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While writing an optimized ftol function I found some very odd behaviour in GCC 4.6.1. Let me show you the code first (for clarity I marked the differences):

fast_trunc_one, C:

int fast_trunc_one(int i) {
    int mantissa, exponent, sign, r;

    mantissa = (i & 0x07fffff) | 0x800000;
    exponent = 150 - ((i >> 23) & 0xff);
    sign = i & 0x80000000;

    if (exponent < 0) {
        r = mantissa << -exponent;                       /* diff */
    } else {
        r = mantissa >> exponent;                        /* diff */
    }

    return (r ^ -sign) + sign;                           /* diff */
}

fast_trunc_two, C:

int fast_trunc_two(int i) {
    int mantissa, exponent, sign, r;

    mantissa = (i & 0x07fffff) | 0x800000;
    exponent = 150 - ((i >> 23) & 0xff);
    sign = i & 0x80000000;

    if (exponent < 0) {
        r = (mantissa << -exponent) ^ -sign;             /* diff */
    } else {
        r = (mantissa >> exponent) ^ -sign;              /* diff */
    }

    return r + sign;                                     /* diff */
}

Seems the same right? Well GCC disagrees. After compiling with gcc -O3 -S -Wall -o test.s test.c this is the assembly output:

fast_trunc_one, generated:

_fast_trunc_one:
LFB0:
    .cfi_startproc
    movl    4(%esp), %eax
    movl    $150, %ecx
    movl    %eax, %edx
    andl    $8388607, %edx
    sarl    $23, %eax
    orl $8388608, %edx
    andl    $255, %eax
    subl    %eax, %ecx
    movl    %edx, %eax
    sarl    %cl, %eax
    testl   %ecx, %ecx
    js  L5
    rep
    ret
    .p2align 4,,7
L5:
    negl    %ecx
    movl    %edx, %eax
    sall    %cl, %eax
    ret
    .cfi_endproc

fast_trunc_two, generated:

_fast_trunc_two:
LFB1:
    .cfi_startproc
    pushl   %ebx
    .cfi_def_cfa_offset 8
    .cfi_offset 3, -8
    movl    8(%esp), %eax
    movl    $150, %ecx
    movl    %eax, %ebx
    movl    %eax, %edx
    sarl    $23, %ebx
    andl    $8388607, %edx
    andl    $255, %ebx
    orl $8388608, %edx
    andl    $-2147483648, %eax
    subl    %ebx, %ecx
    js  L9
    sarl    %cl, %edx
    movl    %eax, %ecx
    negl    %ecx
    xorl    %ecx, %edx
    addl    %edx, %eax
    popl    %ebx
    .cfi_remember_state
    .cfi_def_cfa_offset 4
    .cfi_restore 3
    ret
    .p2align 4,,7
L9:
    .cfi_restore_state
    negl    %ecx
    sall    %cl, %edx
    movl    %eax, %ecx
    negl    %ecx
    xorl    %ecx, %edx
    addl    %edx, %eax
    popl    %ebx
    .cfi_restore 3
    .cfi_def_cfa_offset 4
    ret
    .cfi_endproc

That's an extreme difference. This actually shows up on the profile too, fast_trunc_one is around 30% faster than fast_trunc_two. Now my question: what is causing this?

share|improve this question
1  
For testing purposes I created a gist here where you can easily copy/paste the source and see if you can reproduce the bug on other systems/versions of GCC. –  nightcracker Apr 20 '12 at 17:16
10  
Put the test cases in a directory of their own. Compile them with -S -O3 -da -fdump-tree-all. This will create many snapshots of the intermediate representation. Walk through them (they're numbered) side by side and you should be able to find the missing optimization in the first case. –  Zack Apr 20 '12 at 17:21
1  
Suggestion two: change all int to unsigned int and see if the difference vanishes. –  Zack Apr 20 '12 at 17:22
5  
The two functions seem to be doing slightly different math. While the results might be the same, the expression (r + shifted) ^ sign is not the same as r + (shifted ^ sign). I guess that's confusing the optimizer? FWIW, MSVC 2010 (16.00.40219.01) produces listings that are almost identical to each other: gist.github.com/2430454 –  DCoder Apr 20 '12 at 17:26
1  
@DCoder: Oh damn! I didn't spot that. It isn't the explanation for the difference though. Let me update the question with a new version where this is ruled out. –  nightcracker Apr 20 '12 at 17:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 217 down vote accepted

Updated to sync with the OP's edit

By tinkering with the code, I've managed to see how GCC optimizes the first case.

