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What tools are available to obfuscate C/C++ code. I would prefer an open source solution. Thanks

Update: Regarding the "use the compiler" responses

I am aware of that but I have a client that wants to obfuscate their C/C++ code none the less I personally don't understand why, I have just been made responsible to implement a solution.

Are there any tools to perform such a task?

Regarding the down votes, if you have a problem with the question please leave a comment or an answer thanks

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closed as off-topic by Juhana, Mihai Maruseac, iCodez, Trinimon, NT3RP Sep 25 '13 at 21:02

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What will happen if you (or someone else) need to do some maintenance on the code ? will they have to loose a lot of time (== money) trying to un-obfuste the code before actually work on it ? –  Max Jan 7 '11 at 18:34
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those who need to maintain the code would use the original not the obfuscated code obviously. –  hhafez Jan 7 '11 at 19:01
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I'm hoping this isn't an attempt to violate the spirit of an (L)GPL license. "Here's our changes, have fun with that! (evil laugh)". I joke but it sounds like the only logical reason for doing this. –  SpliFF Jun 1 '12 at 4:55
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I asked exactly the same question about Java. And it got 12 or 13 downvotes and finally got deleted. This is a good question and I +1 it but what was the case with my question? –  user517491 Jun 1 '12 at 7:38
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@SpliFF Such a violation would fail to meet the requirements of the GPL at least: The "source code" for a work means the preferred form of the work for making modifications to it. "Object code" means any non-source form of a work. [Emphasis mine]. –  Istvan Chung Jun 8 '12 at 15:28
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18 Answers

up vote 36 down vote accepted

Not sure how much you're getting paid for this search, but Mangle-It C++ Code Obfuscator licenses for $69.99 -- surely a few hours of your time cost the customer more than that?!

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That is a very good point –  hhafez Jun 22 '09 at 5:19
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I agree on the "fun" -- see en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Obfuscated_code#Recreational_obfuscation for some examples;-). –  Alex Martelli Jun 22 '09 at 14:55
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Writing a good obfuscator which produces portable source (and that's the only point -- if you don't need portability, then just ship assembly or object output) is entirely non-trivial task, requiring that you properly parse and reconstruct the original source. I highly doubt you'll find the task easy (in Python, or any other language). –  Employed Russian Jun 22 '09 at 15:08
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@employed, right: that's why I said I agree on the "fun" and pointedly kept mum on the "easy";-) [Hint, though: gccxml and similar tools are pretty good at parsing C++...;-)] –  Alex Martelli Jun 22 '09 at 15:31
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Um... that one is a source obfuscator that mostly seems to replace class and variable names as well as source file names, but doesn't seem to touch exported functions or member function names, so I daresay it only obfuscates what's not visible in the executable anyway. :) –  Damon Jun 4 '12 at 11:11
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You'd better understand why, or you'll be just a code monkey doing a poor job for your customer. If you want the customer to keep hiring you, I'd suggest that talk to your customer about why they want to obfuscate their code.

Remember, your customer has a problem they want solved. Code obfuscation is what they think is the solution, but it may or may not solve their problem. And if it doesn't solve their problem, they will blame you, and you will have lost a customer.

I know that Joel talked about this on one of the recent Stackoverflow podcasts.

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The customer wants to be able to distribute the source code but with the source code unreadable :) It is simple, you can't really do that with out an obfuscation tool –  hhafez Jun 22 '09 at 5:34
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But it can always be un-obfuscated. Pretty-print it and it'll be decodable. I agree with the others. What's the point? If they need it so that others can link to it, well, distribute a library. Obfuscation is pointless unless (as with javascript obfuscators) the main reason is to reduce download size. –  Steve Lacey Jun 22 '09 at 5:52
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There's no way a pretty-printer will turn properly obfuscuated code into readable code. For instance, a good obfuscuator will use name-lookup rules to give many different variables from different scopes the same name. This may even include variables with overlapping scopes (e.g. global and locals) as long as no actual name lookup becomes formally ambiguous. Throw in a few fake templates to further complicate name lookup, an it can alias even more variables. –  MSalters Jun 22 '09 at 9:25
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@hhafez: I'm still convinced that "distributing the source code" is their idea of a solution to a problem which has not been stated yet. –  JesperE Jun 22 '09 at 21:41
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@MooingDuck: One scenario that comes to my mind immediately is that shipping binaries for all possible combinations of target platforms, std lib implementations, compiler settings, and whatnot is nigh impossible. If instead you distribute the sources, the clients compile it with compiler settings, std lib, target platform etc. set to their heart's content. In order for them to be unable to rip off your hard work, you obfuscate the code before you do that. –  sbi Jun 5 '12 at 11:01
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Follow the Standard insanely.

That'll be enough :)

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It's near impossible. Have you read the standard? –  Woodrow Douglass May 29 '12 at 13:09
    
@WoodrowDouglass Thats the thing (also) -- those who managed will also think in a very convoluted way ;) (if you mean that reading is a challenge by itself) –  mlvljr May 29 '12 at 14:03
    
A really good answer!! –  Pavel Feb 2 '13 at 23:39
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@Pavel Well, as we say it in Russian, "не всю же жизнь зубрить Страуструпа!" ;) –  mlvljr Feb 3 '13 at 15:49
    
@mlvljr мы на работе сильно поржали от этого ответа, спасибо Владимир :) –  Pavel Feb 3 '13 at 20:53
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Another commercial solution is Morpher (disclaimer: I work on this project). It is basically a version of llvm-gcc with additional obfuscation passes - constant protection, CFG arches meshing, basic block cloning and others. Available passes are described in the documentation section, with examples of generated assembly. Morpher is expected to be used as a drop-in replacement for gcc/g++; officially supported languages are C/C++/Obj-C/Obj-C++, though we can add support for anything that compiles to LLVM IR if there's such a need.

