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I want to track the deletion of object of some selected classes, with minimal changes in the classes code itself.

I considered overloading the delete operator (globally), but it would require that my overloaded delete was present in all the compilation unit, which in my situation could be an hassle. Also, if an array of the tracked object is created, I would have to overload the delete[] operator, but unfortunately there's no standard way to know within that overload code how long the array is and so how many objects are being destroyed. I could overload new[] operator as well and track allocations and their length, but it doesn't look like a clean solution, and suffers from the same problem of the delete[] operator, that is it has to be accessible in every compilation unit.

So I accepted to have slight modification of the target classes. My idea is to "inject" a destructor of a monitoring class in the target class, with a "dummy" (and possibly multiple) inheritance. Of course the target classes could be one child of another, so it's it looks like a job for virtual inheritance. Here's is what I came up so far.

class track_death{

protected:

    struct someusefulness{} info;

    track_death(){}

    explicit track_death(const track_death& o){
        copy_info(o);
    }

    track_death& operator=(const track_death& o){
        copy_info(o);
        return *this;
    }

    void copy_info(const track_death& o){
        //manage the copy of info, which is not trivial.
    }

    ~track_death(){
        //death has happened!
    }

};

struct anyclass: virtual track_death{
    //wathever 1...
};

struct anysubclass: public anyclass, virtual track_death{
    //wathever 2...

    anysubclass(){}

    anysubclass(const anysubclass& copythis){
        //initialization...

        //the user MUST append this last
        copy_info(copythis);
    }

};

struct anysubsubclass: public anysubclass, virtual track_death{
    //wathever 3...

    anysubsubclass& operator=(const anysubsubclass& copythis){
        //initialization...

        //the user MUST append this last
        copy_info(copythis);
        return *this;
    }

};

I have two questions.

Is this a good usage of virtual inheritance, and is it right to leave the last leaf in the inheritance tree with the virtual keyword (see anysubsubclass definition, which has no derived classes), contrary to this parashift advice? The point is that I want to bother as little as possible if about whether I'm going to add in the future ulterior derived classes from anysubsubclass, or remove, for example, anysubclass between the base and the last derived class.

Second. As you can see in my code, if one of the target classes has an overload of the operator=, or has a copy constructor, then the operator= or the copy constructor of track_death never gets called, and this is a problem as track_death contains a field that cannot be copied with its trivial copy constructor. My solution, to tell the implementer of any*class that he MUST call copy_info() with the object being copied looks error prone. Is there a better solution?

share|improve this question
    
This looks like a problem which is best solved in C++ by virtual inheritance (adding a completely orthogonal feature to a bunch of classes, regardless of the existing inheritance relations; other languages solve such things by an object universal base class + some downcasting where needed), but still, why on earth do you want to do this ? –  Alexandre C. Apr 20 '12 at 21:47
    
I'm mixing C++ and Lua in my project. I need to tell Lua when an object dies, since it can happen that Lua holds a reference (in some form) to the dying object. And I want to touch as less as possible the existing C++ code. –  Lorenzo Pistone Apr 20 '12 at 21:50
1  
rather than making your existing classes inherit virtually could you not just add the track_death class as a member to the classes you wish to track and when the containing class is destroyed then the destructor to track_death will be called?? –  EdChum Apr 20 '12 at 22:04
1  
The usual way to do this is the other way around: have Lua hold a std::shared_ptr to your object, so that its life span is extended as long as there is a living reference on the Lua side. Otherwise, you'll make a hell of the future maintenance of your program. –  Alexandre C. Apr 20 '12 at 22:06
1  
At least if memory serves, you're starting from a mistaken assumption. If you overload ::operator new or ::operator delete, it's just like any other function -- it gets defined in one TU and used from as many others as necessary. It's normally defined as a weak external in the library, so the one from the library will be used if you don't define it, but if you do define it, your's will be used. –  Jerry Coffin Apr 20 '12 at 22:30

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