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I'm writing a little js library: I've defined an Item object, then added a function with Item.prototype.addNumber and finally I set it as not enumerable, but if I try to log Item's method using for...in loop the function still appears. This is my code, Am I doing something wrong? (tested on Chrome 18 and Firefox 11)

function Item() {
    ...
}

Item.prototype.addString= function() {
    ...
}

Object.defineProperty(Item, "addString", { enumerable: false });
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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You're defining the property on Item instead of on Item.prototype.

Object.defineProperty(Item.prototype, "addString", { enumerable: false });

If you used Object.defineProperty to initially add addString to Item.prototype, then you could explicitly (or implicitly) set the property descriptors at the same time...

This will implicitly set enumerable:false, as well as false for configurable and writable.

Object.defineProperty(Item.prototype, "addString", { 
    value: function() {
        ...
    }
});

Or if you wanted only enumerable to be false, you could do this...

Object.defineProperty(Item.prototype, "addString", { 
    value: function() {
        ...
    },
    configurable: true,
    writable: true
//  ,enumerable: false  // uncomment to be explicit, though not necessary
});
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but isn't it false by default? look on the quote in my answer. And I didn't see in the MDN article *.prototype at all. –  gdoron Apr 20 '12 at 13:39
    
@gdoron: Doing Item.prototype.addString = func... is enumerable by default, so Object.defineProperty is used to set the enumerable setting. If the Item.prototype.addString property had been initially created using defineProperty, then yes, it would have been non-enumerable. –  squint Apr 20 '12 at 13:41
    
ohhh, so can you use this instead: Object.defineProperty(Item.prototype, "addString", { }); ? –  gdoron Apr 20 '12 at 13:43
    
@gdoron: Sort of. If you were using it to initially define the value of the property, you'd need to use the value: func... of the third argument. I'll give an update. –  squint Apr 20 '12 at 13:45
    
@gdoron: Yeah, when I use SO as a resource, I give as much attention to votes as I do to green checks. I think the asker is more influenced by the votes than anyone, so lots of votes can lead to a green check. You're right... it's not perfect. –  squint Apr 20 '12 at 15:18

You are defining a property (addString) directly on Object (the non enumerable one) and another addString (enumerable by default) on the Item's prototype.

A for ( in ) iterates over properties up the prototype chain, that's why it appears there.

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