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I'm in agreement with Osherove that unit tests should have one assertion, not many. However, when I apply that principal to ASP.NET MVC unit tests, I wonder if it is too strick. Consider these tests:

    [TestMethod] 
    public void RedirectTest() {     
        // Arrange - create the controller   
        ExampleController target = new ExampleController();     

        // Act - call the action method     
        RedirectResult result = target.Redirect();   

        // Assert - check the result
        Assert.IsFalse(result.Permanent);     
        Assert.AreEqual("/Example/Index", result.Url); 
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void RedirectValueTest() {     
        // Arrange - create the controller     
        ExampleController target = new ExampleController();     
        // Act - call the action method     
        RedirectToRouteResult result = target.Redirect();     
        // Assert - check the result     
        Assert.IsFalse(result.Permanent);     
        Assert.AreEqual("Example", result.RouteValues["controller"]);    
        Assert.AreEqual("Index", result.RouteValues["action"]);    
        Assert.AreEqual("MyID", result.RouteValues["ID"]); 
    }

Certainly the above two tests could be split into six tests (one assert each), but it feels a bit on the excessive side. Is there a best practice around this? What do you do? I will certainly go down the path of one test per assert, if that is where the test-expertise consensus is...

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2  
Create an AssertResult method and call it once? –  jrummell Apr 20 '12 at 17:54

5 Answers 5

The first issue I see is your test names ... they don't say what the unit test is really supposed to be testing. I would break some of those tests up. This first test would remove the Assert.IsFalse(result.Permanent) from both your tests:

[TestMethod] 
public void Redirect_result_should_set_Permanent_to_false() {     
    // Arrange - create the controller   
    ExampleController target = new ExampleController();     

    // Act - call the action method     
    RedirectResult result = target.Redirect();   

    // Assert - check the result
    Assert.IsFalse(result.Permanent);     
}

Why should you do this? If result.Permanent == true, both your tests will fail, but you won't know why. In this case, you will know why.

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Assertions
Your unit test should only ever test a single focused scenario. This may or may no be more than one actual physical assert. Preferably it is only a single physical assert but that is not always possible. The gist of it is, each test only covers a specific focused scenario.

Naming and Organisation
Naming your unit Tests is very important. Your names should reflect the scenario you are testing.

You can for example have multiple test classes testing a single physical class. This is also good practice so you can break down your tests into related groups and also not fill up a single test class with so many lines of code it becomes unreadable.

What I have seen done before is developers creating a test folder with the name of the class that is being tested. That folder than contains test classes for each logical group of tests. In each class you have methods which nearly sound like sentences.

Say your class to test is called MyCalculator so you create a folder named MyCalculator.Tests. In that folder you can now create a test class for each set of logical tests. Such as a class named MultiplicationTests or DivisionTests or AdditionTests and so on. Each class can contain test methods related to that logical group.

For example for the add tests you might have test methods such as

  • When_adding_any_2_numbers_then_result_is_correct
  • When_adding_small_negative_and_large_positive_numbers_then_result_is_correct_positive
  • When_adding_large_negative_and_small_positive_numbers_then_result_is_correct_negative

Each test only tests a given scenario and the name of the test describes it very well too.

Why would you break down your scenarios into so many tests? By doing so you ensure that you most likely only test a single focused scenario within each single test. You also ensure when a bug occurs in the future only directly effected tests are breaking.

If for example you have a bug at some stage which causes your add method to throw an exception when the result of an addition is a negative number than only the tests or test concerned with testing negative results are effected.

In addition the time you spend on writing focused unit tests well outweighs the cost and time involved at a later stage if you have tests asserting so many scenarios you don't actually know what exactly is failing the test.

There is many ways to organise your tests but the general aim should always be the same, that each test only tests a specific focused scenario.

Your Scenario
In your scenario for example within your RedirectTest your test will fail if Assert.IsFalse(result.Permanent); fails. That does not neccesarely mean that your redirect failed. Your test should only fail if you are not redirected to the expected URL and nothing else. If the content of the page is not rendered as expected or data is missing should be irrelevant to that particular test.

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A test can have as many assertions as it needs as long as it is testing a discrete code path. Having only one assertion per test seems like it would be overkill in terms of maintaining your tests.

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Personally I tend to keep one assert per test. I have sometimes though keep up to four (my personal rule of thumb) asserts in a single test when I'm testing Asp .Net MVC controllers.

The problem with having more than one assert per test is that when, lets say, the first assert fails you will not know if anything is wrong or right with the rest of them so it very well might happen that you fix your code so that first assert passes only to find out that the second one failed for a different reason.

Sometimes even though you are testing something very specific in a controller, more than one assert makes sense, to the top of my mind if the result contains the correct view name, and the associated model contains the expected data, for example. In this cases either you put several asserts on one test, knowing fully well about the cons of that approach or you can extract the arrange and act sections of the test in a method and create several tests that call upon that method, get the result and assert on the specific piece of data.

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The main(?) reason some people say that you should only have one assert is because you can only get fail feedback from one assert at a time. That is, you get more feedback if you place your asserts in different tests.

I think you can have several asserts per test though. There are other aspects that are more important, like for instance readability. If you have more tests you get more code to read and it becomes more difficult to get an overview of your test suit.

However, I think that all important asserts should be placed inside the test so that you don't have to go elsewhere to find it, thus making it harder to grasp. With important I mean things that the test aim to verify. For instance, you could have hidden assertions for things that must work for the test to make sense, things that other tests verify more clearly.

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@downvoter: care to explain? –  Torbjörn Kalin Apr 20 '12 at 20:55

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