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I am using the c++ STL Map and Vector classes in a program where I have a map that takes a vector as a key pointing to an integer. Normally when searching through a map for a value, if the value is not found, myMap.find() returns myMap.end().

My trouble comes about when I try to pre-allocate space in my vector (to prevent constantly resizing as I use them) using myVector.reserve(int). For some reason, searching my map for a vector that I know is not there will not return myMap.end() when the vector I search for has had space allocated, regardless of whether I actually fill the vector or not (Example 1).

However, simply inserting objects into the vector I wish to search for will give me the proper myMap.end() location when the vector is not in the map (Example 2).

Example 1:

#include <map>
#include <vector>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main(){

 vector<int> v, v1;
 v.reserve(1);
 v1.reserve(1);
 v[0] = 1;
 v1[0] = 2;
 map<vector <int>, int> m;

 m.insert(make_pair(v, 0));

 cout << int(m.find(v1) == m.end());
}

Returns 0

Example 2:

#include <map>
#include <vector>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main(){

 vector<int> v, v1;
 v.reserve(1);
 v[0] = 1;
 v1.push_back(5);
 map<vector <int>, int> m;

 m.insert(make_pair(v, 0));

 cout << int(m.find(v1) == m.end());
}

Returns 1

I want to be able to reserve an amount of space in my vector, but it seems as if the only way to get the map to work as shown is to insert elements on the fly and dynamically resize the vector. Is this correct? Are there any workarounds? Can anyone provide an explanation for this (apparent) aberrant behavior?

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1  
v[0] = 1; and v1[0] = 2; cause undefined behavior -- both vector<>s are still in fact empty. –  ildjarn Apr 20 '12 at 22:18
3  
reserve and resize are two very different things. You probable meant resize(1) –  Cornstalks Apr 20 '12 at 22:22
    
@Cornstalks - I actually believed that reserve() was the function that I wanted to call, but upon changing it to resize() everything works just as I had hoped. Absolutely well done! cplusplus.com provides a very complicated explanation of the difference between resize and reserve, does anyone have a...rephrasing? –  Brian Romoser Apr 20 '12 at 22:29
    
reserve pre-allocates extra memory (it won't shrink v's memory, tho) so the vector has room to grow (important note: it just allocates memory, it doesn't create objects (or ints, in this case)!). reserve will never increase or decrease the size of the vector (note that size is the number of objects in the vector, not the amount of memory allocated by the vector (the amount of memory allocated is available through capacity)). resize will actually change the vector's size and increase/decrease the number of actual objects in the vector (and it will allocate more memory if necessary). –  Cornstalks Apr 20 '12 at 23:18

1 Answer 1

Firstly, this code doesn't do what you think it is. reserve() doesn't resize().

vector<int> v;
v.reserve(100);
v[0] = 1;  //undefined
cout << v.size(); //prints 0

One more edit: I realized this is actually the "expected" behavior since in the first case, both v and v1 are empty vectors since reserve does not affect the semantics of ==, <=, etc. Once you understand that reserve is effectively doing nothing but turning a segfault into confusing behavior, this should make sense. I would recommend not EVER using reserve until you have proven it makes a performance difference (premature optimization).

My description of <= and => and maps you probably won't need here but leaving it in for reference since it may affect your work on this problem nonetheless.

Secondly, maps don't care about whether things are ==. They care whether things are <= in both directions - the word for this is "equivalent." e.g.

Foo foo1(1);
Foo foo2(2);

map<Foo, int> m;
m.insert(makepair(foo1, 1));
m.find(foo2) == m.end(); //will be true iff foo1 <= foo2 && foo2 <= foo1
//even if foo1 != foo2 or !(foo1 == foo2)

so if in some class Foo, if(foo1 <= foo2 && foo2 <= foo1) then somemap.insert(makepair(foo1, 1)); somemap.find(foo2) will find foo1 even if foo1 != foo2 or !(foo1 == foo2).

Secondly, what is your <= operator on vectors? It's not testing for having the same size and being pointwise ==. I think every vector is "equivalent", meaning <= in both directions, to the empty vector but I'm not sure - in any case think about this behavior because this is where the problem lies.

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operator< is defined for vectors in a useful way. It's equivalent to lexicographical_compare. –  Derek Ledbetter Apr 21 '12 at 0:16

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