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I want to check if a certain check box is selected using JavaScript/jQuery.

Here is the code I tried:

var a;
    if ($("#add_desc").checked == 1){
        a = "true";
    }else{
        a= "false";
    }

I have also tried:

var a;
    if ($("#add_desc").checked){
        a= "true";
    }else{
        a= "false";
    }

It always returns false once I alert the variable a.

Any idea why it won't work for me? Am I doing it wrong?

Thanks!

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1  
Add [0] before .checked and use your second attempt –  Kevin B Apr 20 '12 at 21:04
    
Thanks it worked! –  Baruch Apr 20 '12 at 21:06
    
By way of explanation: $('#add_desc') returns a jQuery object that contains the element, rather than the element itself, so doesn't have a checked property. Adding the [0] returns the first element contained in the jQuery object (your actual checkbox), which does have a checked property. –  Anthony Grist Apr 20 '12 at 21:07
1  
You can also access those properties with jQuery 1.6's .prop(). api.jquery.com/prop –  CWSpear Apr 20 '12 at 21:08
    
@CameronSpear You can, though to be honest this entire example is trivial enough that there's no need to use jQuery at all. –  Anthony Grist Apr 20 '12 at 21:09
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6 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

To get the value of the checked property on a checkbox input, use the .prop() method, or get the value directly from the DOM element. [0] returns the first selected DOM element.

var a;
if ($("#add_desc")[0].checked){
    a= "true";
}else{
    a= "false";
}

or

var a;
if ($("#add_desc").prop("checked")){
    a= "true";
}else{
    a= "false";
}

Edit
For versions of jQuery older than 1.6, .prop didn't exist, use .attr as a direct replacement.

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Simple,

var a = $('#element:checkbox').is(':checked');
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That would make the variable a boolean while in his example he's assigning string values... –  Michael Berkompas Aug 6 '12 at 22:53
    
Yes. But how hard would it be to do a toString() if required? –  Robin Maben Aug 7 '12 at 5:25
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The "jQuery way" would be to use .is(":checked"):

var a;
if ($("#add_desc").is(":checked")){ // box is checked
    a = "true";
} else{ // box is not checked
    a= "false";
}

I use this a lot in my web apps and it works perfectly.

From the jQuery .is documentation page:

Unlike other filtering methods, .is() does not create a new jQuery object. Instead, it allows you to test the contents of a jQuery object without modification. This is often useful inside callbacks, such as event handlers.

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The ternary operator in javascript combined with jQuery .is() is the shortest solution.

var a = ($("#add_desc").is(":checked")) ? "true" : "false";
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try:

if ($('#add_desc').is(':checked')) {
  a = "true";
} else {
  b = "false";
}

you may also not want to use strings, i.e. use true and false instead of "true" and "false"

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Try

$get("#add_desc").checked == true

Also

$("#add_desc").prop("checked", true);
$("#add_desc").prop("checked", false);
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Note that .prop() did not exist prior to jQuery 1.6. Use .attr() for any earlier versions of jQuery. –  Nathan Apr 20 '12 at 21:20
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