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I know there is tidy php class by default already, what about if I want to create my own custom tidy class and I want to name that class as tidy too?

class tidy
{
    public function html()
    {
        return 'local';
    }
}

$tidy = new tidy();
echo $tidy->html();

error,

Fatal error: Cannot redeclare class tidy in C:\wamp\www\test\2012\php\dom_tidy_html_8.php on line 11

How can I not to conflict with PHP's default tidy?

Is it possible?

EDIT:

I tested it with namespace and it works but I am not whether this is a good practice or not...? I haven't done anything with namespace before so I am not sure whether it is safe or not...

namespace tidy;

class tidy
{
    public function html()
    {
        return 'local';
    }
}

$tidy = new tidy();
echo $tidy->html();

Would it cause any problem if I want to use the PHP default tidy occasionally?

share|improve this question
    
Namespaces –  Tim Cooper Apr 20 '12 at 15:53
    
Thanks but how to use namespace to archive that? I haven't tried anything with namespace yet... –  tealou Apr 20 '12 at 15:54
1  
@lauthiamkok Namespaces are designed to solve you issue, please read up on them here : php.net/manual/en/language.namespaces.rationale.php. –  ilanco Apr 21 '12 at 11:02
1  
thanks, ilanco. I am now using namespace :-) thanks. –  tealou Apr 22 '12 at 15:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you want to build on top of tidy then just extend the tidy class and call is myTidy.

class myTidy extends tidy
{
    public function html()
    {
        return 'local';
    }
}

$tidy = new myTidy();
echo $tidy->html();

If you want to create your own implementation from scratch try to remove the tidy module and then create the tidy class.

If you are using PHP >= 5.3.0 you can also create your own tidy class in a Namespace :

namespace My\Tidy;

class tidy
{
    public function html()
    {
        return 'local';
    }
}

$tidy = new tidy();
echo $tidy->html();
share|improve this answer
    
thanks. it seems that give it a different name is the only option. –  tealou Apr 20 '12 at 15:57
    
It seems I can make it with namespace. Please see my edit above. Thanks. –  tealou Apr 20 '12 at 16:02
    
thanks for the edit. so I think I am safe with namespace... –  tealou Apr 20 '12 at 16:04

Just name it something different:

class my_tidy
{
    public function html()
    {
        return 'local';
    }
}

$tidy = new my_tidy();
echo $tidy->html();
share|improve this answer
    
thanks. it seems that give it a different name is the only option... –  tealou Apr 20 '12 at 15:56
    
It seems I can make it with namespace. Please see my edit above. Thanks. –  tealou Apr 20 '12 at 16:03

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