Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm working on an app where I need to call one of two data methods based on the generic type of the calling class. For example, if T is of type Foo, I'll call data.GetFoo():

private static List<T> GetObjectList(DateTime mostRecentProcessedReadTime)
{
    using (MesReportingDal data = new MesReportingDal())
    {
        return data.GetFoo(mostRecentProcessedReadTime);  // Notice GetFoo()
    }
}

And if T is of type Bar, I'll call data.GetBar():

private static List<T> GetObjectList(DateTime mostRecentProcessedReadTime)
{
    using (MesReportingDal data = new MesReportingDal())
    {
        return data.GetBar(mostRecentProcessedReadTime);  // Notice GetBar()
    }
}

Before now, I only needed one DAL method because all types were retrieved the same way. I now need to call one of two methods, depending on the type of T.

I'm trying to avoid something like this:

private static List<T> GetObjectList(DateTime mostRecentProcessedReadTime)
{
    using (MesReportingDal data = new MesReportingDal())
    {
        if (T is Foo) { return data.GetFoo(mostRecentProcessedReadTime); }
        if (T is Bar) { return data.GetBar(mostRecentProcessedReadTime); }
    }
}

This violates OCP. Is there an elegant way to handle this, so I can get rid of my if statement?

Edit - This is what the types look like

public partial class Foo1 : IDataEntity { }
public partial class Foo2 : IDataEntity { }
public partial class Bar1 : IDataEntity { }
public partial class Bar2 : IDataEntity { }

These Foos and Bars are the DBML items used with Linq-to-SQL.

share|improve this question
    
do you have a control over 'T' classes - can they be changed, do you have base interface/class etc. –  NSGaga Apr 20 '12 at 13:54
    
See my edit. Does that help? –  Bob Horn Apr 20 '12 at 13:57
    
If you don't wish to change Foo*, Bar* and it has to be GetFoo, GetBar - not Get() as ataddeini suggested (if I understood right?). How do you intend to 'call' the GetObjectList()? are you defining e.g. Foo, Bar before the call (so you have e.g. a typed variable) - or you want to call this in some highly generic way (using T from another generic method)? Easiest is what ataddeini said, if you can. –  NSGaga Apr 20 '12 at 14:19
    
The use of static worries me already. Can you explain how you think this violates OCP? Without context, it's hard to tell. –  jeyoung Apr 20 '12 at 14:47
    
@NSGaga I might be able to do what ataddeini said. I haven't had time just yet. I'll check it out soon. –  Bob Horn Apr 20 '12 at 15:08

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I would change GetFoo and GetBar to just be Get, and make MesReportingDal a generic too.

So I think you would end up with something like this:

private static List<T> GetObjectList(DateTime mostRecentProcessedReadTime)
{
    using (var data = new MesReportingDal<T>())
    {
        return data.Get(mostRecentProcessedReadTime);        
    }
}

Incidentally, having the using statement also requires that the MesReportingDal implements IDisposable, otherwise you'll get the following compile error:

'MesReportingDal': type used in a using statement must be implicitly convertible to 'System.IDisposable'

UPDATE

So after thinking about this some more and reading your feedback, one option you have is to extract a repository interface and push the creation back to a factory method. This will allow you to maintain the single data.Get(...) call, but with different implementations based on T

public interface IRepository<T> : IDisposable
{
    IList<T> Get(DateTime mostRecentRead);
}

public class FooRepo : IRepository<Foo>
{
    public IList<Foo> Get(DateTime mostRecentRead)
    {
        // Foo Implementation
    }
}

public class BarRepo : IRepository<Bar>
{
    public IList<Bar> Get(DateTime mostRecentRead)
    {
        // Bar Implemenation
    }
}

Your factory could then look something like this

public class RepositoryFactory
{
    public static IRepository<T> CreateRepository<T>()
    {
        IRepository<T> repo = null;
        Type forType = typeof(T);

        if (forType == typeof(Foo))
        {
            repo = new FooRepo() as IRepository<T>;
        }
        else if (forType == typeof(Bar))
        {
            repo = new BarRepo() as IRepository<T>;
        }

        return repo;
    }
}

And this would allow you to keep your initial code block clean

private static IList<T> GetObjectList(DateTime mostRecentProcessedReadTime)
{
    using (var data = RepositoryFactory.CreateRepository<T>())
    {
        return data.Get(mostRecentProcessedReadTime);
    }
}

Hope that helps.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't know that this will work, and it may be because I wasn't very clear. The data.Get() method has different implementations based on the type. The algorithm within Get() is different. –  Bob Horn Apr 20 '12 at 15:52
    
@BobHorn Right, ok. Thinking about this more, I keep coming back to a repository interface and a factory. I'll try to update shortly with an example. –  ataddeini Apr 21 '12 at 12:21
    
Thanks. While this pushes the if logic somewhere else, it indeed keeps the consuming code clean. I was hoping to avoid if logic altogether, but this solution at least keeps it within a factory. I think my only other option is reflection, but this can work for now. –  Bob Horn Apr 21 '12 at 17:51
    
FYI, This line ends up returning null: repo = new FooRepo() as IRepository<T>; I don't need it solved, but I at least wanted to let you know. –  Bob Horn Apr 23 '12 at 13:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.