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It's easy enough to make a simple sieve:

for (int i=2; i<=N; i++){
    if (sieve[i]==0){
        cout << i << " is prime" << endl;
        for (int j = i; j<=N; j+=i){
            sieve[j]=1;
        }
    }
    cout << i << " has " << sieve[i] << " distinct prime factors\n";
}

But what about when N is very large and I can't hold that kind of array in memory? I've looked up segmented sieve approaches and they seem to involve finding primes up until sqrt(N) but I don't understand how it works. What if N is very large (say 10^18)?

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You mentioned in your answer to larsmans that you are really interested in finding the number of prime factors for large N. In that case, and assuming N < 10^18, you're much better off to factor N than to sieve all the numbers up to N. –  user448810 Apr 20 '12 at 16:20
1  
For each k up to N, not just N –  John Smith Apr 20 '12 at 16:24
    
What's k? What's k? –  user448810 Apr 20 '12 at 16:32
    
2<=k<=N in general. –  John Smith Apr 20 '12 at 16:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 23 down vote accepted

The basic idea of a segmented sieve is to choose the sieving primes less than the square root of n, choose a reasonably large segment size that nevertheless fits in memory, and then sieve each of the segments in turn, starting with the smallest. At the first segment, the smallest multiple of each sieving prime that is within the segment is calculated, then multiples of the sieving prime are marked as composite in the normal way; when all the sieving primes have been used, the remaining unmarked numbers in the segment are prime. Then, for the next segment, for each sieving prime you already know the first multiple in the current segment (it was the multiple that ended the sieving for that prime in the prior segment), so you sieve on each sieving prime, and so on until you are finished.

The size of n doesn't matter, except that a larger n will take longer to sieve than a smaller n; the size that matters is the size of the segment, which should be as large as convenient (say, the size of the primary memory cache on the machine).

You can see a simple implementation of a segmented sieve here. Note that a segmented sieve will be very much faster than O'Neill's priority-queue sieve mentioned in another answer; if you're interested, there's an implementation here.

EDIT: I wrote this for a different purpose, but I'll show it here because it might be useful:

Though the Sieve of Eratosthenes is very fast, it requires O(n) space. That can be reduced to O(sqrt(n)) for the sieving primes plus O(1) for the bitarray by performing the sieving in successive segments. At the first segment, the smallest multiple of each sieving prime that is within the segment is calculated, then multiples of the sieving prime are marked composite in the normal way; when all the sieving primes have been used, the remaining unmarked numbers in the segment are prime. Then, for the next segment, the smallest multiple of each sieving prime is the multiple that ended the sieving in the prior segment, and so the sieving continues until finished.

Consider the example of sieve from 100 to 200 in segments of 20. The five sieving primes are 3, 5, 7, 11 and 13. In the first segment from 100 to 120, the bitarray has ten slots, with slot 0 corresponding to 101, slot k corresponding to 100+2k+1, and slot 9 corresponding to 119. The smallest multiple of 3 in the segment is 105, corresponding to slot 2; slots 2+3=5 and 5+3=8 are also multiples of 3. The smallest multiple of 5 is 105 at slot 2, and slot 2+5=7 is also a multiple of 5. The smallest multiple of 7 is 105 at slot 2, and slot 2+7=9 is also a multiple of 7. And so on.

Function primesRange takes arguments lo, hi and delta; lo and hi must be even, with lo < hi, and lo must be greater than sqrt(hi). The segment size is twice delta. Ps is a linked list containing the sieving primes less than sqrt(hi), with 2 removed since even numbers are ignored. Qs is a linked list containing the offest into the sieve bitarray of the smallest multiple in the current segment of the corresponding sieving prime. After each segment, lo advances by twice delta, so the number corresponding to an index i of the sieve bitarray is lo + 2i + 1.

