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I am playing around with SQL a little just so I am not completely ignorant about it if I am ever asked in a job interview. My friend was recently asked the following question at an interview and he couldn't get it and I asked somebody at work who knows SQL decently and he didn't know. Can you guys answer this problem for me and then explain how it works? Please?

*The problem*

Database normalization (or lack of normalization) often presents a challenge for developers.

Consider a database table of employees that contains three fields:

EmployeeID
EmployeeName
EmailAddresses

Every employee, identified by a unique EmployeeID, may have one or more comma-separated, @rockauto.com email address(es) in the EmailAddresses field.

The database table is defined below:

CREATE TABLE Employees
(
  EmployeeID int UNSIGNED NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY,
  EmployeeName varchar(50) NOT NULL,
  EmailAddresses varchar(40) NOT NULL ,
  PRIMARY KEY(EmployeeID)
);

For testing purposes, here is some sample data:

INSERT INTO Employees (EmployeeID, EmployeeName, EmailAddresses) VALUES
('1', 'Bill', 'bill@companyx.com'),
('2', 'Fred', 'fred@companyx.com,freddie@companyx.com'),
('3', 'Fred', 'fredsmith@companyx.com'),
('4', 'Joe', 'joe@companyx.com,joe_smith@companyx.com');

Your task is to write a single MySQL SELECT query that will show the following output for the sample data above:

Employee    EmailAddress
Bill    bill@companyx.com
Fred (2)    fred@companyx.com
Fred (2)    freddie@companyx.com
Fred (3)    fredsmith@companyx.com
Joe     joe@companyx.com
Joe     joe_smith@companyx.com

Please take note that because there is more than one person with the same name (in this case, "Fred"), the EmployeeID is included in parenthesis.

Your query is required to written in MySQL version 5.1.41 compatible syntax. You should assume that the ordering is accomplished using standard database ascending ordering: "ORDER BY EmployeeID ASC"

For this problem, you need to submit a single SQL SELECT query. Your query should be able to process a table of 1000 records in a reasonable amount of time.

share|improve this question
9  
Just my opinion... this is a terrible interview question. –  bobwienholt Apr 20 '12 at 16:50
    
are we allowed to use php to parse the select statement, or does the query have to pull directly in that format –  squarephoenix Apr 20 '12 at 16:53
2  
a better question would be how to normalize this database structure ^^ –  Andreas Linden Apr 20 '12 at 16:53
1  
The thing I'm struggling with is taking a row and splitting up a column value to make it into multiple rows. There is no straightforward way to do that. –  bobwienholt Apr 20 '12 at 17:13
1  
Step 1, find who ever caused this issue and hurt them. –  Tony Hopkinson Apr 20 '12 at 17:15

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

only if you have less than 10000 emails.... is that acceptable?

select 
       if(t1.c > 1, concat(e.employeename, ' (', e.employeeid, ')'), e.employeename) as Employee,
       replace(substring(substring_index(e.EmailAddresses, ',', n.row), length(substring_index(e.EmailAddresses, ',', n.row - 1)) + 1), ',', '') EmailAddress 
from 
       (select employeename, count(*) as c from Employees group by employeename) as t1, 
       (select EmployeeID, length(EmailAddresses) - length(replace(EmailAddresses,',','')) + 1 as emails from Employees) as t2,
       (SELECT @row := @row + 1 as row FROM 
       (select 0 union all select 1 union all select 3 union all select 4 union all select 5 union all select 6 union all select 6 union all select 7 union all select 8 union all select 9) x,
       (select 0 union all select 1 union all select 3 union all select 4 union all select 5 union all select 6 union all select 6 union all select 7 union all select 8 union all select 9) x2, 
       (select 0 union all select 1 union all select 3 union all select 4 union all select 5 union all select 6 union all select 6 union all select 7 union all select 8 union all select 9) x3, 
       (select 0 union all select 1 union all select 3 union all select 4 union all select 5 union all select 6 union all select 6 union all select 7 union all select 8 union all select 9) x4, 
       (SELECT @row:=0) as ff) as n,
       Employees e
where 
      e.employeename = t1.employeename and
      e.employeeid = t2.employeeid and
      n.row <= t2.emails
order by e.employeeid;

EDIT:

With less useless numbers generated:

select 
       if(t1.c > 1, concat(e.EmployeeName, ' (', e.EmployeeID, ')'), e.EmployeeName) as Employee,
       replace(substring(substring_index(e.EmailAddresses, ',', n.row), length(substring_index(e.EmailAddresses, ',', n.row - 1)) + 1), ',', '') as EmailAddress 
from 
       (select EmployeeName, count(*) as c from Employees group by EmployeeName) as t1, 
       (select EmployeeID, length(EmailAddresses) - length(replace(EmailAddresses,',','')) + 1 as emails from Employees) as t2,
       (select `1` as row from (select 1 union all select 2 union all select 3 union all select 4) x) as n,
       Employees e
where 
      e.EmployeeName = t1.EmployeeName and
      e.EmployeeID = t2.EmployeeID and
      n.row <= t2.emails
order by e.EmployeeID;

And what did we learn? Poor database design results awful queries. And you can do stuff with SQL, that are probably supported only because people do poor database designs... :)

share|improve this answer
    
the email field is only 40characters long so there won't event fit 10 in there –  Jens Schauder Apr 20 '12 at 18:14
    
Good point... number generation could be simplified significantly. Apparently there isn't a way to generate parametrized number of rows in MySQL. –  Toni Apr 20 '12 at 18:25

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