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I'm having a problem because there's an old third party database I'm trying to connect to and retrieve data from that uses the now deprecated text field. However I can't change the database fields so it's causing me problems when I try to return data through LINQ. Example code below:

var query = from s in db.tSearches
            join c in db.tCompanies on s.CompanyGUID equals c.GUID
            join cl in db.tCompanyLocations on s.LocationGUID equals cl.GUID
            join st in db.tSearchTypes on s.SearchTypeGUID equals st.GUID
            where s.DateClosed == null                        
            select new
            {
                Id = s.GUID,
                Type = st.GUID,
                Location = cl.LocationName,
                Company = (s.Confidential) ? String.Empty : c.CompanyName,
                DateOpened = s.DateOpened,
                Notes = s.PlacementNotes,
                Closed = s.DateClosed != null
            };

Some more filtering is done on this info before I ultimately try to do this:

        return query.Select(x => new VacancySummary
        {
            Id = x.Id,
            Departments = "",
            Location = x.Location,
            Company = x.Company,
            DateOpened = x.DateOpened,
            Notes = x.Notes,
            Closed = x.Closed
        }).Distinct().Skip(skip).Take(take);

And get the exception above. I'd rather not have to execute the whole SQL statement first and return the results before then running the Distinct as there's a performance hit with the server bandwidth if each user retrieved all the records for each of the searches which is why only a section of data is returned.

Any ideas?

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If it's deprecated why don't you just not pull that field? –  JNK Apr 20 '12 at 13:54
1  
@kh25: Are you able to create views in that database? I would suggest creating a view on top of the table(s) with text columns, except convert the text column to varchar(max), then query from the view with LINQ. –  Cory Apr 20 '12 at 13:56
1  
1  
@Cory I unfortunately have no means to modify the database at this stage. If I had I'd change the field to a varchar. As for being a duplicate I can't use the same solution due to not having the access required to the db. This is a third party db that we have no control over. –  kh25 Apr 20 '12 at 13:59
    
If you do this Notes = s.PlacementNotes.ToString(); will it convert it early enough in the underlying SQL call? –  Brad Rem Apr 20 '12 at 15:01

2 Answers 2

Which columns are the text type?

One idea may be to not write the Distinct() such that it does it in SQL. You could query out the data into a concrete set of objects, and then use LINQ to Objects to attempt the Distinct().

Starting with what you have, turn that original query into a list of Vacancy Summaries:

var query = (from s in db.tSearches
            join c in db.tCompanies on s.CompanyGUID equals c.GUID
            join cl in db.tCompanyLocations on s.LocationGUID equals cl.GUID
            join st in db.tSearchTypes on s.SearchTypeGUID equals st.GUID
            where s.DateClosed == null                        
            select new VacancySummary()
            {
                Id = s.GUID,
                Departments = string.Empty,
                Type = st.GUID,
                Location = cl.LocationName,
                Company = (s.Confidential) ? String.Empty : c.CompanyName,
                DateOpened = s.DateOpened,
                Notes = s.PlacementNotes,
                Closed = s.DateClosed != null
            }).ToList();

Your query object will now be a List<VacancySummary> instead of an IQueryable<anonymous type>. You may need to override Equals() on your VacancySummary class in order for the distinct to work, but your return simply becomes:

return query.Distinct().Skip(skip).Take(take);

UPDATE: Looks like you will have to approach this as you did in your other question about the same issue.

UPDATE 2: Ever heard of Model Defined Functions in the Entity Framework? Check out this article. You can create conceptual functions (e.g. one that knows how to convert your text column to a varchar(max) (i.e. CONVERT(varchar(max), PlacementNotes))). You can then create some code to use in your LINQ query that will get included in the generated SQL. No idea if it will work for you but maybe worth a shot!

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Thanks @Cory - PlacementNotes is the offender. I am trying to prevent executing the ToList() before the Skip and Take due to the massive difference in the amount of data that will be returned for each user (this has possible implications for charges to the customer as they will be billed for the amount of data they are returning). If this is not possible I would break the initial query up into 2 separate queries. –  kh25 Apr 20 '12 at 14:16
1  
@kh25: You could leave the PlacementNotes out of the query altogether, and then look it up later by tSearches.GUID (VacancySummary.Id). –  Cory Apr 20 '12 at 14:48
    
That does indeed seem like the way to go if there's no way of doing what's required in the one hit to the database. If I go for that solution I'll post up the details later. –  kh25 Apr 20 '12 at 15:09
    
@kh25: I updated my answer with another suggestion; see "UPDATE 2". –  Cory Apr 20 '12 at 18:57
    
Thanks @Cory - I'll have a look later today. –  kh25 Apr 24 '12 at 11:11

Not a linq user, but in tsql we would just cast it to varchar which is comparable. Try using ToString() or Expression.Convert and, if necessary, truncating the field if it's large, like over 8000 characters.

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