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How are you supposed to programatically detect when the remote modem on your call hangs up? I am writing a C program which interfaces with a SoftModem device /dev/ttySL0 in Ubuntu linux. I am able to configure the modem using Hayes AT commands and communicate with the remote modem. However, I haven't been able to determine how I'm supposed to detect that the other end has hung up the line.

I have the modem configured so that when the other end hangs up, the device prints NO CARRIER and switches to command mode. However, I can't use the NO CARRIER string because I can't guarantee that the modem won't receive that string while in data mode.

How do you "listen" for remote hang up?

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P.S. I don't have the rep to create a 56k-modem or softmodem tag. The modem tag seems to have more to do with Internet access modems than for 56k modem-to-modem links. –  Isaac Sutherland Apr 20 '12 at 21:45
    
I added an [at-command] tag; that should suffice. [listen] is not really a tag. –  Robert Harvey Apr 20 '12 at 21:46
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Interesting one. In a RS232 hardware world, there is the CD (Carrier Detect) wire that is used for this. If you are using an API/library, is there a relevant virtualization? –  user1886721 Apr 20 '12 at 21:48
    
In my case, I'm opening /dev/ttySL0 for read/write. The modem is clearly able to detect the remote hangup (since it gives me NO CARRIER in that event) but I don't know how in user space to tell the difference between a remote hangup and an application on the remote side sending NO CARRIER. –  Isaac Sutherland Apr 20 '12 at 21:56
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If you are reading this question, the modem will receive the upper-case text NO CARRIER more than once. But from the modem, it should be enclosed in line breaks. And after you detect that text, you can try to switch to command mode with +++. If that works, your connection persists; if it doesn't (because you are already there and +++ is an invalid command), the connection has gone. If it is still there, you reattach to it and go on. –  glglgl May 15 '12 at 5:14

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Testing for NO CARRIER as text will not suffice. This text frequently occurs on sites in the net, even on Q&A sites.

Coming from the modem, it should be enclosed in line breaks.

Besides, after you detect that text, you can try to switch to command mode with +++. If that works, your connection persists and you can reattach it and continue using it. If it doesn't (because you are already there and +++ is an invalid command), the connection has gone.

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This is a hardware signal on modems, the Carrier Detect (CD) line. You'll need to monitor it to know that the connection was lost. Basics in linux are described in this how-to, you obtain the signal state with ioctl() using the TIOCM_CAR command.

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This certainly seems to be what I was looking for. It's taking more work than I was hoping to boil this down to a working example, though. In my first experiments, the DCD starts out disabled and gets enabled upon establishing a connection (as expected), but then the DCD stays enabled when the remote modem disconnects, even after I've read NO CARRIER from the device. –  Isaac Sutherland Apr 21 '12 at 2:47
    
How does it ever turn off then :) –  Hans Passant Apr 21 '12 at 2:49
    
It gets reset to 0 when I call the TIOCSSOFTCAR ioctl to clear CLOCAL. –  Isaac Sutherland Apr 21 '12 at 4:19
    
I was not personally able to make this work due to time constraints, so I found another way to solve my specific problem that doesn't involve writing new software which interfaces with a modem. –  Isaac Sutherland May 15 '12 at 4:39

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