Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Consider the following;

USE [$(db_name)]
GO

IF SCHEMA_ID('$(schema_name)') IS NULL
    -- Must use dynamic SQL because 'CREATE SCHEMA' must be the first
    -- statement in a query batch.
    EXECUTE('CREATE SCHEMA [$(schema_name)]')

-- User already exists at this point.
GRANT SELECT, EXECUTE ON SCHEMA::[$(schema_name)] TO [$(user_name)]

When executed through sqlcmd.exe, no errors are reported and the schema is created, but the permission are not granted. If I then execute the last line in SSMS (substituting the sqlcmd variable), it works as expected.

Is there a reason why SQL Server won't do what I ask?

Edit: should have said, it's SQL Server 2008 (10.50.1617).

Edit 2: Oh lord, turn out the deploy framework was dropping and recreating the user. Thanks for all your suggestions.

share|improve this question
    
Have you tried running the GRANT statement as dynamic sql? Just an idea... –  Bridge Apr 20 '12 at 13:40
    
I tried running it in the same EXECUTE but the server didn't like it. I haven't tried running it as a separate EXECUTE - I'll give that a go. –  Rory Hunter Apr 20 '12 at 13:44
    
Immediate suspect is scoping, anything inside Execute runs in it's own scope, I'd put the grant in there as well. Must confess no idea whether it will or won't work or why. –  Tony Hopkinson Apr 20 '12 at 13:46
    
It does get very peculiar about what you're allowed to pass in parameters; dynamic sql usually gets around it if you have to. –  Bridge Apr 20 '12 at 13:46
1  
@RoryHunter Please could you post your answer as an answer (and accept it) rather than an edit to your original question? It would make any potential searchers who find this question more likely to see it (as otherwise it'll come up in searches as having 0 answers). –  Bridge Apr 20 '12 at 15:20
show 2 more comments

1 Answer 1

Turns out the database user in question was being dropped and then recreated later on in the deploy process. That explains why there were no errors from sqlcmd.exe, and why the existence check I added before the GRANT didn't complain, and why running the GRANT manually afterwards worked as expected.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.