function primesRange(lo, hi, delta)
    function qInit(p)
        return (-1/2 * (lo + p + 1)) % p
    function qReset(p, q)
        return (q - delta) % p
    sieve := makeArray(0..delta-1)
    ps := tail(primes(sqrt(hi)))
    qs := map(qInit, ps)
    while lo < hi
        for i from 0 to delta-1
            sieve[i] := True
        for p,q in ps,qs
            for i from q to delta step p
                sieve[i] := False
        qs := map(qReset, ps, qs)
        for i,t from 0,lo+1 to delta-1,hi step 1,2
            if sieve[i]
                output t
        lo := lo + 2 * delta

When called as primes(100, 200, 10), the sieving primes ps are [3, 5, 7, 11, 13]; qs is initially [2, 2, 2, 10, 8] corresponding to smallest multiples 105, 105, 105, 121 and 117, and is reset for the second segment to [1, 2, 6, 0, 11] corresponding to smallest multiples 123, 125, 133, 121 and 143.

You can see this program in action at http://ideone.com/iHYr1f. And in addition to the links shown above, if you are interested in programming with prime numbers I modestly recommend this essay at my blog.

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1  
You asked for examples. The referenced site shows precisely how to sieve the range 100 to 200 in five segments, including how to choose the sieving primes and how to reset the sieving primes for each segment. Did you work out the example for yourself, by hand? What is it that you still don't understand? –  user448810 Apr 20 '12 at 16:40
3  
Looking at the example. The sieving primes less than the square root of 200 are 3, 5, 7, 11 and 13. Let's consider the first segment, which has the ten values {101 103 105 107 109 111 113 115 117 119}. The smallest multiple of 3 in the segment is 105, so strike 105 and each third number after: 111, 117. The smallest multiple of 5 in the segment is 105, so strike 105 and the fifth number after: 115. The smallest multiple of 7 in the segment is 105, so strike 105 and the seventh number after: 119. There is no multiple of 11 in the segment, so there is nothing to do. The smallest multiple of 13 –  user448810 Apr 20 '12 at 16:58
2  
in the segment is 117, so strike it. The numbers that are left {101 103 107 109 113} are prime. For the second segment {121 123 125 127 129 131 133 135 137 139} the smallest multiples of each prime are 123, 125, 133 (beyond the segment), 121 and 143 (beyond the segment), which can all be calculated by counting the next multiple of the sieving prime after the end of the first segment. Does that help? –  user448810 Apr 20 '12 at 17:02
1  
+1 for an excellent description of segmented sieves and the programmingpraxis link. –  NealB Apr 20 '12 at 17:20
1  
It's not the first number greater than L divisible by P, but the first offset into the sieve. Consider a window of length P sliding along the number line; at some point one endpoint will be greater than L while the other is less than or equal to L. The distance from the left endpoint to L is L%P, and the remaining -L%P above L is the offset where we want to start sieving. Add 1 and divide by 2 because our sieve has only odd numbers, and rearrange terms to move the mod P operation outside the parentheses. –  user448810 Sep 5 '13 at 15:55

There's a version of the Sieve based on priority queues that yields as many primes as you request, rather than all of them up to an upper bound. It's discussed in the classic paper "The Genuine Sieve of Eratosthenes" and googling for "sieve of eratosthenes priority queue" turns up quite a few implementations in various programming languages.

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1  
I've come across the implementations but the problem is that I don't understand them. Those papers are always quite dense. I'm mainly looking for examples because I think those are easiest to work with and understand. Technically I am using the sieve to acquire # of unique prime factors per value k for large N. –  John Smith Apr 20 '12 at 16:10
    
An incremental sieve as used by Melissa O'Neill in the linked paper is quite slow as compared to an array-based sieve, and worse, has asymptotic computational complexity that grows by considerable faster than linearly with range, so may not be suitable for this problem. As to the "no upper bound necessary" qualification, a page segmented sieve also doesn't have to have a specified upper bound if the base primes less than the square root of the current range) are implemented as a "expandable array" or as a form of list. –  GordonBGood Apr 17 at 4:17

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