Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I implemented a Fisher-Yates shuffle recently, which used List.permute to shuffle the list, and noted that as the size of the list increased, there was a significant performance decrease. I suspect this is due to the fact that while the algorithm assumes it is operating on an array, permute must be accessing the list elements by index, which is O(n).

To confirm this, I tried out applying a permutation to a list to reverse its element, comparing working directly on the list, and transforming the list into an array and back to a list:

let permute i max = max - i - 1
let test = [ 0 .. 10000 ]

let rev1 list =
   let perm i = permute i (List.length list)
   List.permute perm list

let rev2 list =
   let array = List.toArray list
   let perm i = permute i (Array.length array)
   Array.permute perm array |> Array.toList 

I get the following results, which tend to confirm my assumption:

rev1 test;;
Real: 00:00:00.283, CPU: 00:00:00.265, GC gen0: 0, gen1: 0, gen2: 0
rev2 test;;
Real: 00:00:00.003, CPU: 00:00:00.000, GC gen0: 0, gen1: 0, gen2: 0

My question is the following:

1) Should List.permute be avoided for performance reasons? And, relatedly, shouldn't the implementation of List.permute automatically do the transformation into an Array behind the scenes?

2) Besides using an Array, is there a more functional way / data structure suitable for this type of work, i.e. shuffling of elements? Or is this simply a problem for which an Array is the right data structure to use?

share|improve this question
    
Good question and excellent answer. Sometimes learn a lot on S O –  Onorio Catenacci Apr 20 '12 at 19:27
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

List.permute converts the list to an array, calls Array.permute, then converts it back to a list. Based on that, you can probably figure out what you need to do (hint: work with arrays!).

share|improve this answer
    
Then I don't understand why the example above doesn't give the same performance - I would expect the 2nd example to run as fast, or potentially slower because there is an extra Array conversion happening. –  Mathias Apr 20 '12 at 18:49
2  
The reason for the difference is your use of List.length O(N) vs Array.length O(1). –  Daniel Apr 20 '12 at 18:50
    
You are correct! I changed rev1 to let l = (List.toArray list).Length and let perm i = permute i l and it now runs faster. Thank you for the enlightening answer! –  Mathias Apr 20 '12 at 18:58
add comment

Should List.permute be avoided for performance reasons?

The only performance problem here is in your own code, specifically calling List.length.

Besides using an Array, is there a more functional way / data structure suitable for this type of work, i.e. shuffling of elements? Or is this simply a problem for which an Array is the right data structure to use?

You are assuming that arrays cannot be used functionally when, in fact, they can by not mutating their elements. Consider the permute function:

let permute f (xs: _ []) = Array.init xs.Length (fun i -> xs.[f i])

Although it acts upon an array and produces an array it is not mutating anything so it is using an array as a purely functional data structure.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.