Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

i have a 2D array of size 5428x5428 size.and it is a symmetric array. but while compiling it gives me an error saying that array size too large. can anyone provide me a way?

share|improve this question
1  
Would be much better if you share your code (or simpler version of it) and provide the error that compiler gives you. –  LihO Apr 20 '12 at 16:19
    
well its something like this.. void main() { double array[5428][5428]; ..... } when i compile this it gives me error at that declaration line saying that array size is too large. –  tina Apr 20 '12 at 16:31
    
It depends on your pc memory size. –  jellyfication Apr 20 '12 at 16:39

3 Answers 3

This array is to large for program stack memory - thats your error.

int main()
{
    double arr[5428][5428]; // 8bytes*5428*5428 = 224MB

    // ...
    // use arr[y][x]
    // ...

    // no memory freeing needed
}

Use dynamic array allocation:

int main()
{
    int i;
    double ** arr;

    arr = (double**)malloc(sizeof(double*)*5428);
    for (i = 0; i < 5428; i++)
        arr[i] = (double*)malloc(sizeof(double)*5428);

    // ...
    // use arr[y][x]
    // ...

    for (i = 0; i < 5428; i++)
        free(arr[i]);
    free(arr);
}

Or allocate plain array of size MxN and use ptr[y*width+x]

int main()
{
    double * arr;
    arr = (double*)malloc(sizeof(double)*5428*5428);

    // ...
    // use arr[y*5428 + x]
    // ...

    free(arr);
}

Or use combined method:

int main()
{
    int i;
    double * arr[5428];  // sizeof(double*)*5428 = 20Kb of stack for x86
    for(i = 0; i < 5428; i++)
        arr[i] = (double)malloc(sizeof(double)*5428);

    // ...
    // use arr[y][x]
    // ...

    for(i = 0; i < 5428; i++)
        free(arr[i]);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
You could also do double (*arr)[5248] = malloc (sizeof *arr * 5248); -- the memory will be allocated as a single contiguous block, and you can index it as a normal 2D array. –  John Bode Apr 20 '12 at 17:51
    
Thanks, i'll add this case in answer, ok? –  k06a Apr 20 '12 at 18:28
    
But there is segmentation fault: codepad.org/3dGXAlO6 –  k06a Apr 20 '12 at 18:35
    
@JohnBode - but this would only work if you have a single contiguous 5k*5k block of memory available. By doing an array of lines you handle memory fragmentation. Although 64bit and buy lots of RAM helps! –  Martin Beckett Apr 20 '12 at 18:39

When arrays get large, there are a number of solutions. The one that is good for you depends heavily on what you are actually doing.

I'll list a few to get you thinking:

  1. Buy more memory.

  2. Move your array from the stack to the heap.

    The stack has tighter size limitations than the heap.

  3. Simulate portions of the array (you say yours is symmetric, so just under 1/2 of the data is redundant).

    In your case, the array is symmetric, so instead of using an array, use a "simulated array"

    int getArray(array, col, row);
    void setArray(array, col, row, value);

    where array is a data structure tha only holds the lower left half and the diagonal. The getArray(..) then determines if the column is greater than the row, and if it is, it returns (note the reversed entries getArray(array, row, col); This leverages the symmetric property of the array without the need to actually hold both symmetric sides.

  4. Simulate the array using a list (or tree or hash table) of "only the value holding items"

    This works very well for sparse arrays, as you no longer need to allocate memory to hold large numbers of zero (or empty) values. In the event that someone "looks up" a non-set value, your code "discovers" no value set for that entry, and then returns the "zero" or empty value without it actually being stored in your array.

Again without more details, it is hard to know what kind of solution is the best approach.

share|improve this answer

When you create local variables, they go on the stack, which is of limited size. You're blowing through that limit.

You want your array to go on the heap, which is all the virtual memory your system has, i.e. gigs and gigs on a modern system. There are two ways to manage that. One is to dynamically allocate the array as in k06a's answer; use malloc() or your platform-specific allocator function (e.g. GlobalAlloc() on Windows) . The second is to declare the array as a global or module static variable, outside of any function.

Using a global or static has the disadvantage that this memory will be allocated for the entire lifetime of your program. Also, pretty much everybody hates globals on principle. On the other hand, you can use the two-dimensional array syntax, "array[x][y]" and the like, to access array elements... easier than doing array[x + y * width], plus you don't have to remember whether you're supposed to be doing "x + y * width" or "x * height + y" .

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.