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I have separated certain statements to be applied on a specific element in a separate template.
The element is processed in one template, which contains a statement <xsl:apply-templates/>.
Is there a way to have an element just processed in the first template, to be re-processed in the second (non-named) template?
Of course I know that I could use a named template and call that from the first template, but I am just wondering whether it could be done like this. To give you something to work with, here's a heavily simplified model of the stuff I am working on.
I have an html input file containing a table:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<table>
    <tbody>
        <tr>
            <td>content</td>
            <td></td>
            <td/>
        </tr>
    </tbody>
</table>

I wish to have a block element inside each td element that encloses the td string content if there is one, or is empty when the td element itself is empty. I tried the following (note again that I do not wish to do major changes in the first template!):

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
    <xsl:output method="xml" version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" indent="yes"/>

    <xsl:template match="*">
        <xsl:copy>
            <xsl:attribute name="test"><xsl:value-of select="local-name()"/></xsl:attribute>
            <xsl:apply-templates/>
        </xsl:copy>
    </xsl:template>

    <xsl:template match="td/text()">
        <block><xsl:value-of select="."/></block>
    </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

Where the added attribute is just a modelled example of the stuff that is being done in the first template.

which gives as output

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<table test="table">
    <tbody test="tbody">
        <tr test="tr">
            <td test="td">
                <block>content</block>
            </td>
            <td test="td"/>
            <td test="td"/>
        </tr>
    </tbody>
</table>

and I wish to get

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<table test="table">
    <tbody test="tbody">
        <tr test="tr">
            <td test="td">
                <block>content</block>
            </td>
            <td test="td">
                <block/>
            </td>
            <td test="td">
                <block/>
            </td>
        </tr>
    </tbody>
</table>

It is clear why it did not work: there is no text node in the empty td elements, so these are not matched by the second template's Xpath expression.
So I started thinking about ways to re-process the td elements itself by a second template. Of course, I can not use match="td[some condition]" because then the first template will not be applied.
And I can also not use match= "self::td" because the self axis is not allowed in template match attributes (except in conditions of course), or rather, it needs a current node which you don't have yet when starting to match.
So is there a suitable Xpath expression available for the second template that will give me what I want?
Or is there another simple way to trigger another (non-named) template for an element just processed in one template?
Note: I am not looking for simple updates on the second template, that add the attribute there. I wish the first template to add the attribute, and the second to add the block elements.

share|improve this question
    
I deleted my original answer. Have you tried creating a moded match="td" template? You could then do something like <xsl:apply-templates select="ancestor-or-self::td" mode="foo"/>. –  Daniel Haley Apr 20 '12 at 16:03
    
Yes tried that but did not succeed - but then I could have made a mistake so I will retry. –  Maestro13 Apr 20 '12 at 16:18
    
Glad you got it working. I added a new answer. +1 for a good question. –  Daniel Haley Apr 20 '12 at 18:22

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try adding another "moded" template. You should be able to use xsl:apply-templates with the mode.

Example xsl:template:

<xsl:template match="td" mode="test">
  <bar>test</bar>
</xsl:template>

Example xsl:apply-templates:

<xsl:template match="td">
  <foo><xsl:apply-templates select="ancestor-or-self::td" mode="test"/></foo>
</xsl:template>
share|improve this answer
    
Yes I was able to use something similar - silly I tried it earlier but made a mistake and thought that using mode-attribute would not help. Thanks for helping me back on track! –  Maestro13 Apr 20 '12 at 18:42

Look at xsl:next-match in XSLT 2.0 or xsl:apply-imports in XSLT 1.0.

share|improve this answer
    
Will xsl:apply-imports be able to do something that a template in the original xslt cannot do? –  Maestro13 Apr 20 '12 at 16:30
1  
@Maestro13 it isn't necessarily that it can do something the original can't, just a different way of doing things. Rather than having to use a mode, you can have simple logic in different stylesheets and decide when to apply it. Imported templates have a lower precedence than the templates from the importing stylesheet. <xsl:apply-imports> allows you to tell the processor to use the templates from the imported stylesheet while inside of a template from the top level importing stylesheet. –  Mads Hansen Apr 21 '12 at 0:03
    
@MadsHansen learned something new again today - thanks! –  Maestro13 Apr 21 '12 at 7:48
    
@MichaelKay Michael your answer was OK - just a little too brief for me to realize its deeper meaning - Mads luckily provided the rest of the story so now I see that this is indeed a viable alternative to using modes. –  Maestro13 Apr 21 '12 at 8:22
    
Sorry about the terseness. When I'm too busy to give a full tutorial, I reckon it's still helpful to point people in the right direction: there's plenty of information out there once you've got a keyword. –  Michael Kay Apr 21 '12 at 17:50

An XSLT 1.0 solution that uses <xsl:apply-imports>

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">

    <xsl:import href="block.xsl" />

    <xsl:output method="xml" version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" indent="yes"/>

    <xsl:template match="*">
        <xsl:copy>
            <xsl:attribute name="test"><xsl:value-of select="local-name()"/></xsl:attribute>
            <xsl:if test="self::td">
                <xsl:apply-imports/>
            </xsl:if>  
            <xsl:apply-templates/>
        </xsl:copy>
    </xsl:template>

</xsl:stylesheet>

The imported stylesheet block.xsl:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<xsl:stylesheet xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
    version="1.0">

    <xsl:template match="td">
        <block><xsl:value-of select="."/></block>
    </xsl:template>

</xsl:stylesheet>

An XSLT 2.0 solution that uses <xsl:next-match>:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<xsl:stylesheet version="2.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
    <xsl:output method="xml" version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" indent="yes"/>

    <xsl:template match="*">
        <xsl:copy>
            <xsl:attribute name="test"><xsl:value-of select="local-name()"/></xsl:attribute>
            <xsl:if test="self::td">
                <!--apply the next template that would match this td element -->
                <xsl:next-match/>
            </xsl:if>  
            <xsl:apply-templates/>
        </xsl:copy>
    </xsl:template>

    <!--calculated priority of "td" would be higher than "*",
        so explicitly setting a lower priority -->
    <xsl:template match="td" priority="-1">
        <block><xsl:value-of select="."/></block>
    </xsl:template>

</xsl:stylesheet>
share|improve this answer
    
A good alternative indeed - both XSLT 1.0 and 2.0 solutions are very usable. Especially the 2.0 one is intuitively pleasing as it does exactly what is required: re-process an element with a lower-priority template. –  Maestro13 Apr 21 '12 at 8:19

For completeness, I add the solution I arrived at by DevNull's answer.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
    <xsl:output method="xml" version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" indent="yes"/>

    <xsl:template match="*">
        <xsl:copy>
            <xsl:attribute name="test"><xsl:value-of select="local-name()"/></xsl:attribute>
            <xsl:apply-templates/>
            <xsl:apply-templates mode="td" select="self::td"/>
        </xsl:copy>
    </xsl:template>

    <xsl:template match="td" mode="td">
        <block><xsl:value-of select="."/></block>
    </xsl:template>

    <xsl:template match="td/text()"/>
</xsl:stylesheet>

which results in

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<table test="table">
    <tbody test="tbody">
        <tr test="tr">
            <td test="td">
                <block>content</block>
            </td>
            <td test="td">
                <block></block>
            </td>
            <td test="td">
                <block></block>
            </td>
        </tr>
    </tbody>
</table>

Note the added template to prevent processing td text nodes a second time by default templates.

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