Before we can understand why they are so different, first we must understand how GCC optimizes fast_trunc_one().

Believe it or not, fast_trunc_one() is being optimized to this:

int fast_trunc_one(int i) {
    int mantissa, exponent;

    mantissa = (i & 0x07fffff) | 0x800000;
    exponent = 150 - ((i >> 23) & 0xff);

    if (exponent < 0) {
        return (mantissa << -exponent);             /* diff */
    } else {
        return (mantissa >> exponent);              /* diff */
    }
}

This produces the exact same assembly as the original fast_trunc_one() - register names and everything.

Notice that there are no xors in the assembly for fast_trunc_one(). That's what gave it away for me.


How so?


Step 1: sign = -sign

First, let's take a look at the sign variable. Since sign = i & 0x80000000;, there are only two possible values that sign can take:

  • sign = 0
  • sign = 0x80000000

Now recognize that in both cases, sign == -sign. Therefore, when I change the original code to this:

int fast_trunc_one(int i) {
    int mantissa, exponent, sign, r;

    mantissa = (i & 0x07fffff) | 0x800000;
    exponent = 150 - ((i >> 23) & 0xff);
    sign = i & 0x80000000;

    if (exponent < 0) {
        r = mantissa << -exponent;
    } else {
        r = mantissa >> exponent;
    }

    return (r ^ sign) + sign;
}

It produces the exact same assembly as the original fast_trunc_one(). I'll spare you the assembly, but it is identical - register names and all.


Step 2: Mathematical reduction: x + (y ^ x) = y

sign can only take one of two values, 0 or 0x80000000.

  • When x = 0, then x + (y ^ x) = y then trivial holds.
  • Adding and xoring by 0x80000000 is the same. It flips the sign bit. Therefore x + (y ^ x) = y also holds when x = 0x80000000.

Therefore, x + (y ^ x) reduces to y. And the code simplifies to this:

int fast_trunc_one(int i) {
    int mantissa, exponent, sign, r;

    mantissa = (i & 0x07fffff) | 0x800000;
    exponent = 150 - ((i >> 23) & 0xff);
    sign = i & 0x80000000;

    if (exponent < 0) {
        r = (mantissa << -exponent);
    } else {
        r = (mantissa >> exponent);
    }

    return r;
}

Again, this compiles to the exact same assembly - register names and all.


This above version finally reduces to this:

int fast_trunc_one(int i) {
    int mantissa, exponent;

    mantissa = (i & 0x07fffff) | 0x800000;
    exponent = 150 - ((i >> 23) & 0xff);

    if (exponent < 0) {
        return (mantissa << -exponent);             /* diff */
    } else {
        return (mantissa >> exponent);              /* diff */
    }
}

which is pretty much exactly what GCC generates in the assembly.


So why doesn't the compiler optimize fast_trunc_two() to the same thing?

The key part in fast_trunc_one() is the x + (y ^ x) = y optimization. In fast_trunc_two() the x + (y ^ x) expression is being split across the branch.

I suspect that might be enough to confuse GCC to not make this optimization. (It would need to hoist the ^ -sign out of the branch and merge it into the r + sign at the end.)

For example, this produces the same assembly as fast_trunc_one():

int fast_trunc_two(int i) {
    int mantissa, exponent, sign, r;

    mantissa = (i & 0x07fffff) | 0x800000;
    exponent = 150 - ((i >> 23) & 0xff);
    sign = i & 0x80000000;

    if (exponent < 0) {
        r = ((mantissa << -exponent) ^ -sign) + sign;             /* diff */
    } else {
        r = ((mantissa >> exponent) ^ -sign) + sign;              /* diff */
    }

    return r;                                     /* diff */
}
share|improve this answer
5  
@Mystical you must have read the OP wrong. fast_trunc_two() produces longer assembly, not shorter. –  Richard J. Ross III Apr 20 '12 at 18:00
9  
It looks like the question has changed since it was posted... –  Mysticial Apr 20 '12 at 18:01
3  
Edit, it looks like I've answered revision two. The current revision flipped the two examples and changed the code a bit... this is confusing. –  Mysticial Apr 20 '12 at 18:03
1  
@nightcracker No worries. I've updated my answer to sync with the current version. –  Mysticial Apr 20 '12 at 18:17
10  
Answer updated again. I'm not sure if it's satisfying enough. But I don't think I can do much better without knowing exactly how the relevant GCC optimization passes work. –  Mysticial Apr 20 '12 at 18:43

