDATE table SET ".explode(',', $newvalues)." WHERE ".explode(' AND ', $oldarray)
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This is another wrong question, to which a literal answer will do no good.

If you need such a loop, your database setup is surely wrong.

a column have to contain distinct value, not shared among other other columns.

If you are trying to implement some sort of one-to-many relationship, you have to move these twin columns into a column in a separate table.

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1  
I agree that a sensible design would not encourage the need for such a query, but I often run into some horribly designed databases. The last one resulted in me needing to query information_schema in a sub query just to find tables matching a pattern to actually query. I couldn't change it, so I just had to work with it. –  Tim Post Apr 22 '12 at 15:05

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