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While working through the MVC 2 NerdDinner tutorial I see that some business logic (required fields, maximum lengths, etc.) can be added to individual properties on the model.

How do you add more complex validation rules? For example, requiring exactly one of two properties to be populated?

Example [QuantumMechanics/Models/Particle.cs]:

namespace QuantumMechanics.Models
{
   [MetadataType(typeof(Particle_Validation))]
   public partial class Particle {
   }
   public class Particle_Validation
   {
       // Mass is required; easy enough.
       [Required(ErrorMessage="Mass is required.")]
       public Mass double {get; set; }

       // How do I require exactly one or the other?
       public Position double {get; set; }
       public Momentum double {get; set; }
   }
}
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3 Answers 3

In MVC2 you would perform checks once the values have been posted to the controller.

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Add(Particle particleToAdd)
{
    ValidateModel(particleToAdd);

    if(ModelState.IsValid)
    {
        // Add particle
        return RedirectToAction(...) // etc
    }

    // Return the view with our errors
    return View(particleToAdd);
}

// This validate method can be invoked from your Add and Edit actions
private void ValidateModel(Particle particleToAddOrUpdate)
{
    if(particleToAddOrUpdate.Position == null && particleToAddOrUpdate.Momentum == null)
    {
        ModelState.AddModelError("", "You must supply a value for either Position or Momentum");
    }
}

You could add the error to one of the properties if you liked (Position or Momentum) but I've just added it to the generic error list which will appear in your validation summary.

<%: Html.ValidationSummary() %>

In MVC3 there is an interface IValidateObject which abstracts this problem a bit. It allows you to perform checks like you've specified per class i.e. Your particle object could check its own properties on binding and you wouldn't have to write your checks within your Add method.

Here's an example of its usage.

Unfortunately there is nothing out of the box in MVC2 that allows you to validate multiple properties for a class on binding like the IValidateObject interface in MVC3. You just need to make sure you call your additional Validate method when your Add or Edit actions are invoked.

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Thank you for the quick reply. This is a workable approach, but it only applies to the Add method of the controller. Shouldn't there be a way to enforce it at the model level, so it can be invoked by all controller methods, like Edit too? –  AggieEngineer2k Apr 20 '12 at 20:47
    
I've updated my answer which shows some basic re-use of the additional validation you require. Unfortunately I don't think there's a lot more you can do in MVC2 out of the box which is why MVC3 added the IValidateObject interface. –  David Spence Apr 20 '12 at 21:52

It sounds like what you're aiming for is a "conditional required" rule, i.e. a property that is marked as required based upon the value of another property. This isn't possible with just the ValidationAttribute, because the scope of that attribute is confined to just the property it decorates. You need to implement a matched DataAnnotationsModelValidator to have a wider scope (and a ModelClientValidationRule with associated client-side javascript if you want it to also validate client-side).

So, your ConditionalRequiredAttribute would look something like:

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Property | AttributeTargets.Field, AllowMultiple = true)]
public class ConditionalRequiredAttribute : ValidationAttribute
{
    public ConditionalRequiredAttribute(string triggerProperty, object triggerValue)
    {
        TriggerProperty = triggerProperty;
        TriggerValue = triggerValue;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Checks that the value of the decorated member is not null/empty if the TriggerProperty's value is equal to TriggerValue.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="value">The data field value to validate.</param>
    /// <returns>true if validation is successful; otherwise, false.</returns>
    public override bool IsValid(object value)
    {
        if (value == null)
            return false;

        if (value is double)
        {
            return !((double)value).Equals(0);
        }

        string s = value as string;
        if (s != null)
            return s.Length > 0;

        return true;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// The name of the property whose value will be checked to trigger the required field
    /// </summary>
    public string TriggerProperty { get; set; }

    /// <summary>
    /// The expected value of the trigger property that will trigger the required field
    /// </summary>
    public object TriggerValue { get; set; }
}

