Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Say I have some code like this:

try:
    try:
        raise Exception("in the try")
    finally:
        raise Exception("in the finally")
except Exception, e:
    print "try block failed: %s" % (e,)

The output is:

try block failed: in the finally

From the point of that print statement, is there any way to access the exception raised in the try, or has it disappeared forever?

NOTE: I don't have a use case in mind; this is just curiosity.

share|improve this question
up vote 12 down vote accepted

I can't find any information about whether this has been backported and don't have a Py2 installation handy, but in Python 3, e has an attribute called e.__context__, so that:

try:
    try:
        raise Exception("in the try")
    finally:
        raise Exception("in the finally")
except Exception as e:
    print(repr(e.__context__))

gives:

Exception('in the try',)

According to PEP 3314, before __context__ was added, information about the original exception was unavailable.

share|improve this answer
    
nice, but py3 only. anyways: +1. – ch3ka Apr 20 '12 at 14:57
1  
ah, nice. so according to that PEP, the answer is, "you can't, in Py2, but you can in Py3". thanks! – Claudiu Apr 20 '12 at 15:26
try:
    try:
        raise Exception("in the try")
    except Exception, e:
        print "try block failed"
    finally:
        raise Exception("in the finally")
except Exception, e:
    print "finally block failed: %s" % (e,)

However, It would be a good idea to avoid having code that is likely to throw an exception in the finally block - usually you just use it to do cleanup etc. anyway.

share|improve this answer
2  
That just swallows the "in the try" exception before it gets to the finally block. – Mechanical snail Aug 22 '13 at 7:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.