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I am working through an assignment and have run into a few snags.

My program prints output to the screen, (not how I need it yet) but only prints the first entry to the file. Below is a snippet of the code. The file appears to be reading in the data from the input file, but the loop does not output to the file past the first entry.

Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in);    //Scanner object to read input from the file
System.out.println("Enter filename to read ");  //file name prompt  
String inputFileName = in.nextLine();                //line input reads next line

/*
 * TODO 2) Use an unbuffered file input stream to open listings.txt file
 * and read in property listings.
 */
Scanner reader = null;
try {
    reader = new Scanner(new File(inputFileName));
} catch (FileNotFoundException e) {

    System.out.println("Try Again");   //error window if name is null
    JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, "You must enter a filename", "File input error", JOptionPane.ERROR_MESSAGE);
    return;

}

PrintWriter out = new PrintWriter("agentreport.txt"); //This method prints out the file readfile.txt a word at a time
while (reader.hasNextLine()) {                      //It needs to output to the text file. Currently a file is created, but it is empty?
    Scanner s2 = new Scanner(reader.next());

    @SuppressWarnings("unused")
    boolean b;
    while (b = s2.hasNext()) {
        String output = s2.next();
        String output2 = output.toUpperCase(); //converts output to upper case
        System.out.println(output2);
        out.print(output2);  //only printing the first entry to the agentsreport.txt file. Not stepping thru the file for some reason? 
   }
share|improve this question
1  
Your code was OK except that you failed to indent the first line of it - I fixed it for you :-) (and that you seem to miss a closing brace :-) Yes, this is the preferred way to post code here. –  Péter Török Apr 20 '12 at 16:48
1  
Note also that you could omit the variable b, together with @SuppressWarnings, by having simply while (s2.hasNext()). –  Péter Török Apr 20 '12 at 16:52

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

One thing that immediately jumps out is that you aren't handling your resources properly.

Any time you use an IO resource such as a reader/database connection/etc., you should always close it using a finally block, using this sort of pattern:

Reader reader = /* construct it however */
try {
    /* do something with the reader */
}
finally {
    reader.close();
}

If you don't do this, there's no guarantee that the reader will actually be closed, and your application will leak file descriptors/connection pool connections/etc., until eventually it won't be able to get hold of any more and your app crashes. (This won't always have fatal consequences, but it's such a straightforward pattern you should use it every time until it becomes automatic).

In this case, you aren't closing your writer at all, which means that it's not guaranteed that it ever actually flushes its output to the file. It would be perfectly in accordance with the Writer interface for it to write everything or nothing - without the flush, you have no guarantees. Note that closing the writer will automatically call flush, so that's the best bet once you're done with it.

So the latter part of your code should look like:

PrintWriter out = new PrintWriter("agentreport.txt");
try {
    // Existing code here
}
finally {
    // This closes the file and frees the descriptor, but also flushes the buffers
    out.close();
}

Also, how are you handling the IOExceptions that can be thrown by the reading and writing? Are you catching them and swallowing them somewhere? If so, it's possible that your code is throwing an exception telling you exactly why it can't write, and you're just ignoring it and then looking puzzled.

Not to put too fine a point on it, error handling is probably the most significant part of good software development. It's not too hard to write software that works when everything's fine; the most challenging part is handling things well when you run out of space on the hard drive, or the network is temporarily down, etc.

In this case the most pragmatic approach would be to just let the exception be thrown out of the top of your main method. In this case your application will "crash", and you'll get a stacktrace + error message on the console, which will make it immediately clear that something went wrong, and give you a very good idea of what it was.

share|improve this answer

Even if you are using automatic flushing, which you aren't in this case, the PrintWriter object would output anything in its internal buffer unless you do one of two things:

1) Use the println(), printf(), or format() to methods

2) Make a call to the flush() method every time you print, this way all of the data in the internal buffer gets written out.

Note: The print() method does not cause the PrintWriter object to flush() its buffer.

try adding a call to flush() after you call print()

Example of split()

PrintWriter out = new PrintWriter("agentreport.txt"); 
while (reader.hasNextLine()) {                    
    String words = reader.nextLine().split();

    @SuppressWarnings("unused")
    boolean b;
    for(String word : words) {
        String output = word ;
        String output2 = output.toUpperCase(); //converts output to upper case
        System.out.println(output2);
        out.print(output2);  
   }
share|improve this answer
    
I added out.flush(); to line 69 and I still only get the first line of my read text file to the output file. –  1RacerTn Apr 20 '12 at 21:13
    
There must be some error with how you are using the scanner objects then. You read a line, then from that line you read a single token, so your inner loop will only every go around once. What you should do is read a line, then split the line on whitespace using the String.split() method, and for each String returned from String.split() do something with it. Ill post an example. –  Hunter McMillen Apr 20 '12 at 21:21

try

out.println(output2);

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/io/PrintWriter.html

also I'd use a var other than "out" as when system.out is imported to use the shortcode 'out.println()', this could cause variable confusion

edit: good point @Hunter McMillen, changed to println as append is for a CharSequence.

share|improve this answer
    
FWIW I disagree with your caveat - I've never seen someone import System.out;, and I'd argue it's quite common to call input and output streams in and out respectively, particularly in quite straightforward IO code like this. It's always good to be descriptive of course, but I don't think the name clash you mention is a real danger. –  Andrzej Doyle Apr 20 '12 at 16:51
    
Can a String object be implicitly converted to a CharSequence during the call to append? –  Hunter McMillen Apr 20 '12 at 16:53
try ( 
   Scanner reader = new Scanner(new File(inputFileName));
   PrintWriter writer = new PrintWriter(new FileOutputStream("agentreport.txt"), true);
) {

   while (reader.hasNextLine()) {                     
      String output = reader.nextLine().toUpperCase();
      System.out.println(output);
      writer.println(output); 
   }
} catch (FileNotFoundException e) {

   System.out.println("Try Again");   //error window if name is null
   JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, "You must enter a filename", "File input error", JOptionPane.ERROR_MESSAGE);

}
share|improve this answer

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