This is the nature of compilers. Assuming they will take the fastest or best path, is quite false. Anyone that implies that you dont need to do anything to your code to optimize because "modern compilers" fill in the blank, do the best job, make the fastest code, etc. Actually I saw gcc get worse from 3.x to 4.x on arm at least. 4.x might have caught up to 3.x by this point, but early on it produced slower code. With practice you can learn how to write your code so the compiler doesnt have to work as hard and as a result produces more consistent and expected results.

The bug here is your expectations of what will be produced, not what was actually produced. If you want the compiler to generate the same output, feed it the same input. Not mathmatically the same, not kinda the same, but actually the same, no different paths, no sharing or distributing operations from one version to the other. This is a good exercise in understanding how to write your code and seeing what compilers do with it. Dont make the mistake of assuming that because one version of gcc for one processor target one day produced a certain result that that is a rule for all compilers and all code. You have to use many compilers and many targets to get a feel for what is going on.

gcc is pretty nasty, I invite you to look behind the curtain, look at the guts of gcc, try to add a target or modify something yourself. It is barely held together by duct tape and bailing wire. An extra line of code added or removed in critical places and it comes crumbling down. The fact that it has produced usable code at all is something to be pleased about, instead of worrying about why it didnt meet other expectations.

did you look at what different versions of gcc produce? 3.x and 4.x in particular 4.5 vs 4.6 vs 4.7, etc? and for different target processors, x86, arm, mips, etc or different flavors of x86 if that is the native compiler you use, 32 bit vs 64 bit, etc? And then llvm (clang) for different targets?

Mystical has done an excellent job in the thought process required to work through the problem of analyzing/optimizing the code, expecting a compiler to come up with any of that is, well, not expected of any "modern compiler".

Without getting into the math properties, code of this form

if (exponent < 0) {
  r = mantissa << -exponent;                       /* diff */
} else {
  r = mantissa >> exponent;                        /* diff */
}
return (r ^ -sign) + sign;                           /* diff */

is going to lead the compiler to A: implement it in that form, perform the if-then-else then converge on common code to finish up and return. or B: save a branch since this is the tail end of the function. Also not bother with using or saving r.

if (exponent < 0) {
  return((mantissa << -exponent)^-sign)+sign;
} else {
  return((mantissa << -exponent)^-sign)+sign;
}

Then you can get into as Mystical pointed out the sign variable disappears all together for the code as written. I wouldnt expect the compiler to see the sign variable go away so you should have done that yourself and not forced the compiler to try to figure it out.

This is a perfect opportunity to dig into the gcc source code. It appears you have found a case where the optimizer saw one thing in one case then another thing in another case. Then take the next step and see if you cant get gcc to see that case. Every optimization is there because some individual or group recognized the optimization and intentionally put it there. For this optimization to be there and work every time someone has to put it there (and then test it, and then maintain it into the future).

Definitely do not assume that less code is faster and more code is slower, it is very easy to create and find examples of that not being true. It might more often than not be the case of less code being faster than more code. As I demonstrated from the start though you can create more code to save branching in that case or looping, etc and have the net result be faster code.

The bottom line is you fed a compiler different source and expected the same results. The problem is not the compiler output but the expectations of the user. It is fairly easy to demonstrate for a particular compiler and processor, the addition of one line of code that makes a whole function dramatically slower. For example why does changing a = b + 2; to a = b + c + 2; cause _fill_in_the_blank_compiler_name_ generate radically different and slower code? The answer of course being the compiler was fed different code on the input so it is perfectly valid for the compiler to generate different output. (even better is when you swap two unrelated lines of code and cause the output to change dramatically) There is no expected relationship between the complexity and size of the input to the complexity and size of the output. Feed something like this into clang:

for(ra=0;ra<20;ra++) dummy(ra);

It produced somewhere between 60-100 lines of assembler. It unrolled the loop. I didnt count the lines, if you think about it, it has to add, copy the result to the input to the function call, make the function call, three operations minimum. so depending on the target that is probably 60 instructions at least, 80 if four per loop, 100 if five per loop, etc.

share|improve this answer
2  
+1, This is a nice extension to my answer. :) –  Mysticial Apr 20 '12 at 20:51
    
Thanks, I already +1 to you for having such a good answer. –  dwelch Apr 21 '12 at 0:29
4  
You are welcome to edit it, or welcome to just put those two lines in a comment or answer. –  dwelch Apr 22 '12 at 3:34

Mysticial has already given a great explanation, but I thought I'd add, FWIW, that there's really nothing fundamental about why a compiler would make the optimization for one and not the other.