This is actually pretty much identical to the standard Required attribute - the "special sauce" is actually the validator, which you use to only call the IsValid method in certain circumstances (i.e. TriggerProperty.Value == TriggerValue). The Validator would look like:

 public class ConditionalRequiredValidator : DataAnnotationsModelValidator<ConditionalRequiredAttribute>
{
    public ConditionalRequiredValidator(ModelMetadata metadata, ControllerContext context,
                                        ConditionalRequiredAttribute attribute)
        : base(metadata, context, attribute)
    {

    }


    /// <summary>
    /// Override the default validate method to only execute if the TriggerProperty's value is equal to TriggerValue
    /// </summary>
    public override IEnumerable<ModelValidationResult> Validate(object container)
    {
        // Does the specified property exist in the metadata?
        PropertyInfo triggerProperty = Metadata.ContainerType.GetProperty(Attribute.TriggerProperty);
        if (triggerProperty != null)
        {
            object actualValue = triggerProperty.GetValue(container, null);
            if (actualValue != null)
            {
                if (Attribute.TriggerValue.Equals(actualValue))
                {
                    // Run IsValid for the property if the actual value matches the expected value
                    foreach (ModelValidationResult result in base.Validate(container))
                    {
                        yield return result;
                    }

                }
            }
        }
    }
}

Finally, you need to register the ConditionalRequiredValidator with the provider to make sure the framework prefers it when a ConditionalRequiredAttribute is used. To do this, add the following line the Application_Start() method of Global.asax.cs:

DataAnnotationsModelValidatorProvider.RegisterAdapter(typeof(ConditionalRequiredAttribute), typeof(ConditionalRequiredValidator));

You then decorate the members of the particle class (or indeed any other class) like so:

public class Particle
{
    // Mass is required; easy enough.
    [Required(ErrorMessage="Mass is required.")]
    public double Mass  { get; set; }

    [ConditionalRequired("Momentum", 0D, ErrorMessage = "Position must be set if Momentum is not.")]
    public double Position { get; set; }

    [ConditionalRequired("Position", 0D, ErrorMessage = "Momentum must be set if Position is not.")]
    public double Momentum { get; set; }
}

Voila, you should now be able to conditionally validate one field based on the value of another.

On a sidenote, you can abstract this Conditional logic into a helper class and create a series of "conditional" validators, ConditionalRequired, ConditionalRange etc etc...

Note 2: While it's perhaps more complex / "more code" than your own solution (which was posted while I was still putting this reply together - doh!) this does have the benefit of being very reusable. To add the same functionality to future viewmodels you just need to decorate your properties with the ConditionalRequired attribute...

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up vote -1 down vote accepted

Thought I'd post the solution I went with. Like Spencerooni said, there is not an elegant mechanism to add complex validation to the model itself, but this seems to work. It leverages the DefaultModelBinder interface's OnModelUpdated method override to invalidate the underlying model anytime it is updated.

Note that DataAnnotations on a Model's properties are only invoked when a bound field is posted back, which means validation will pass on a form without a field for Mass at all.

Global.asax

ModelBinders.Binders[typeof(Particle)] = new ParticleModelBinder();

Models/ParticleModelBinder.cs

public class ParticleModelBinder : DefaultModelBinder
{
    protected override void OnModelUpdated(ControllerContext controllerContext, ModelBindingContext bindingContext)
    {
        base.OnModelUpdated(controllerContext, bindingContext);

        var particle = (Particle)bindingContext.Model;

        if (<Test for business rule violation here>)
        {
            var modelState = bindingContext.ModelState;
            // Message to appear in validation summary.
            modelState.AddModelError("","Please enter position OR momentum.");
            // Messages also appear in summary, but highlight the bound controls too.
            modelState.AddModelError(bindingContext.ModelName + ".Position",
                "Please enter position (or momemtum).");
            modelState.AddModelError(bindingContext.ModelName + ".Momentum",
                "Please enter momentum (or position).");
        }
    }
}
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