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I frequently use sorted and groupby to find duplicates items in an iterable. Now I see it is unreliable:

from itertools import groupby
data = 3 * ('x ',  (1,), u'x')
duplicates = [k for k, g in groupby(sorted(data)) if len(list(g)) > 1]
print duplicates
# [] printed - no duplicates found - like 9 unique values

The reason why the code above fails in Python 2.x is explained here.

What is a reliable pythonic way of finding duplicates?

I looked for similar questions/answers on SO. The best of them is "In Python, how do I take a list and reduce it to a list of duplicates?", but the accepted solution is not pythonic (it is procedural multiline for ... if ... add ... else ... add ... return result) and other solutions are unreliable (depends on unfulfilled transitivity of "<" operator) or are slow (O n*n).

[EDIT] Closed. The accepted answer helped me to summarize conclusions in my answer below more general.

I like to use builtin types to represent e.g. tree structures. This is why I am afraid of mix now.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Note: Assumes entries are hashable

>>> from collections import Counter
>>> data = 3 * ('x ',  (1,), u'x')
>>> [k for k, c in Counter(data).iteritems() if c > 1]
[u'x', 'x ', (1,)]
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What is the time complexity here? O(n * ln(n))? –  Akavall Apr 20 '12 at 14:37
    
Does this assume all list entries are hashable (since you are creating Counter keys with them)? What if there were a list as one of the elements of data? –  Paul McGuire Apr 20 '12 at 15:00
    
When I think more about it more, I think that time complexity is actually O(n). When Counter creates a dictionary, we have to go through each element once, then when we are looping through a dictionary, you also look at each element once (and look up time is constant). Hence, when the size of the problem increases, the time to execute it increases in linear proportion, that is O(n). –  Akavall Apr 20 '12 at 18:39
    
The time complexity is O(n * ln(n)). (1000 tests by 1000 items is 2x faster that 1000000 items) For hashable data it is an ideal solution. –  hynekcer Apr 20 '12 at 18:44
    
Serching complexity is linear, dictionary creating is linear approx. until 1000 items. Then it looks like n * ln(n). The difference 2x slower or faster is unimportant. –  hynekcer Apr 21 '12 at 6:08
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Conclusion:

  • If all items are hashable and is at least Python 2.7, the best solution is above with collections.Counter.
  • If some items are not hashable or Python 2.7+ is not present, then the solution groupby(sorted(..)) is very good under conditions
    • not combine str and unicode or
    • not use any type with the name placed aphabetically between "str" and "unicode". (typically "tuple" or "type")
  • If data are unhashable and of mixed types, nothing above can be used and then the best is to use:
    • Counter(map(pickled.dumps, data)) instead of Counter(data) and finally unpickle it or
    • groupby(sorted(data, key=pickled.dumps)) if unpickling is undesirable or no python 2.7
  • A "naive solution" discussed below can be better than pickling for very small number of items approximately less than 300.

All other solutions in other questions are worse currently.

Notes:

  • It looks that the class Counter can be copied&pasted to lower Python versions.
  • A "naive solution" that searches every item in whole data can be used for very small number of items. It has the advantage that does not require hashable data and does not depend on transitivity of default "<" operator, but for more than 25 hashable items is better the counter and for more than 300 unhashable "wild" items is better the counter on pickled items.

I thought about presorting items by type or extend them by hash for hashable items, it helps currently, but it is not a safe solution because the same problem would be with "<" operator insite lists, tuples etc.

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This subject is interesting to me, so I timed the above solution vs the solution accepted in the other thread.

The Counter method is this thread is very elegant; however, accepted answer in this thread In Python, how do I take a list and reduce it to a list of duplicates? seems to be about 2 times faster.

import random as rn
import timeit
from collections import Counter

a = [rn.randint(0,100000) for i in xrange(10000)]

def counter_way(x):
    return [k for k,v in Counter(x).iteritems() if v > 1]

def accepted_way(x): #accepted answer in the linked thread
    duplicates = set()
    found = set()
    for item in x:
        if item in found:
            duplicates.add(item)
        else:         
            found.add(item)
    return duplicates


t1 = timeit.timeit('counter_way(a)', 'from __main__ import counter_way, a', number = 100)
print "counter_way: ", t1
t2 = timeit.timeit('accepted_way(a)','from __main__ import accepted_way, a', number = 100)
print "accepted_way: ", t2

Results:

counter_way:  1.15775845813
accepted_way:  0.531060022992

I tried this under different specifications and the result always the same.

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I appreciate on collections.Counter that frequency can be easy found out. I wished it in the mind, but I didn't want to lose a good idea by too restrictive conditions. Can you write a more efficient counter? –  hynekcer Apr 21 '12 at 20:24
    
I think for what it does Counter is as efficient as it is. And you are right that Counter also provides frequency for every item, but the price for that is longer run time. In counter method, we first loop through every item in the list and get frequencies for every item, and then we loop the the dictionary create by Counter to get items that showed up more than ones. In the other method we just loop through every item once. –  Akavall Apr 21 '12 at 21:37
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However, there is a pitfall in both solutions. The reason is that it merges the values with the same hash. So, it depends on whether the used values may have the same hash. It is not that crazy comment as you may think (I was also surprised earlier), because Python hashes some values the special way. Try:

from collections import Counter


def counter_way(x):
    return [k for k,v in Counter(x).iteritems() if v > 1]

def accepted_way(x): #accepted answer in the linked thread
    duplicates = set()
    found = set()
    for item in x:
        if item in found:
            duplicates.add(item)
        else:         
            found.add(item)
    return duplicates


a = ('x ',  (1,), u'x') * 2

print 'The values:', a
print 'Counter way duplicates:', counter_way(a)
print 'Accepted way duplicates:', accepted_way(a)
print '-' * 50

