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I have the following code:

IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<T, double>> items =
    sequence.Select(item => new KeyValuePair<T, double>(item, weight(item)));
if (items.Any(pair => pair.Value<0))
    throw new ArgumentException("Item weights cannot be less than zero.");

double sum = items.Sum(pair => pair.Value);
foreach (KeyValuePair<T, double> pair in items) {...}

Where weight is a Func<T, double>.

The problem is I want weight to be executed as few times as possible. This means it should be executed at most once for each item. I could achieve this by saving it to an array. However, if any weight returns a negative value, I don't want to continue execution.

Is there any way to accomplish this easily within the LINQ framework?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Sure, that's totally doable:

public static Func<A, double> ThrowIfNegative<A, double>(this Func<A, double> f)
{
    return a=>
    { 
      double r = f(a);  
      // if r is NaN then this will throw.
      if ( !(r >= 0.0) )
        throw new Exception(); 
      return r;
    };
}

public static Func<A, R> Memoize<A, R>(this Func<A, R> f)
{
    var d = new Dictionary<A, R>();
    return a=>
    {
        R r;
        if (!d.TryGetValue(a, out r))
        {
          r = f(a);
          d.Add(a, r);
        }
        return r;
    };
}

And now...

Func<T, double> weight = whatever;
weight = weight.ThrowIfNegative().Memoize();

and you're done.

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Why? Memoization is the correct term for this concept: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memoization –  mellamokb Apr 20 '12 at 23:08
    
@L.B: OK, what name would you prefer for a function memoizer? –  Eric Lippert Apr 20 '12 at 23:08
    
@EricLippert I don't think any of the answers are within the LINQ framework (the original question). If, on the other hand, Memoize() was already part of LINQ, then THAT (imho) would be the answer to the OP's question. I think your answer should begin with, "No, but you can extend the functionality in this way:" Perhaps this isn't the literal intent of the OP. –  payo Apr 20 '12 at 23:18
    
i never thought about chaining extension methods on Funcs before (although i bet i've used them) - i'm having trouble understanding the purpose of the T in Func<T, double> weight = whatever; –  Aaron Anodide Apr 20 '12 at 23:21
1  
@MichaelStum Checking equality against NaN is difficult because it's not equal to anything, including itself. It is neither less than, greater than or equal to zero, it is simply not a number. In Eric's code, checking the reverse will include NaN because it is clearly not greater than or equal to zero. –  Chris Hannon Apr 23 '12 at 17:03

One way is to move the exception into the weight function, or at least simulate doing so, by doing something like:

Func<T, double> weightWithCheck = i =>
    {
        double result = weight(i);
        if (result < 0)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("Item weights cannot be less than zero.");
        }
        return result;
    };

IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<T, double>> items =
    sequence.Select(item => new KeyValuePair<T, double>(item, weightWithCheck(item)));

double sum = items.Sum(pair => pair.Value);

By this point, if there is an exception to be had, you should have it. You do have to enumerate items before you can be assured of getting the exception, though, but once you get it, you will not call weight again.

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Both answers are good (where to throw the exception, and memoizing the function).

But your real problem is that your LINQ expression is evaluated every time you use it, unless you force it to evaluate and store as a List (or similar). Just change this:

sequence.Select(item => new KeyValuePair<T, double>(item, weight(item)));

To this:

sequence.Select(item => new KeyValuePair<T, double>(item, weight(item))).ToList();

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You could possibly do it with a foreach loop. Here is a way to do it in one statement:

IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<T, double>> items = sequence
    .Select(item => new KeyValuePair<T, double>(item, weight(item)))
    .Select(kvp =>
    {
        if (kvp.Value < 0)
            throw new ArgumentException("Item weights cannot be less than zero.");
        else
            return kvp;
    }
    );
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No, there is nothing already IN the LINQ framework to do this, but you could surely write up your own methods and invoke them from the linq query (As has already been shown by many).

Personally, I would either ToList the first query or use Eric's suggestion.

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