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Is there a way to make Eclipse's built-in Java code formatter ignore comments? Whenever I run it, it turns this:

    /*
     * PSEUDOCODE
     * Read in user's string/paragraph
     * 
     * Three cases are possible
     * Case 1: foobar
     *         do case 1 things
     * Case 2: fred hacker
     *         do case 2 things
     * Case 3: cowboyneal
     *         do case 3 things
     *         
     * In all cases, do some other thing
     */

into this:

    /*
     * PSEUDOCODE Read in user's string/paragraph
     * 
     * Three cases are possible Case 1: foobar do case 1 things Case 2: fred
     * hacker do case 2 things Case 3: cowboyneal do case 3 things
     * 
     * In all cases, do some other thing
     */

I have already played around with the Windows > Preferences > Java > Code Style > Formatter settings but can't find one for keeping comment formatting. I'm using Eclipse 3.4.0.

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It's right there in the Formatter config, I don't know how you're missing it. Edit the profile, there's a dialog box with 8 tabs, the last tab is for comment formatting. –  skaffman Jun 21 '09 at 23:16
    
I do see the comment tab, but the formatting problems happen no matter what combination of checkboxes I use. –  Pops Jun 25 '09 at 1:42
    
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8 Answers

up vote 18 down vote accepted

With the Java Formatter (Windows > Preferences > Java > Code Style > Formatter), you can create a new Formatter profile.

In the Comments tab (in eclipse3.5), you can make sure, in the "Javadoc comment settings", to uncheck "Format HTML tags".
Check also the "Never join lines" in the "General settings" section.

Then your comment should be written as:

/**
 * PSEUDOCODE
 * Read in user's string/paragraph
 * 
 * Three cases are possible:
 * <dl>
 *   <dt>Case 1: foobar</dt>
 *     <dd>        do case 1 things</dd>
 *   <dt>Case 2: fred hacker</dt>
 *     <dd>        do case 2 things</dd>
 *   <dt>Case 3: cowboyneal</dt>
 *     <dd>        do case 3 things</dd>
 * </dl>        
 * In all cases, do some other thing
 */

Note: I have made a Javadoc comment, and not a simple comment, as I believe a comment with that much text in it may be better placed in front of a method. Plus, Javadoc sections have more formatting parameters to play with.
If it is in front of a method (true Javadoc), the HTML tags <dl>, <dt> and <dd> will help to present it properly within the Javadoc view.

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The relevant part of this answer, for me, was that the HTML tags are NOT automatically inserted at line breaks and the like. Probably obvious to most, but I didn't realize I had to hand-code things like <br>s until I saw it here. –  Pops Jan 12 '10 at 16:00
    
@Lord Torgamus: not only you have to add thosetags, but the first sentence requires a periode and a space, before the <br />! (see bugs.sun.com/bugdatabase/view_bug.do?bug_id=4165985) –  VonC Jan 12 '10 at 16:14
    
This is a good tip, but in the example I think it should be <dt> instead of <df>. AFAIK, <df> is not a valid html tag. –  flightplanner Jan 31 '13 at 10:59
    
@flightplanner good point. I have updated the answer to reflect the proper HTML tag. –  VonC Jan 31 '13 at 13:06
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There is another solution that you can use to suppress the formatting of specific block comments. Use /*- (note the hyphen) at the beginning of the block comment, and the formatting won't be affected if you format the rest of the file.

/*-
 * Here is a block comment with some very special
 * formatting that I want indent(1) to ignore.
 *
 *    one
 *        two
 *            three
 */

Source: http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/documentation/codeconventions-141999.html#350

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Never seen that before, even out of context. +1! –  Pops Mar 29 '11 at 2:19
1  
I wish I had known about this (i.e., searched for the solution) earlier. –  skrounge Nov 2 '11 at 19:48
7  
Sadly, this only works with "regular" block comments, not Javadoc comments. –  Pops Jan 11 '12 at 3:19
1  
Never seen that. Why isn't this the accepted answer? –  sadiq.ali Nov 26 '12 at 10:15
1  
this does not work anymore in my eclipse indigo, it doesn't join the lines but removes all the indentation –  redDevil Nov 28 '12 at 12:41
show 4 more comments

I just learned from a co-worker that Eclipse offers special formatting tags that can be used for this:

// @formatter:off
/*
 * ╔════════╦═══════╦══════════╗
 * ║ Month  ║ Sales ║ Position ║
 * ╠════════╬═══════╬══════════╣
 * ║ June   ║ 44k   ║ 2nd      ║
 * ║ July   ║ 39k   ║ 2nd      ║
 * ║ August ║ 49k   ║ 4th      ║
 * ╚════════╩═══════╩══════════╝
 *
 * This comment shouldn't be formatted, and will now be ignored by the formatter.
 */
// @formatter:on

Note that you may need to manually enable this feature through the Preferences menu → Java > Code Style > Formatter, clicking on Edit, selecting the Off/On Tags tab and checking Enable Off/On tags (source).

