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I have some existing WCF code that accesses SQL Server 2005, but honestly I've come to mistrust that developer's methods, so I want to know how this should be done correctly and professionally. I need to be able to pass an SQL statement to a method (within the WCF service, not from the client) that returns the resultant dataset (to the method in WCF that called it, not the client). I'm not interested in entity frameworks or other abstraction layers. I need to run SQL, DML, and hopefully DDL too.

I also want to know how to manage the connections.

Please point out your thoughts on better alternatives if you feel like it. I'm prepared to listen.

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5  
"I also want to know how to re-use the same connection [...]" --> Sounds like a bad idea to me. Stateless services are easier to maintain and less bug-prone. Note that creating a DB connection is a light operation thanks to connection pool. –  ken2k Apr 20 '12 at 13:40
    
As @ken2k said, don't worry about open/close connections. You don't get any performace hit by opening and closing. There is the connection pool to handle the 'problem' –  Steve Apr 20 '12 at 13:43
    
Thank all, I've edited my question. –  Sam Apr 20 '12 at 13:47
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted
  • Save your connection string in the configuration file.
  • Connect to the Database as much as you like, Connection Pool will take care of that you do not have to worry about it.
  • Always use using when dealing with sql connections.

    Using (sqlConn = new SqlConnection(ConnString)) { }

  • Make your own POCOs to return the result to the client, you can either make them in seperate assembly and share it in both projects (WCF and client) or you can just add them to the WCF and when you create the proxy at the client side you will have access to them.

Here is a sample layout:

public Poco Foo(long id)
{
    try
    {
        using (SqlConnection SqlConn = new SqlConnection(ConnString))
        {
            // execute your commands and do your stuff
            return Poco;
        }
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        Logger.Log(ex.ToString());
        return null;
    }
}

UPDATE

Here is an example of how to return a 'DataSet` to the client, I do not recommend this but it will work:

public DataSet Foo(long id)
    {
        try
        {
            using (SqlConnection SqlConn = new SqlConnection(ConnString))
            {
                SqlCommand sqlCmd = new SqlCommand("Select * From users where userid=@id", SqlConn);
                sqlCmd.Parameters.Add("@id", SqlDbType.BigInt).Value = id;
                DataSet ds = new DataSet();
                using (SqlDataAdapter da = new SqlDataAdapter(sqlCmd))
                {
                    da.Fill(ds, "Users");
                }

                return ds;
            }
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            Logger.Log(ex.ToString);
            return null;
        }
    }
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+1 "POCOs"? please decrypt... and thanks for the sample. –  Sam Apr 20 '12 at 13:59
    
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plain_Old_CLR_Object –  user915331 Apr 20 '12 at 14:01
    
Its the objects to hold your data, like Employee class for example, or Order class.. something like that. in other words the Entity.. –  user915331 Apr 20 '12 at 14:03
    
The customer class in @ken2k 's answer is a good example of how to share data between WCF and clients... –  user915331 Apr 20 '12 at 14:08
    
Thanks HaLaBi, but what about managing a general dataset for which I don't want to create an Entity. Isn't there a way of using something like a ClientDataSet (Delphi terminology for resultant dataset - records and fields). –  Sam Apr 20 '12 at 14:16
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Honestly, you shouldn't access SQL Server from a WCF service.

You should access data from a WCF Service, without knowing there is SQL Server under the hood.

Exposing a webservice that accepts a SQL statement looks definitely like a terrible idea to me. You don't want to expose your database to the client of your service for a lot of reasons (security...etc.).

What you could (should) do is to write a service that returns the data you actually want to return. For instance:

[DataContract]
public class Customer
{
    [DataMember]
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

[ServiceContract]
public interface IService
{
    Customer GetCustomer(int customerId);
}

[ServiceBehavior]
public class Service
{
    [OperationContract]
    public Customer GetCustomer(int customerId)
    {
        // Insert DB-related implementation of your query:
        // - you could hard-code a SQL query
        // - you could use Entity-Framework or other ORM
        //
        // First, create your connection to your database
        // Then query
        // Then close your connection
        //
        // Example with SQL connection
        // Connection string comes from server configuration (app.config or whatever)
        using (SqlConnection cn = new SqlConnection(connectionString))
        {
            Customer res = new Customer();

            // query here

            Customer.Name = XXX;    // From DB result
        }
    }
}

On client side:

ServiceClient proxy = new ServiceClient();
Customer myCustomer = proxy.GetCustomer(42);

You really shouldn't think about reusing SQL connections. The connection pool of your database will handle this for you. Creating/closing a connection to the DB is a light operation. Creating a new connection for each webservice call will avoid LOTS of trouble (connection lifetime...etc.).

Use stateless services as much as possible, it'll save you a lot of time (concurrency issues, object lifetime management...).

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2  
+1 for your "honesty"... but I clarified in my edited question text that the sql is not being passed in from the client. I'm talking about an SQL statement from one method to another within the WCF service. The client will be limited to the exposed contracts. –  Sam Apr 20 '12 at 14:05
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