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I just wrote my first C# program.

It's a simple piece of code which solves quadratic equations.

It works with some functions (such as -6x2-6x+12) perfectly, while with others, (4x2-20x+25) it exhibits what I suspect are rounding errors.

I'm completely new to C#, and I can't see an problems; would someone be able to help me debug this code?

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace ConsoleApplication7
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            int a, b, c;
            int d;
            double x1, x2;
            entA: Console.Write("a?");
            try
            {
                a = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine());
            }
            catch
            {
                /*If a=0, the equation isn't quadratic*/
                Console.WriteLine("Invalid input");
                goto entA;
            }
            entB: Console.Write("b?");
            try
            {
                b = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine());
            }
            catch
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Invalid input");
                goto entB;
            }
            entC: Console.Write("c?");
            try
            {
                c = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine());
            }
            catch
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Invalid input");
                goto entC;
            }
            /*Calculating a discriminant*/
            d = b * b - 4 * a * c;
            if (d == 0)
            {
                x1 = x2 = -b / (2 * a);
                Console.WriteLine("The only solution is x={0}.", x1);
                Console.ReadLine();
            }
            else if (d < 0) /*If d<0, no solutions are possible*/
            { 
                Console.WriteLine("There are no possible solutions");
                Console.ReadLine();
            }
            else /*If d>0, there are two possible solutions*/
            {
                x1 = (-b - Math.Sqrt(d)) / (2 * a);
                x2 = (-b + Math.Sqrt(d)) / (2 * a);
                Console.WriteLine("x1={0} and x2={1}.", x1, x2);
                Console.ReadLine();
            }
        }
    }
}

Here's the updated code:

    namespace ConsoleApplication7
    {
    class Program
    {
        static int ObtainInput(string prompt, bool canBeZero)
        {
            double a = ObtainInput("A? ", false);
            double b = ObtainInput("B? ", true);
            double c = ObtainInput("C? ", true);
            double d;
            double x1, x2;
            while (true) // loop forever!
            {
                Console.Write(prompt);
                string input = Console.ReadLine();
                int result;
                bool success = int.TryParse(input, out result);
                if (success && (canBeZero || result != 0))
                    return result;
                Console.WriteLine("Invalid input!");
            }
            /Calculating a discriminant/
            d = b * b - 4 * a * c;
            if (d == 0)
            {
                x1 = x2 = -b / (2 * a);
                Console.WriteLine("The only solution is x={0}.", x1);
                Console.ReadLine();
            }
            else if (d < 0) /If d<0, no solutions are possible/
            { 
                Console.WriteLine("There are no possible solutions");
                Console.ReadLine();
            }
            else /If d>0, there are two possible solutions/
            {
                x1 = (-b - Math.Sqrt(d)) / (2 * a);
                x2 = (-b + Math.Sqrt(d)) / (2 * a);
                Console.WriteLine("x1={0} and x2={1}.", x1, x2);
                Console.ReadLine();
            }
        }
    }
    }
    

share|improve this question
    
In C#, nobody uses gotos. Hell, I knew it existed but the syntax is news to me =o –  Baboon Apr 20 '12 at 20:02
    
Change all of your int values (a, b, c, d) to double and try it again. Things like '(-b / (2 * a))', when a and b are int will do "integer division". That's a seriously bad rounding error. –  Jim Mischel Apr 20 '12 at 20:02
    
@Baboon I had the same reaction when I saw them. –  NominSim Apr 20 '12 at 20:04
    
@Verandaguy, please consider making samples smaller for future questions, i.e. there is no need to show code that reads values, no need for ReadLine calls, no need for extra namespaces. Try to make it small: under 7 lines is awesome, small enough to not have to scroll - ok. The one you've posted (with goto???) is a bit too much. –  Alexei Levenkov Apr 20 '12 at 20:19
1  
@Baboon et al: Sometimes (rarely)a single goto can improve readability. I've used goto at least twice this year. –  configurator Jul 18 '12 at 15:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 17 down vote accepted

I just wrote my first C# program.

Awesome. Now would be a great time to not get into bad habits:

entA: Console.Write("a?");   
try { a = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine()); }
catch 
{ /*If a=0, the equation isn't quadratic*/
  Console.WriteLine("Invalid input"); 
  goto entA;             
} 

Problems abound. First off, use int.TryParse, rather than putting a try-catch around something that can fail.

Second, the comment does not match the action of the code. The code determines if the result is an integer; the comment says that it checks for zero.

Third, do not use a goto when what you are attempting to represent is a loop.

Fourth, look at all that duplicated code! You have the same code repeated three times with minor variations.

Make yourself a helper method:

 static int ObtainInput(string prompt, bool canBeZero)
 {
     while(true) // loop forever!
     {
         Console.Write(prompt);
         string input = Console.ReadLine();
         int result;
         bool success = int.TryParse(input, out result);
         if (success && (canBeZero || result != 0))
             return result;
         Console.WriteLine("Invalid input!");
     }
 }

And now your mainline is:

int a = ObtainInput("A? ", false);
int b = ObtainInput("B? ", true);
int c = ObtainInput("C? ", true);

Your bug though is here:

x1 = x2 = -b / (2 * a);   

You do the arithmetic in integers, and then convert to doubles. That is, you do the division, round to the nearest integer, and then convert to double. Do it in doubles (or, less likely, in decimals) from the start. It should be:

double a = ObtainInput("A? ", false);
double b = ObtainInput("B? ", true);
double c = ObtainInput("C? ", true);

That is, a, b, and c should not ever be integers.

share|improve this answer
    
Also he has bug in x1 = (-b - Math.Sqrt(d)) / (2 * a); –  Saeed Amiri Apr 20 '12 at 20:46
    
Does it make sense to use decimals for math like this? Especially since there is no overload of Math.Sqrt() for decimal. –  svick Apr 20 '12 at 20:58
    
@svick: Not much, no. But it's better than ints. :-) –  Eric Lippert Apr 20 '12 at 21:17
    
@SaeedAmiri, sorry, I was unclear. I wasn't replying to your comment, but to the answer, where Eric mentioned decimals. –  svick Apr 20 '12 at 21:21
1  
@Verandaguy: I note that you didn't make the ObtainInput method like Eric suggested. Rather, you made the ObtainInput method do a lot of stuff in addition to obtaining input. Keep ObtainInput small, let it do only one job (obtaining input). Then perform your calculations in other methods (e.g., CalculateDiscriminant()). (Your code is unreachable b/c the infinite loop only returns from the method, it doesn't break out into code following the loop. Look up what the return keyword does. :) ) –  Greg D Apr 21 '12 at 19:03

You're doing integer division when assigning to x1 and x2; (you can just change the 2 to 2.0 to change it to double division and get a double result)

It might also make sense to change your a,b,c, and d values to double which will also get past the problem, and allow people to enter non-int values for the coefficients.

share|improve this answer

int a, b, c; int d;

first of all, try to use double instead of int, since 1/3 = 0 using integers.

share|improve this answer

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