A quick Google for the string @formatter:off brought me to this other SO answer, which mentioned this feature in the context of disabling the formatter for code blocks. I've confirmed that it works for line comments, "normal" block comments and Javadoc block comments as well.

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How did you make it work for JavaDoc comments? I've found I had to put line comments before and after the JavaDoc comments for this to work, like you did for the block comment in this answer. I was hoping I could turn off formatting just for a section of a JavaDoc comment. –  Michael Scheper Feb 18 '13 at 4:01
    
@MichaelScheper it's been a while, and I don't remember exactly... did you try VonC's advice? –  Pops Feb 19 '13 at 15:22
    
Nice one. Thanks! +1 –  Burkhard Oct 10 '13 at 11:46
    
This is excellent, because it tells eclipse to dont format code as well. Useful when you want to keep your own formatting. –  Martin Wickman Mar 5 at 8:32
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Surround the specific text with <pre> </pre> tags.

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Another possibility is to use HTML's <pre> in Javadoc:

/**
 * <pre>
 *    this
 *   is
 *      kept
 *  as
 *    is
 * </pre>
 */

At least this is how I tend to embed my ASCII-art in source code comments :)

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In Eclipse 3.4: Preferences, Java->Code Style->Formatter, then edit profile, comments tab. There's a bunch of options there for controlling comment formatting.

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It is language-dependent.

For example, if working with javascript, you would go to "Window -> Preferences -> Javascript -> Code Style -> Formatter" and then edit the formatter options.

Edit (reflecting changesin OP Questions

For editing java code formatting, go to "Window -> Preferences -> Java -> Code Style -> Formatter"

At the top of the panel you will see

Active Profile:
Eclipse [built-in]

From there you have one button to the right, "Edit", and two below, "New..." and "Import...". I would recommend Editing the existing profile.

In the edit profile dialog, there are a series of tabs along the top. The last tab is "Comments". To completely disable comment formatting, uncheck "Enable Javadoc comment formatting", "Enable block comment formatting", "Enable line comment formatting", and "Enable header comment formatting".

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Answer tested only in Eclipse:

  • The problem with the accepted answer (Java Formatter (Windows > Preferences > Java > Code Style > Formatter), you can create a new Formatter profile) you influence every javadoc in your code. Maybe this is not desirable for other parts of the code that have to be formatted.
  • The problem with the /*- solution, is that it only works with "regular" block comments, not Javadoc comments (as pointed out by Pops)

My proposal would be simply to use html tags. You can for example wrap the text after the break in p tags, in order to see the extra newline in the rendered html. Here is how your example would look like (I added some more text and used p for case 1):

/**
* PSEUDOCODE<br>
* 
* Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consetetur sadipscing elitr, sed diam nonumy
* eirmod tempor invidunt ut labore et dolore magna aliquyam erat, sed diam
* voluptua. At vero eos et accusam et justo duo dolores et ea rebum. Stet
* clita kasd gubergren, no sea takimata sanctus est Lorem ipsum dolor sit
* amet. <br>
* 
* Three cases are possible:<br>
* 
* Case 1: foobar<br>
* <p>
* Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consetetur sadipscing elitr, sed diam nonumy
* eirmod tempor invidunt ut labore et dolore magna aliquyam erat, sed diam
* voluptua. At vero eos et accusam et justo duo dolores et ea rebum.
* </p>
* 
* Case 2: fred hacker do case 2 things<br>
* 
* Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consetetur sadipscing elitr, sed diam nonumy
* eirmod tempor invidunt ut labore et dolore magna aliquyam erat, sed diam
* voluptua. At vero eos et accusam et justo duo dolores et ea rebum.<br>
* 
* Case 3: cowboyneal<br>
* 
* Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consetetur sadipscing elitr, sed diam nonumy
* eirmod tempor invidunt ut labore et dolore magna aliquyam erat, sed diam
* voluptua. At vero eos et accusam et justo duo dolores et ea rebum.
*/
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