Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

using node http package it doesn't seem possible to catch the exception caused by opening a bad URL. This is a problem, because it kills my cluster, which I'd like to guarantee will live forever

Here's the code: (uses fibers.promise)

function openConnection(dest, port, contentType, method, throwErrorOnBadStatus)
{
  "use strict";
  assert.ok(dest, "generalUtilities.openConnection: dest is null");
  //dest = dest.replace('//','/');
  console.log('opening connection: ' + dest + " contentType: " + contentType);
  var prom = promise(),
    errProm = promise(),
    ar = [],
    urlParts = url.parse(dest),
    httpClient,
    req,
    got,
    res;
  //console.log('urlParts.port: ' + urlParts.port);
  if (port) {
    urlParts.port = port;
  } else if (!urlParts.port) {
    urlParts.port = 80;
  }
  if (contentType) {
    urlParts.accept = contentType;
  } else {
    urlParts.contentType = 'text/html';
  }
  if (!urlParts.method) {
    if (method) {
      urlParts.method = method;
    } else {
      urlParts.method = 'GET';
    }
  }
  try {
    httpClient = http.createClient(urlParts.port, urlParts.hostname);
    req = httpClient.request(urlParts.method, urlParts.path, urlParts);
  //console.log('req: ' + req);
  //if (req.connection) {
  //  req.connection.setTimeout(HTTP_REQUEST_TIMEOUT);
  //}
  //else {
  //  throw new Error ("No Connection Established!");
  //}
      req.end();
    req.on('response', prom);
    req.on('error', errProm);
    got = promise.waitAny(prom, errProm);
    if (got === errProm) {
      //assert.ifError(errProm.get(), HTTP_REQUEST_TIMEOUT_MSG + dest);
      throw new Error(HTTP_REQUEST_TIMEOUT_MSG + dest + ': ' + got.get());
    }
    res = prom.get();
    ar.res = res;
    ar.statusCode = res.statusCode;
    if (ar.statusCode >= 300 && throwErrorOnBadStatus) {
      assert.ifError("page not found!");
    }
    return ar;
  }
  catch (err) {
    console.log(err);
  }
}

and here's how I tested it

var promise = require('fibers-promise');
var gu = require("../src/utils/generalutilities.js");

var brokenSite = 'http://foo.bar.com:94//foo.js';
promise.start(function () {
  try {
    gu.openConnection(brokenSite, null, null, "GET", true);
  }
  catch (err) {
    console.log('got: ' + err);
  }
});

When I run this code I get:

Error: getaddrinfo ENOENT. It is never caught in the try catch

share|improve this question
    
Please use proper code formatting in the future. You just indent the whole code block by four spaces. Do not use <pre><code>. – loganfsmyth Apr 20 '12 at 16:15
    
So, what is the stack trace on the error? – loganfsmyth Apr 20 '12 at 16:26
up vote 2 down vote accepted

It works for me, when supplying an error handler for the request:

req.on('error', errorHandler);

I see that you also do that, but you set it after issuing

req.end();

Could you try issuing the end() after you attached the error handler?

As a side note, I really recommend request, as it handles issues like this with sensible defaults. It's really a breeze to work with.

Edit: Here is a simple example showing that attaching an error handler lets me handle ENOENT/ENOTFOUND errors:

var http = require('http');

var req = http.request({hostname: 'foo.example.com'}, function(err, res) {
    if(err) return console.error(err);
    console.log('got response!');
});

req.on('error', function(err) {
    console.error('error!', err);
});

Another piece of valuable information: I'm not sure how it fits in with fibers, but in general, you should never throw in nodejs asynchronous code. It rarely works the way you want. Instead, use the standard practice of passing any error as the first parameter to the next callback, and handle the error where it makes sense (usually, high up in the call chain where you can do something sensible with it).

share|improve this answer
    
Moving my end statement didn't work but I got it to work using request - I agree this library adds a lot to the basic http package! – ControlAltDel Apr 20 '12 at 17:40

You can scrape the page for the error code.

share|improve this answer
    
It never even makes it to the page. It shoots me out with getaddrinfo ENOENT – ControlAltDel Apr 20 '12 at 15:30

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.