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#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class ClassA {
    int k;
public:
    ClassA(int i) : k(i) 
    {
    }

    ~ClassA()
    {
        cout << "A destroyed" << " k=" << k << endl;
    }

    ClassA copyAndModify() 
    { 
        ClassA a(k*2);
        return a; 
    }

    void taunt() 
    {
        cout << k << endl;
    }
};

int main (int argc, char * const argv[]) {
    ClassA original(1)
    ClassA modified = original.copyAndModify();
    modified.taunt();
    return 0;
}

I thought that the object 'a' (inside method copyAndModify) was deconstructed when the method returned, but it didn't. Does this mean all objects, created inside a method, that are being returned don't get deconstructed? Is this true for all compilers?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You have encountered the Return Value Optimization. No, it is not going to be the same on all compilers.

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This depends on the compiler, but usually when a method returns an object instance by value, the compiler can use RVO (Return Value Optimization) to prevent a temporary from being created at all, by passing the destination object as a hidden reference parameter. In other words, the compiler tweaks the generated code to act like you had written the code as follows:

void copyAndModify(ClassA &result)
{  
    ClassA a(k*2); 
    result = a;  
} 

ClassA modified;
original.copyAndModify(modified); 
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In the case of VS if you build in debug mode no optimization is done (the object will be destroyed), but in release mode optimization kicks in (the object will not be destroyed).

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That's correct. If it's returned, it's not destructed. That makes sense. It would not make sense to be returned an object that was already destroyed.

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2  
It would make sense to make a copy of the object that was returned, hence destroying the object that was copied. And indeed, this is the normal behavior, barring compiler optimizations. –  ildjarn Apr 20 '12 at 23:08

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