# Now the problematic values.
a = 2 * (0, 1, True, False, 0.0, 1.0)

print 'The values:', a
print 'Counter way duplicates:', counter_way(a)
print 'Accepted way duplicates:', accepted_way(a)

The 1, 1.0, and True have the same hash by definition, and similarly the 0, 0.0, and False. It prints the following on my console (think about the last two lines -- all the values should actually be duplicates):

c:\tmp\___python\hynekcer\so10247815>python d.py
The values: ('x ', (1,), u'x', 'x ', (1,), u'x')
Counter way duplicates: [u'x', 'x ', (1,)]
Accepted way duplicates: set([u'x', 'x ', (1,)])
--------------------------------------------------
The values: (0, 1, True, False, 0.0, 1.0, 0, 1, True, False, 0.0, 1.0)
Counter way duplicates: [0, 1]
Accepted way duplicates: set([False, True])
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This is not a pitfal, this is how equality == is defined in Python: assert 0 == 0.0 == False and 1 == 1.0 == True and 'a' == u'a'. Even complex numbers can be equal 1 == 1.0 + 0.0j. If you want to compare exactly and use also composed types like tuples, you should compare pickled representation as the only possible solution. You can verify that dictionary keys are unique even if they have the same hash. (Create a dictionary on 32 bit system with one million random tuples as keys. With probability more than 99% you find some the same hashes but different keys.) –  hynekcer Apr 23 '12 at 8:04
    
Well, expectations may differ. However, I can imagine the [0, False] be considered as the list of unique values. –  pepr Apr 23 '12 at 16:08
    
pepr: What is your method? How you test that 0 an False are different in Python? –  hynekcer Apr 23 '12 at 16:35
    
@hynekcer: I am not arguing. I consider the solution just fine. I would also personally chosen such. This behaviour is probably not surprising for you, but some other people may be surprised. Then, it is good to know. The comparison operator can be extended for example for sort() to observe the values as different (... and type(a) == type(b)). Nevertheless, the values will always be the same when hashing is used. –  pepr Apr 24 '12 at 6:28
    
@hynekcer: See the added possible solution based on sorting. But it is slow. –  pepr Apr 24 '12 at 7:54
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Just because I was curious, here is the solution that makes a difference between 0, False, 0.0, etc. It is based on sorting the sequence with my_cmp that takes into consideration also the type of the item. It is very slow in comparison with the above mentioned solutions, of course. This is because of sorting. But compare the results!

import sys
import timeit
from collections import Counter

def empty(x):
    return

def counter_way(x):
    return [k for k,v in Counter(x).iteritems() if v > 1]

def accepted_way(x): #accepted answer in the linked thread
    duplicates = set()
    found = set()
    for item in x:
        if item in found:
            duplicates.add(item)
        else:         
            found.add(item)
    return duplicates


def my_cmp(a, b):
    result = cmp(a, b)
    if result == 0:
        return cmp(id(type(a)), id(type(b)))
    return result    


def duplicates_via_sort_with_types(x, my_cmp=my_cmp):

    last = '*** the value that cannot be in the sequence by definition ***'
    duplicates = []
    added = False
    for e in sorted(x, cmp=my_cmp):
        if my_cmp(e, last) == 0:
            ##print 'equal:', repr(e), repr(last), added
            if not added:
                duplicates.append(e)
                ##print 'appended:', e
                added = True
        else:
            ##print 'different:', repr(e), repr(last), added
            last = e
            added = False
    return duplicates


a = [0, 1, True, 'a string', u'a string', False, 0.0, 1.0, 2, 2.0, 1000000, 1000000.0] * 1000

print 'Counter way duplicates:', counter_way(a)
print 'Accepted way duplicates:', accepted_way(a)
print 'Via enhanced sort:', duplicates_via_sort_with_types(a) 
print '-' * 50

# ... and the timing
t3 = timeit.timeit('empty(a)','from __main__ import empty, a', number = 100)
print "empty: ", t3
t1 = timeit.timeit('counter_way(a)', 'from __main__ import counter_way, a', number = 100)
print "counter_way: ", t1
t2 = timeit.timeit('accepted_way(a)','from __main__ import accepted_way, a', number = 100)
print "accepted_way: ", t2
t4 = timeit.timeit('duplicates_via_sort_with_types(a)','from __main__ import duplicates_via_sort_with_types, a', number = 100)
print "duplicates_via_sort_with_types: ", t4

It prints on my console:

c:\tmp\___python\hynekcer\so10247815>python e.py
Counter way duplicates: [0, 1, 2, 'a string', 1000000]
Accepted way duplicates: set([False, True, 2.0, u'a string', 1000000.0])
Via enhanced sort: [False, 0.0, 0, True, 1.0, 1, 2.0, 2, 1000000.0, 1000000, 'a string', u'a string']
--------------------------------------------------
empty:  2.11195471969e-05
counter_way:  0.76977053612
accepted_way:  0.496547434023
duplicates_via_sort_with_types:  11.2378848197
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This solution is focused on simple types but fails on composed types. Example: a = [(0,), (False,)] + [('x ',), ((),), (u'x',)] * 10000, expression duplicates_via_sort_with_types(a), result: [(False,)] Does not recognize 0 and False as you want consider them different, does not recognize values that are exactly the same on the other side. –  hynekcer Apr 24 '12 at 12:42
    
@hynekcer: Yes, you are right. –  pepr Apr 24 '12 at 13:03
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