LLVM's clang compiler, for example, gives the same code for both functions (except for the function name), giving:

_fast_trunc_two:                        ## @fast_trunc_one
        movl    %edi, %edx
        andl    $-2147483648, %edx      ## imm = 0xFFFFFFFF80000000
        movl    %edi, %esi
        andl    $8388607, %esi          ## imm = 0x7FFFFF
        orl     $8388608, %esi          ## imm = 0x800000
        shrl    $23, %edi
        movzbl  %dil, %eax
        movl    $150, %ecx
        subl    %eax, %ecx
        js      LBB0_1
        shrl    %cl, %esi
        jmp     LBB0_3
LBB0_1:                                 ## %if.then
        negl    %ecx
        shll    %cl, %esi
LBB0_3:                                 ## %if.end
        movl    %edx, %eax
        negl    %eax
        xorl    %esi, %eax
        addl    %edx, %eax
        ret

This code isn't as short as the first gcc version from the OP, but not as long as the second.

Code from another compiler (which I won't name), compiling for x86_64, produces this for both functions:

fast_trunc_one:
        movl      %edi, %ecx        
        shrl      $23, %ecx         
        movl      %edi, %eax        
        movzbl    %cl, %edx         
        andl      $8388607, %eax    
        negl      %edx              
        orl       $8388608, %eax    
        addl      $150, %edx        
        movl      %eax, %esi        
        movl      %edx, %ecx        
        andl      $-2147483648, %edi
        negl      %ecx              
        movl      %edi, %r8d        
        shll      %cl, %esi         
        negl      %r8d              
        movl      %edx, %ecx        
        shrl      %cl, %eax         
        testl     %edx, %edx        
        cmovl     %esi, %eax        
        xorl      %r8d, %eax        
        addl      %edi, %eax        
        ret                         

which is fascinating in that it computes both sides of the if and then uses a conditional move at the end to pick the right one.

The Open64 compiler produces the following:

fast_trunc_one: 
    movl %edi,%r9d                  
    sarl $23,%r9d                   
    movzbl %r9b,%r9d                
    addl $-150,%r9d                 
    movl %edi,%eax                  
    movl %r9d,%r8d                  
    andl $8388607,%eax              
    negl %r8d                       
    orl $8388608,%eax               
    testl %r8d,%r8d                 
    jl .LBB2_fast_trunc_one         
    movl %r8d,%ecx                  
    movl %eax,%edx                  
    sarl %cl,%edx                   
.Lt_0_1538:
    andl $-2147483648,%edi          
    movl %edi,%eax                  
    negl %eax                       
    xorl %edx,%eax                  
    addl %edi,%eax                  
    ret                             
    .p2align 5,,31
.LBB2_fast_trunc_one:
    movl %r9d,%ecx                  
    movl %eax,%edx                  
    shll %cl,%edx                   
    jmp .Lt_0_1538                  

and similar, but not identical, code for fast_trunc_two.

Anyway, when it comes to optimization, it's a lottery — it is what it is... It isn't always easy to know why you code gets compiled any particular way.

share|improve this answer
5  
Is the compiler you won't name some top-secret supercompiler? –  nightcracker Apr 30 '12 at 12:02
    
the Top Secret compiler is probably Intel icc. I only have the 32-bit variant but it produces code very similar to this. –  Janus Troelsen May 1 '12 at 21:43
2  
I also believe it's ICC. The compiler knows that the processor is capable of instruction level parallelism and thus both branches can be computed simultaneously. The overhead of conditional move is much lower than overhead of false branch prediction. –  Filip Navara May 19 '12 at 9:15
    
haha no one understands Intel more than Intel –  Lưu Vĩnh Phúc Aug 3 '13 at 13:11

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