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I'm kinda surprised that the Meteor.method definitions require a result to be returned rather than a callback be called. But so it is!

I'm trying to make an RPC method in Meteor that calls mongoose group methods (It didn't look like meteor's data api lets me do it so I'm working around it). I have something like this:

Meteor.methods
  getdata: ->
    mongoose = __meteor_bootstrap__.require('mongoose')
    db = mongoose.connect(__meteor_bootstrap__.mongo_url)
    ASchema = new mongoose.Schema()
    ASchema.add({key: String})
    AObject = mongoose.model('AObject',ASchema)
    AObject.collection.group(
      ...
      ...
      (err,doc) -> # mongoose callback function
         # I want to return some variation of 'doc'
    )
    return ??? # I need to return 'doc' here.

My own variation of the code posted above does work...I get calls from my meteor client, the mongoose objects all work their magic. But I can't figure out how to get my results to return within the original context.

How can I do this?


The answer I went with would make my code look like this:

require = __meteor_bootstrap__.require
Meteor.methods
  getdata: ->
    mongoose = require('mongoose')
    Future = require('fibers/future')
    db = mongoose.connect(__meteor_bootstrap__.mongo_url)
    ASchema = new mongoose.Schema()
    ASchema.add({key: String})
    AObject = mongoose.model('AObject',ASchema)
    group = Future.wrap(AObject.collection.group,6)
    docs = group.call(AObject,collection,
      ...
      ...
    ).wait()
    return docs
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Ah...figured it out. After googling and googling and finding inordinate numbers of comments along the lines of "don't do it that way, use callbacks!", I finally found it: use fibers!

I ended up using the fibers-promise library. My final code looks something like this:

Meteor.methods
  getdata: ->
    promise = __meteor_bootstrap__.require('fibers-promise')
    mongoose = __meteor_bootstrap__.require('mongoose')
    db = mongoose.connect(__meteor_bootstrap__.mongo_url)
    ASchema = new mongoose.Schema()
    ASchema.add({key: String})
    AObject = mongoose.model('AObject',ASchema)
    mypromise = promise()
    AObject.collection.group(
      ...
      ...
      (err,doc) -> # mongoose callback function
         if err
           mypromise.set new Meteor.Error(500, "my error")
           return
         ...
         ...
         mypromise.set mydesiredresults
    )
    finalValue = mypromise.get()
    if finalValue instanceof Meteor.Error
      throw finalValue
    return finalValue
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1  
You can accept your own answers and I think it would be justified here. You might have to wait awhile first though. –  mu is too short Apr 20 '12 at 19:16
    
Sorry about that - I got excited for a min there and just couldn't help myself. –  dsummersl Apr 20 '12 at 19:54
    
I'm not complaining, I'm suggesting that you accept your own answer to make it easier for future searchers to solve similar problems. –  mu is too short Apr 20 '12 at 20:15
    
Oh right, duh. Well, it won't let me do that for 2 more days, but I will, thanks. –  dsummersl Apr 20 '12 at 20:45

Check out this amazing gist with a collection of example.

share|improve this answer
    
how the hell was this not accepted as an answer. +1'd –  KJW Mar 25 '13 at 16:53

Using the fibers/future module may give you a better API for Meteor as this is what is used internally, and it comes with any vanilla meteor install.

To take your example:

require  = __meteor_bootstrap__.require
Future   = require 'fibers/future'
mongoose = require 'mongoose'

Meteor.methods
  getdata: ->
    db = mongoose.connect(__meteor_bootstrap__.mongo_url)
    ASchema = new mongoose.Schema()
    ASchema.add({key: String})
    AObject = mongoose.model('AObject',ASchema)

    # wrap the method into a promise
    group = Future.wrap(AObject.collection.group)

    # .wait() will either throw an error or return the result
    doc = group(... args without callback ...).wait()
share|improve this answer
    
That does sound nicer, I'll try it out. –  dsummersl Apr 22 '12 at 12:27
    
if you try doc = group.call(AObject.collection, ...args without callback...).wait() instead of doc = group(...args without callback...).wait(), do you still get the same exception? –  olivoil Apr 23 '12 at 6:18
    
Arg, sorry for the run around. So that first error I posted (Object #<Object>...) was when I tried to wrap an 'AObject.find' call. I tried passing AObject to that with little luck (same kind of error above). Then I tried just AObject.collection.group as I'd written in the post, and it gives me this error: function expects no more than -1 arguments. I tried putting AObject.collection in as an argument and get the same kind of error. –  dsummersl Apr 23 '12 at 14:46
    
The error with 'requires no more than -1 arg' is common. It's because you call the wrapped method without arguments. You need to give the arity of the method to wrap as the second argument in these cases: Future.wrap(Aboject.collection.group, 0)... with 0 being the arity of the function (as in it takes 0 args and a callback - cahnge as needed). The TypeError ('has no method...) sounds like the value of this is not set to what you expected, that's why I suggested doing something like find.call(AObject, args...). I hope this helps, I would need to see/interact with your code to go further... –  olivoil Apr 24 '12 at 20:08
    
Thanks, I got it to work, and since it doesn't require an additional package to be created, I'm picking it. –  dsummersl Apr 26 '12 at 2:22

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