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A possiblity would be to use LLVM to read the input source, and then have LLVM output C++ using it's C++ backend. From what I've heard, the generated code shouldn't be too readable.

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It's somewhat unlikely that you'll find open-source obfuscators.

For commercial ones, google finds: semanticdesigns and stunnix. I have no experience with either, except I did look at FlexLint source, and it is pretty much incomprehensible.

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Full disclosure: I'm the Thicket (Semantic Designs) author. Source code scale matters. At a 1000+ lines, obfuscated code is extremely hard to reverse engineer. –  Ira Baxter Sep 4 '09 at 4:12
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It's not really necessary to obfuscate C/C++ code. Since it is compiled to "machine code" and not MSIL like C# or other .NET languages ... it doesn't contain and cannot be reverse engineered to the original source.

Compiling it is "obfuscation" enough. :-)

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So you want an open source solution that you're then going to sell as a solution to a client? ... –  Jeff Swensen Jun 22 '09 at 4:55
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Who said I am going to sell the software to the client? have you ever used open source tools in a commercial environment? –  hhafez Jun 22 '09 at 4:57
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@Ran Savage I am tempted to do that :p but I want to see what I can do first –  hhafez Jun 22 '09 at 4:57
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@sugerman: So the customer can compile the code of their odd ball unix platform, and use the solution, but not easily re-sale the algorithm. FlexLint is sold this way. gimpel.com/html/flex.htm –  Simeon Pilgrim Jun 22 '09 at 5:23
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And there are other scenarios specifically for C++ where someone may feel more comfortable giving out obfuscated code, templates and inline implementations. Both require code to be delivered, reverse engineering obfuscated code is ideally as hard as reverse engineering binary code also I don't have enough experience to say if that ideal is ever actually achieved. –  Chris Jun 22 '09 at 5:35
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A compiler is halfway there. If they want obfuscated C, just compile it and then decompile it.

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that is a good suggestion as well, what decompiling tools are accurate enough to do this job –  hhafez Jun 22 '09 at 5:22
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Actually thinking about it that wouldn't work because decompiler output is quite readable, yes it is different from –  hhafez Jun 22 '09 at 5:27
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Hex-rays is popular, but expensive. Boomerang is open source, but I think it's still alpha. You'd have to try it out.... but luckily, the worse the decompiler is, the more obfuscated the code will be :) –  patros Jun 22 '09 at 5:34
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I am still worried about the decompiler being inaccurate, what if the decompiled code behaves different than the original? That would be a problem! If you could satisfy me that this situation could not arise then I would believe your solution is a good one. Otherwise it is quite risky. –  hhafez Jun 22 '09 at 21:11
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A compiler doesn't work if the machine you intend to target isn't the one the compiler targets. An ARM compiler produces useless code for an x86 target. –  Ira Baxter Sep 4 '09 at 4:11
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Are you wanting the source code obfuscated, in that case follow Employed Russian's advice, or if your want the .exe obfuscated, then google for packers or protectors

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It is my understanding that a properly written obfuscator's output after compilation with a properly written compiler would be identical to the unobfuscated output. As far as I am aware both should decompile to the same code.

I feel the best course would be to explain the situation to the client. They are likely to thank you for not carrying out a task that could in the long run make them seem foolish.

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Not really. An obsfucator does more than rename variables, it might replace a static string with a function that generates a string from an algorithm - no compile time optimization will replace that. –  Martin Beckett Mar 6 '10 at 18:26
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There is an open source project called CShroud that advertises to do what you want it to do.

But, many of my colleagues would say just let me write the code for you.

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The first few hits from a google search point to a commercial tool from Stunnix, which offers a free trial. I am guessing when you say open source, you are really saying free (as in beer), and maybe for a one off job the trial version will do. I am not going to preach against that, it's always easier to avoid the hassle of getting authorization to spend money, especially for a small one off kind of task.

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I mean open source as in open source :) free as in speech –  hhafez Jun 22 '09 at 6:36
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MangleetIT is near to useless. Very easy to reverse engineer from the assembled code. It seems to just complicate the source but not even enough. UPX is an executable compressor so it can't be considered an obfuscator.

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I think MangleIT is opensource. Check if it works for you.

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You can also consider using the "strip" command to remove all symbols from the executable file.

Note that this doesn't obfuscate symbol names. It removes them. So reverse-engineering your code will become even more difficult and removing symbols will also reduce the size of your executable.

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In fact I have a tool (and an article about the source code): http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/502283/Strings-Obfuscation-System

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Runtime_packer

I think you can try UPX which is Open Source. If I remember correctly their site is hosted on SourceForge.

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He want to obfuscate the source, not the built binary. –  Cray May 25 '11 at 8:25
    
Then it wouldn't be called obfuscating the source, he would Encrypt it! –  Nocturnal May 27 '11 at 10:41
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I was also looking for such a tool and found Snob. Seems to be quick and flexible enough for my needs, and does C out of the box.

The full version of Snob is available for download. Its use, however, is restricted by the license agreement. Basically, you cannot distribute your code obfuscated with Snob without purchasing a distribution license.

But I can't see where the price is listed without contacting the authors.

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